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Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

2007

Conjugated

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Conjugated Linoleic Acid Versus High-Oleic Acid Sunflower Oil: Effects On Energy Metabolism, Glucose Tolerance, Blood Lipids, Appetite And Body Composition In Regularly Exercising Individuals, Estelle V. Lambert, Julia H. Goedecke, Kerrie Bluett, Kerry Heggie, Amanda Claassen, Dale E. Rae, Sacha West, Jonathan Dugas, Lara Dugas, Shelly Meltzer, Karen E. Charlton, Inge Mohede Jan 2007

Conjugated Linoleic Acid Versus High-Oleic Acid Sunflower Oil: Effects On Energy Metabolism, Glucose Tolerance, Blood Lipids, Appetite And Body Composition In Regularly Exercising Individuals, Estelle V. Lambert, Julia H. Goedecke, Kerrie Bluett, Kerry Heggie, Amanda Claassen, Dale E. Rae, Sacha West, Jonathan Dugas, Lara Dugas, Shelly Meltzer, Karen E. Charlton, Inge Mohede

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The aim of this study was to measure the effects of 12 weeks of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation on body composition, RER, RMR, blood lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and appetite in exercising, normal-weight persons. In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, sixty-two non-obese subjects (twenty-five men, thirty-seven women) received either 3.9 g/d CLA or 3.9 g high-oleic acid sunflower oil for 12 weeks. Prior to and after 12 weeks of supplementation, oral glucose tolerance, blood lipid concentrations, body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computerised tomography scans), RMR, resting and exercising RER and appetite were measured. There were ...