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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

What Checkers Actually Check: An Eye Tracking Study Of Inhibitory Control And Working Memory, Ben Harkin, Sebastien R. Miellet, Klaus Kessler Jan 2012

What Checkers Actually Check: An Eye Tracking Study Of Inhibitory Control And Working Memory, Ben Harkin, Sebastien R. Miellet, Klaus Kessler

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: Not only is compulsive checking the most common symptom in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) with an estimated prevalence of 50-80% in patients, but approximately ~15% of the general population reveal subclinical checking tendencies that impact negatively on their performance in daily activities. Therefore, it is critical to understand how checking affects attention and memory in clinical as well as subclinical checkers. Eye fixations are commonly used as indicators for the distribution of attention but research in OCD has revealed mixed results at best. Methodology/Principal Finding: Here we report atypical eye movement patterns in subclinical checkers during an ecologically ...


A Critical Appraisal Of Responses To Maori Offending, Juan M. Tauri, Robert Webb Jan 2012

A Critical Appraisal Of Responses To Maori Offending, Juan M. Tauri, Robert Webb

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This article critically analyses the role that criminological theory and specific policy formulations of culture play in New Zealand's state response to Māori crime. We begin by charting policy responses to the "Māori problem" during the 1980s to the 2000s, with a particular focus on policies and interventions based on theorising that Māori offending is attributable to loss of cultural identity, through to the current preference for risk factor and criminogenic needs approaches. The second part of the article critiques strategies employed by administrative criminologists who, in partnership with the policy sector, attempt to elevate their own epistemological constructions ...


Editorial - What Is Health Promotion Ethics?, Stacy M. Carter Jan 2012

Editorial - What Is Health Promotion Ethics?, Stacy M. Carter

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

What does it mean to think about the ethics of health promotion? When most of us think 'ethics' we think of the Human Research Ethics Committee applications required for research projects. But I'm thinking of something quite different here: the ethics of health promotion practice. Health promotion ethics is an attempt to answer questions such as: Can we provide a moral justification for what we are doing in health promotion? or What is the right thing to do in health promotion, and how can we tell? As other authors have argued, sometimes these questions are ignored in health promotion ...


Final Report From The Key Stage 3 Phase: Influences On Students' Development From Age 11-14, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Pam Sammons, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart Jan 2012

Final Report From The Key Stage 3 Phase: Influences On Students' Development From Age 11-14, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Pam Sammons, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Since 1997 the Effective Pre-school, Primary and Secondary Education project (EPPE/EPPSE) has investigated the attainment and development of approximately 3,000 children from pre-school to the end of Key Stage 3 (KS3). This current phase of the research explored how different phases of education, especially secondary school, are related to students' attainment, social behaviour and dispositions at age 14 (Year 9 in secondary school) and the factors that predict developmental change. However, schools are not the only influence on students' development; families and communities matter too and these 'social' influences are carefully studied in EPPSE 3-14. The net effects ...


Influences On Students' Development In Key Stage 3: Social-Behavioural Outcomes In Year 9, Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart, Diana Draghici, Rebecca Smees, Katalin Toth Jan 2012

Influences On Students' Development In Key Stage 3: Social-Behavioural Outcomes In Year 9, Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart, Diana Draghici, Rebecca Smees, Katalin Toth

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

The Effective Pre-school, Primary and Secondary Education Project (EPPSE) has investigated the cognitive and social-behavioural development of approximately 3,000 children from the age of 3+ years since 1997. This Research Brief focuses on the relationships between a range of child, family, home, pre-, primary and secondary school characteristics and students' social-behavioural development in Year 9 at secondary school (age 14). It compares these latest findings with those found for social-behavioural development at younger ages, highlights the specific influences of secondary school on students' social-behavioural outcomes in Year 9 and changes in these developmental outcomes between the ages of 11 ...


Owning The Problem: Media Portrayals Of Overweight Dogs And The Shared Determinants Of The Health Of Human And Companion Animal Populations, Christopher J. Degeling, Melanie Rock Jan 2012

Owning The Problem: Media Portrayals Of Overweight Dogs And The Shared Determinants Of The Health Of Human And Companion Animal Populations, Christopher J. Degeling, Melanie Rock

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Weight-related health problems have become a common topic in Western mass media. News coverage has also extended to overweight pets, particularly since 2003 when the US National Academy of Sciences announced that obesity was also afflicting co-habiting companion animals in record numbers. To characterize and track views in popular circulation on causes, consequences, and responsibilities vis-à-vis weight gain and obesity, in pets as well as in people, this study examines portrayals of overweight dogs that appeared from 2000 through 2009 in British, American, and Australian mass media. The ethnographic content analysis drew inspiration from the literature in population health, animal-human ...


An Investigation Of The Association Between Socio-Demographic Factors, Dog-Exercise Requirements, And The Amount Of Walking Dogs Receive, Christopher J. Degeling, Lindsay Burton, Gavin Mccormack Jan 2012

An Investigation Of The Association Between Socio-Demographic Factors, Dog-Exercise Requirements, And The Amount Of Walking Dogs Receive, Christopher J. Degeling, Lindsay Burton, Gavin Mccormack

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Risk factors associated with canine obesity include the amount of walking a dog receives. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between canine exercise requirements, socio-demographic factors, and dog-walking behaviors in winter in Calgary. Dog owners, from a cross-sectional study which included a random sample of adults, were asked their household income, domicile type, gender, age, education level, number and breed(s) of dog(s) owned, and frequency and time spent dog-walking in a usual week. Canine exercise requirements were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) positively associated with the minutes pet dogs were walked, as was the owner being a female. Moreover, dog walking frequency, but not minutes of dog walking, was significantly associated with residing in attached housing (i.e., apartments). Different types of dogs have different exercise requirements to maintain optimal health. Understanding the role of socio-demographic factors and dog-related characteristics such as exercise requirements on dog-walking behaviors is essential for helping veterinarians and owners develop effective strategies to prevent and manage canine obesity. Furthermore, encouraging regular dog-walking has the potential to improve the health of pet dogs, and that of their owners.


Narrative Medicine: Learning Through Stories, Christopher J. Degeling Jan 2012

Narrative Medicine: Learning Through Stories, Christopher J. Degeling

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Animal owners typically speak as storytellers: they communicate concerns about their animals through a narrative. Chris Degeling argues that, rather than being a distraction, a better understanding of the nature of storytelling can help veterinarians build relationships that are both morally and clinically valuable.


Hemoglobin A1c As A Diagnostic Tool: Public Health Implications From An Actor-Network Perspective, Christopher J. Degeling, Melanie Rock Jan 2012

Hemoglobin A1c As A Diagnostic Tool: Public Health Implications From An Actor-Network Perspective, Christopher J. Degeling, Melanie Rock

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Public health arguments for collecting hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) data, particularly in clinical settings, should be reframed to place more emphasis on nonmedical determinants of population health. We compare individual- with population-level interpretations of HbA1c titers. This comparison reveals that public health researchers need to pay close attention to diagnostic tests and their uses, including rhetorical uses. We also synthesize historical and current evidence to map out 2 possible scenarios for the future. In the first scenario, prevention efforts emphasize primary care and focus almost entirely downstream. The second scenario anticipates downstream interventions but also upstream interventions targeting environments. Our analysis ...


Evidence-Based Practice?, Colin Binns, Jonine Jancey, Peter Howat, Stacy M. Carter Jan 2012

Evidence-Based Practice?, Colin Binns, Jonine Jancey, Peter Howat, Stacy M. Carter

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Editorial


High Incidence Of Nasopharyngeal Cancer: Similarity For 60% Of Mitochondrial Dna Signatures Between The Bidayuhs Of Borneo And The Bai-Yue Of Southern China, Joseph Tien Seng Wee, Tam C. Ha, Susan Loong, Chao-Nan Qian Jan 2012

High Incidence Of Nasopharyngeal Cancer: Similarity For 60% Of Mitochondrial Dna Signatures Between The Bidayuhs Of Borneo And The Bai-Yue Of Southern China, Joseph Tien Seng Wee, Tam C. Ha, Susan Loong, Chao-Nan Qian

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Populations in Southern China (Bai-yue) and Borneo (Bidayuh) with high incidence of nasopharyngeal cancer(NPC) share similar mitochondrial DNA signatures, supporting the hypothesis that these two populations may share the same genetic predisposition for NPC, which may have first appeared in a common ancestral reference population before the sea levels rose after the last ice age.


Resident Third Party Objections And Appeals Against Planning Applications: Implications For Higher Density And Social Housing, Nicole T. Cook, Elizabeth J. Taylor, Joe Hurley, Val Colic-Peisker Jan 2012

Resident Third Party Objections And Appeals Against Planning Applications: Implications For Higher Density And Social Housing, Nicole T. Cook, Elizabeth J. Taylor, Joe Hurley, Val Colic-Peisker

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This report is the first output of a research project that aims to examine two models of public engagement in planning approval processes - Third Party Objection and Appeal Rights (TPOAR) and Fast tracked planning - to see how they impact on housing supply, resident perceptions, and realisation of planning goals.


Perceptions Of Sexual Risk Compensation Following Posttrial Hiv Vaccine Uptake Among Young South Africans, Catherine L. Mac Phail, Jennifer Sayles, William Cunningham, Peter Newman Jan 2012

Perceptions Of Sexual Risk Compensation Following Posttrial Hiv Vaccine Uptake Among Young South Africans, Catherine L. Mac Phail, Jennifer Sayles, William Cunningham, Peter Newman

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Concerns about the impact of risk compensation on advances in biomedical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention technologies have been documented. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study using focus group discussions with young South African men and women (aged 18 to 24 years) to explore perceptions of risk compensation with regard to a hypothetical posttrial HIV vaccine. During the discussions, participants expressed their disquiet about the potential for risk compensation and the manner in which this might manifest among young people. Discussions specifically focused on reductions in condom use, an increase in multiple partners, and increased frequency of sex. The discussions ...


'If I Buy The Kellogg's Then He Should [Buy] The Milk': Young Women's Perspectives On Relationship Dynamics, Gender Power And Hiv Risk In Johannesburg, South Africa, Audrey Pettifor, Catherine L. Mac Phail, Althea Anderson, Suzanne Maman Jan 2012

'If I Buy The Kellogg's Then He Should [Buy] The Milk': Young Women's Perspectives On Relationship Dynamics, Gender Power And Hiv Risk In Johannesburg, South Africa, Audrey Pettifor, Catherine L. Mac Phail, Althea Anderson, Suzanne Maman

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Ideals of masculinity and femininity may limit South African women's decision making power in relationships and increase their risk of HIV infection. We conducted 30 in-depth interviews with 18-24-year-old women in inner-city Johannesburg with the aim of understanding young women's expectations of intimate relationships with men, their perceptions of gender and power and how this influences HIV risk. We found that the majority of young women reported expectations of power in relationships that conform to a model of femininity marked by financial independence, freedom to make decisions, including over sexuality, and equality (resistant femininity). The majority of young ...


The Astute Health Study Protocol: Deliberative Stakeholder Engagements To Inform Implementation Approaches To Healthcare Disinvestment, Amber M. Watt, Janet E. Hiller, Annette J. Braunack-Mayer, John R. Moss, Heather Buchan, Janet Wale, Dagmara E. Riitano, Katherine Hodgetts, Jackie M. Street, Adam Elshaug Jan 2012

The Astute Health Study Protocol: Deliberative Stakeholder Engagements To Inform Implementation Approaches To Healthcare Disinvestment, Amber M. Watt, Janet E. Hiller, Annette J. Braunack-Mayer, John R. Moss, Heather Buchan, Janet Wale, Dagmara E. Riitano, Katherine Hodgetts, Jackie M. Street, Adam Elshaug

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background

Governments and other payers are yet to determine optimal processes by which to review the safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of technologies and procedures that are in active use within health systems, and rescind funding (partially or fully) from those that display poor profiles against these parameters. To further progress a disinvestment agenda, a model is required to support payers in implementing disinvestment in a transparent manner that may withstand challenge from vested interests and concerned citizens. Combining approaches from health technology assessment and deliberative democratic theory, this project seeks to determine if and how wide stakeholder engagement can contribute ...


How Do Dentists Understand Evidence And Adopt It In Practice?, Alexandra Sbaraini, Stacy M. Carter, R Wendell Evans Jan 2012

How Do Dentists Understand Evidence And Adopt It In Practice?, Alexandra Sbaraini, Stacy M. Carter, R Wendell Evans

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Although there is now a large evidence-based dentistry literature, previous investigators have shown that dentists often consider research evidence irrelevant to their practice. To understand why this is the case, we conducted a qualitative study. Objective: Our aim was to identify how dentists define evidence and how they adopt it in practice. Methods: A qualitative study using grounded theory methodology was conducted. Ten dentists working in eight dental practices were interviewed about their experience and work processes while adopting evidence-based preventive care. Analysis involved transcript coding, detailed memo writing, and data interpretation. Results: Findings revealed that dentists' direct observations - referred ...


Experiences Of Dental Care: What Do Patients Value?, Alexandra Sbaraini, Stacy M. Carter, R Wendell Evans, Anthony Blinkhorn Jan 2012

Experiences Of Dental Care: What Do Patients Value?, Alexandra Sbaraini, Stacy M. Carter, R Wendell Evans, Anthony Blinkhorn

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background Dentistry in Australia combines business and health care service, that is, the majority of patients pay money for tangible dental procedures such as fluoride applications, dental radiographs, dental fillings, crowns, and dentures among others. There is evidence that patients question dentists' behaviours and attitudes during a dental visit when those highly technical procedures are performed. However, little is known about how patients' experience dental care as a whole. This paper illustrates the findings from a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. It focuses on patients' experiences of dental care, particularly on the relationship between patients ...


Public Health Ethics: Informing Better Public Health Practice, Stacy M. Carter, Ian Kerridge, Peter Sainsbury, Julie K. Letts Jan 2012

Public Health Ethics: Informing Better Public Health Practice, Stacy M. Carter, Ian Kerridge, Peter Sainsbury, Julie K. Letts

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Public health ethics has emerged and grown as an independent discipline over the last decade. It involves using ethical theory and empirical analyses to determine and justify the right thing to do in public health. In this paper, we distinguish public health ethics from clinical ethics, research ethics, public health law and politics. We then discuss issues in public health ethics including: how to weigh up the benefits, harms and costs of intervening; how to ensure that public health interventions produce fair outcomes; the potential for public health to undermine or promote the rights of citizens; and the significance of ...


Colorectal Cancer Screening: Why Immunochemical Fecal Occult Blood Tests May Be The Best Option, Kathy Flitcroft, Les Irwig, Stacy Carter, Glenn P. Salkeld, James Gillespie Jan 2012

Colorectal Cancer Screening: Why Immunochemical Fecal Occult Blood Tests May Be The Best Option, Kathy Flitcroft, Les Irwig, Stacy Carter, Glenn P. Salkeld, James Gillespie

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: There are many test options available for colorectal cancer screening. The choice of test relates to the objectives of those offering or considering screening.Discussion: While all screening programs aim to detect disease early in order to improve the length and/or quality of life for the individual, some organizations and individuals prefer screening tests that offer the opportunity for cancer prevention. Others favor maximizing participation or the opportunity for shared decision-making, including discussion of information on test quality and availability. We propose three additional objectives for screening: minimizing harms, optimizing economic efficiency and maximizing equity of access to ...


Occupational Therapy Discharge Planning For Older Adults: A Protocol For A Randomised Trial And Economic Evaluation, Kylie Wales, Lindy Clemson, Natasha A. Lannin, Ian D. Cameron, Glenn P. Salkeld, Laura Gitlin, Laurance Rubenstein, Sarah Barras, Lynette Mackenzie, Collette Davies Jan 2012

Occupational Therapy Discharge Planning For Older Adults: A Protocol For A Randomised Trial And Economic Evaluation, Kylie Wales, Lindy Clemson, Natasha A. Lannin, Ian D. Cameron, Glenn P. Salkeld, Laura Gitlin, Laurance Rubenstein, Sarah Barras, Lynette Mackenzie, Collette Davies

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: Decreased functional ability is common in older adults after hospitalisation. Lower levels of functional ability increase the risk of hospital readmission and nursing care facility admission. Discharge planning across the hospital and community interface is suggested to increase functional ability and decrease hospital length of stay and hospital readmission. However evidence is limited and the benefits of occupational therapists providing this service has not been investigated. This randomised trial will investigate the clinical effectiveness of a discharge planning program in reducing functional difficulties of older adults post-discharge. This trial will also examine the cost of the intervention and cost ...


Places To Play Outdoors: Sedentary And Safe Or Active And Risky?, Shirley Wyver, Paul Tranter, Ellen Sandseter, Geraldine A. Naughton, Helen Little, Anita C. Bundy, Jo Ragen, Lina Engelen Jan 2012

Places To Play Outdoors: Sedentary And Safe Or Active And Risky?, Shirley Wyver, Paul Tranter, Ellen Sandseter, Geraldine A. Naughton, Helen Little, Anita C. Bundy, Jo Ragen, Lina Engelen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

For more than a decade there has been growing concern about global reductions in physical activity and increases in sedentary behaviours. Initially, it was unclear whether children would be protected from this trend. Perhaps children's playfulness and associated activity levels would act as a protective factor. There is now compelling evidence that children's activity levels are quite sensitive to environmental factors. For example, a recent US study of activity levels in preschoolers concluded that "...the characteristics of the school have a much greater influence on a child's activity level while in school than do the child's ...


Community Based Service-Learning: Partnerships Of Reciprocal Exchange?, Laura Ann Hammersley Jan 2012

Community Based Service-Learning: Partnerships Of Reciprocal Exchange?, Laura Ann Hammersley

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Community based service-learning (CBSL) integrates experiential learning and academic goals with organised service activities designed to meet the objectives of community partners (Bringle & Hatcher, 1995). Although research remains inconclusive regarding the benefits of student outcomes, CBSL has been endowed with the potential to enhance (1) academic learning, (2) foster civic responsibility, (3) develop life skills and (4) transform student attitudes (Eyler, 2002). However, there is little research to support claims that benefits are mutual amongst host counterparts (Edwards et al., 2001; Ward & Wolf-Wendell, 2000). A lack of empirical research into community partner conceptualisations of best practice approaches, outcomes and impacts, not only reflects a uni-dimensional understanding of the mutuality of programs, but fails to challenge dominant power relations embedded in traditionally uneven partnerships. It remains problematic to engage with service-learning without considering underlying neo-colonialist ideologies that continue to permeate the ways community service, international development, and volunteering are defined and practiced. If CBSL builds upon reciprocity and collaborative partnerships, it follows that research practice should adopt similar principles. Drawing on development discourse and practice, this paper provides a critical review of the CBSL literature. First, this paper will demonstrate how closely intertwined CBSL is with contemporary development agendas; second, bring attention to the absence of partner perspectives and partner involvement within CBSL studies; and third, outline a CBSL research agenda.


How To Think About Health Promotion Ethics, Stacy M. Carter, Alan Cribb, John P. Allegrante Jan 2012

How To Think About Health Promotion Ethics, Stacy M. Carter, Alan Cribb, John P. Allegrante

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Health promotion ethics is moral deliberation about health promotion and its practice. Although academics and practitioners have been writing about ethics, and especially values, in health promotion for decades, health promotion ethics is now regaining attention within the broader literature on public health ethics. Health promotion is difficult to define, and this has implications for health promotion ethics. Health promotion can be approached in two complementary ways: as a normative ideal, and as a practice. We consider the normative ideal of health promotion to be that aspect of public health practice that is particularly concerned with the equity of social ...


Animals-As-Patients: Improving The Practice Of Animal Experimentation, Jane Johnson, Christopher J. Degeling Jan 2012

Animals-As-Patients: Improving The Practice Of Animal Experimentation, Jane Johnson, Christopher J. Degeling

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

In this paper we propose a new way of conceptualizing animals in experimentation: the animal-as-patient. Construing and treating animals as patients offers a way of successfully addressing some of the entrenched epistemological and ethical problems within a practice of animal experimentation directed to human clinical benefit. This approach is grounded in an epistemological insight and builds on work with so-called "pet models". It relies upon the occurrence and characterization of analogous human and nonhuman animal diseases, where, if certain criteria of homology and mechanism are met, the animal simultaneously becomes a patient and a spontaneous model of the human disease.


Strange Ecology, Noel Castree Jan 2012

Strange Ecology, Noel Castree

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Book review: STRANGE ECOLOGY Timothy Morton, The Ecological Thought, Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 2010; 160pp, £29.95 hardcover.

Now and again a book is written that messes with your head. Timothy Morton, Professor of Literature and Environment at the University of California (Davis), has fast made a name for himself as an out-of-the-box thinker.1 His Ecology without nature (2007) challenged readers to forget 'nature' - not, you understand, in the name of a brave new biotechnologised world in which capital entirely swallows-up the natural, but for another cause. The book attracted attention well beyond Morton's disciplinary home-base. In ...


Editors' Introduction: Human Geography, Derek Gregory, Noel Castree Jan 2012

Editors' Introduction: Human Geography, Derek Gregory, Noel Castree

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

When we were invited by Sage to identify published work in human geography that represents what is best and most distinctive about the field it seemed an impossible task (it still does) because there is such a rich volume of material to draw from. We decided to focus on Englishlanguage and to a lesser extent other European contributions, although we are acutely aware of the irony, even the imperialism, of limiting a field like human geography to knowledges rooted in only a fraction of the world. We discuss below the dangers of delimiting Geography as a European or Euro-American science ...


Preschool Programs For The General Population, Edward Melhuish, Jacqueline Barnes Jan 2012

Preschool Programs For The General Population, Edward Melhuish, Jacqueline Barnes

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

There are several small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies in the United States documenting the benefits of curriculum-led experimental preschool programs and "pre-kindergarten" education for long-term educational, occupational and social outcomes for disadvantaged children. In addition a larger-scale quasi-experimental study in Chicago found similar benefits up to age 28 of sustained, publicly-funded early education to subsequent education, socio-economic status, health and crime for a disadvantaged population. Such programs are cost-effective with disadvantaged groups, at risk for poor outcomes, in that the savings outweigh any costs. Besides benefits for disadvantaged groups, there is strong evidence that preschool education, whether or not ...


The Health And Development Of Children Born To Older Mothers In The United Kingdom: Observational Study Using Longitudinal Cohort Data, Alastair G. Sutcliffe, Jacqueline Barnes, Jay Belsky, Julian Gardiner, Edward Melhuish Jan 2012

The Health And Development Of Children Born To Older Mothers In The United Kingdom: Observational Study Using Longitudinal Cohort Data, Alastair G. Sutcliffe, Jacqueline Barnes, Jay Belsky, Julian Gardiner, Edward Melhuish

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objective To assess relations between children's health and development and maternal age. Design Observational study of longitudinal cohorts. Setting Millennium Cohort Study (a random sample of UK children) and the National Evaluation of Sure Start study (a random sample of children in deprived areas in England), 2001 to 2007. Participants 31 257 children at age 9 months, 24 781 children at age 3 years, and 22 504 at age 5 years. Main outcome measures Childhood unintentional injuries and hospital admissions (aged 9 months, 3 years, and 5 years), immunisations (aged 9 months and 3 years), body mass index, language ...


Developing Successful Diversionary Schemes For Youth From Remote Aboriginal Communities, Kate Senior, William Ivory, Richard D. Chenhall, Teresa Cunningham, Tricia Nagel, Robbie Lloyd, Rachel Mcmahon Jan 2012

Developing Successful Diversionary Schemes For Youth From Remote Aboriginal Communities, Kate Senior, William Ivory, Richard D. Chenhall, Teresa Cunningham, Tricia Nagel, Robbie Lloyd, Rachel Mcmahon

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This report explores the experiences and aspirations of youth in Wadeye, a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory which has become synonymous with the deviant behaviours of its young people. The research was undertaken over a three year period, and builds upon a previous ten year period of community based research. As such it forms a unique longitudinal study of young people during a period of extreme change in their lives. The research applied a mixed methods approach, utilising ethnography, interviews and the application of a community wide survey. Although young community based people were the primary focus of ...


A Systematic Review To Update The Australian Physical Activity Guidelines For Children And Young People, Anthony D. Okely, Jo Salmon, Stewart Vella, Dylan Cliff, Anna Timperio, Mark Tremblay, Stewart Trost, Trevor Shilton, Trina Hinkley, Nicola Ridgers, Lyn Phillipson, Kylie Hesketh, Anne-Maree Parrish, Xanne Janssen, Mark Brown, Jeffrey Emmel, Nello Marino Jan 2012

A Systematic Review To Update The Australian Physical Activity Guidelines For Children And Young People, Anthony D. Okely, Jo Salmon, Stewart Vella, Dylan Cliff, Anna Timperio, Mark Tremblay, Stewart Trost, Trevor Shilton, Trina Hinkley, Nicola Ridgers, Lyn Phillipson, Kylie Hesketh, Anne-Maree Parrish, Xanne Janssen, Mark Brown, Jeffrey Emmel, Nello Marino

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

The objective of this review is to inform Australian Government policy on the relationship between physical activity (including the amount, frequency, intensity, duration, and type) and health outcome indicators, including the risk and prevention of chronic disease and unhealthy weight gain/obesity, and to provide information to guide evidence-based recommendations that can be used to encourage healthy, active living in apparently healthy children and young people aged 5-17 years, and as a basis for monitoring physical activity on a population level.