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Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

A Narrative On The Witch-Hunt Narrative: The Moral Dimensions, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2017

A Narrative On The Witch-Hunt Narrative: The Moral Dimensions, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Ross Cheit’s The Witch-Hunt Narrative raises a number of complex moral issues. Cheit’s principal purpose is to challenge the belief that our society has overreacted to claims about the sexual abuse of children. Both directly and indirectly, Cheit’s in-depth analysis broaches moral concerns pertaining to the integrity of child abuse allegations, investigations, civil litigation, and criminal prosecution, with an emphasis on the mixed motives of the parties involved in key cases. This article provides an overview of ethical questions pertaining to gathering information from very vulnerable individuals, informed consent, institutional review, protection of research participants, the use ...


Going With Your Gut: How William James' Theory Of Emotions Brings Insights To Risk Perception And Decision Making Research, Katherine Lacasse Jan 2015

Going With Your Gut: How William James' Theory Of Emotions Brings Insights To Risk Perception And Decision Making Research, Katherine Lacasse

Faculty Publications

The basic premise of William James’ theory of emotions - that bodily changes lead to emotional feelings - ignited debate about the relative importance of bodily processes and cognitive appraisals in determining emotions. Similarly, theories of risk perception have been expanding to include emotional and physiological processes along with cognitive processes. Taking a closer look at Principles of Psychology, this article examines how James’ propositions support and extend current research risk perceptions and decision making. Specifically, James (1) described emotional feelings and their related cognitions in ways similar to current dual processing models; (2) defended the proposition that emotions and their expressions ...


Clinical Social Work In A Digital Environment: Ethical And Risk-Management Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2015

Clinical Social Work In A Digital Environment: Ethical And Risk-Management Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Clinical social workers’ use of digital and other technology to provide distance counseling services is proliferating. Increasing numbers of contemporary practitioners are using video counseling, email chat, social networking websites, text messaging, smartphone apps, avatar-based websites, self-guided web-based interventions, and other technology to provide clinical services to clients, some of whom they may never meet in person. The advent of this technology has produced a wide range of ethical challenges related to social workers’ application of traditional social work ethics concepts: client informed consent; client privacy and confidentiality; boundaries and dual relationships; conflicts of interest; practitioner competence; records and documentation ...


The Evolution Of Social Work Ethics: Bearing Witness, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2014

The Evolution Of Social Work Ethics: Bearing Witness, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

The evolution of ethical standards in social work, and conceptual frameworks for examining ethical issues, is among the most compelling developments in the history of the profession. Since the formal inauguration of social work in the late nineteenth century, the profession has moved from relatively simplistic and moralistic perspectives to conceptually rich analyses of ethical issues and ethical guidelines. This article examines the evolution of social work ethics from the profession’s earliest days and speculates about future challenges and directions.


Distance And Online Social Work Education: Novel Ethical Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2013

Distance And Online Social Work Education: Novel Ethical Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Digital technology has transformed social work education. Today’s students can take individual courses and earn an entire degree without ever meeting their faculty members in person. Technological innovations such as videoconferencing, live online chat, asynchronous podcasts, and webinars enable social work educators to reach students whose personal circumstances and geographical locations make it difficult for them to attend school in person. This paper highlights complex ethical issues associated with the proliferation of digital and online social work education. Key ethical issues concern student access; course and degree program quality and integrity; academic honesty and gatekeeping; and privacy and surveillance.


Working-Class Students And Historical Inquiry, Leslie Schuster Jun 2012

Working-Class Students And Historical Inquiry, Leslie Schuster

Faculty Publications

For the past twelve years, I have been teaching a lower division introductory historical methods course that uses active learning to introduce students to the issues and practices of historical methods, the "how to" of historical inquiry, research and writing. While there are many models for such a course, including the one described by Jeffrey Merrick in the February 2006 issue of this journal, the design of such a course at my institution requires consideration of an often-overlooked dimension. The student body at Rhode Island College (RIC) is primarily working class, mirroring a significant transformation in the traditional college student ...


Open Adoption And Adolescence, Deborah H. Siegel Jul 2008

Open Adoption And Adolescence, Deborah H. Siegel

Faculty Publications

In open adoptions, birth and adoptive families exchange identifying information and have contact. Although most adoptions today include some form of openness, much of the public remains wary of this. The purpose of this study was to explore, longitudinally, adoptive parents' perceptions of their children's open adoptions. This article reports the findings of tape-recorded interviews with 31 adoptive parents who were first interviewed when their children were infants and toddlers, again 7 years later, and a third time when their children were adolescents. The study found adoptive parents were committed to maintaining contact with the birth family even when ...


Social Workers' Management Of Error, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2008

Social Workers' Management Of Error, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Social workers, like all professionals, sometimes make mistakes. For example, they may disclose clients' confidential information inappropriately, fail to respond to clients' reasonable requests in a timely manner, or engage in improper dual relationships with clients. Ideally, social workers who err would follow a protocol that honors the profession's commitment to responsible and honest communication and minimizes the practical risks faced by social workers who might be named in lawsuits, licensing board complaints, and ethics complaints. This article explores the nature and forms of social work error and possible constructive responses to it that (a) protect clients, (b) minimize ...


Ethical Issues In Open Adoption, Frederic G. Reamer, Deborah H. Siegel Jul 2007

Ethical Issues In Open Adoption, Frederic G. Reamer, Deborah H. Siegel

Faculty Publications

Total secrecy and confidentiality no longer typify adoption in the United States. Today, most adoptions involve an exchange of information or some form of contact between the birth family and adoptive family - so-called open adoptions. This article provides a comprehensive overview of ethical issues associated with various forms of open adoption, including issues of privacy, confidentiality, self-determination, paternalism, conflicts of interest, deception, and truthtelling.We present guidelines for social work practice in open adoptions, based on current ethical theory and ethical standards in social work.


Nontraditional And Unorthodox Interventions In Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer Apr 2006

Nontraditional And Unorthodox Interventions In Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Social work interventions with individuals, families, couples, and small groups have evolved over time. Traditional casework methods associated with social work's pioneers during the early and mid-twentieth century, such as Mary Richmond, Florence Hollis, Harriett Bartlett, Grace Coyle, and Helen Perlman have been transformed. Today's social workers are more likely to discuss and debate the use of such approaches as dialectical behavior therapy, narrative therapy, hypnosis, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, art and dance therapy, radical cognitive therapy, and Internet-based therapy, among others. Clinicians now have access to a staggering array of clinical options that would be unimaginable ...


Ethical And Legal Standards In Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer Apr 2005

Ethical And Legal Standards In Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Social workers frequently encounter circumstances involving ethical and legal issues. In many instances, relevant ethical and legal standards complement each other; however, in some circumstances, ethical and legal standards conflict. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between U.S. ethical and legal standards in social work. The author presents a conceptually based typology of 4 types of relationships between legal and ethical standards. Case examples are included. The author concludes with a decision-making framework designed to enhance social workers' constructive management of difficult decisions involving ethical and legal standards.


Moral Philosophy Meets Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer Sep 2001

Moral Philosophy Meets Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

In recent years, social workers have become increasingly aware of ethical dilemmas in practice. Beginning especially in the mid-to-late 1970s, social work's literature has included a steady stream of reflections on difficult moral choices involving conflicts among professional duties and obligations (Loewnberg and Dolgoff 1996; Congress 1998; Reamer 1998, 1999). To what extent do clients have the right to engage in self-harming behavior without interference? How should social workers allocate scarce or limited resources such as emergency services, shelter beds, funds, and even their own time? Is it ethically permissible for social workers to violate laws and regulations they ...


Families Affected By Substance Abuse, Annmarie Mumm, Lenore J. Olsen, Darlene Allen Jul 1998

Families Affected By Substance Abuse, Annmarie Mumm, Lenore J. Olsen, Darlene Allen

Faculty Publications

A generalist approach to practice with families affected by parental addiction is presented. Using a model program for working with parents and children who have been affected by substance abuse, the article illustrates the application of the problem-solving process to effect change at multiple levels, including individual, family, community, organizational, and policy-making levels. The authors describe assessment and intervention strategies at each of these levels and conclude with an evaluation of the project's success.


What Does One Do With White People Who Stay?, Terence E. Hays Jan 1996

What Does One Do With White People Who Stay?, Terence E. Hays

Faculty Publications

This article is a retrospective of Terence Hays and his early ethnographic experiences with the Ndumba and with those who had almost no contact with Europeans. Hays draws on other works by those who also played the "pioneer" role in their field work and discusses how the society has handled the impact from the first contact of the "true pioneers" who had arrived almost 20 years prior to Hays and the others. Many of the Highlanders already were drawing on their previous experiences with the Europeans to deal with them as a constant in their lives. Hays notes that even ...


Interest, Use, And Interest In Uses In Folk Biology, Terence E. Hays Jan 1991

Interest, Use, And Interest In Uses In Folk Biology, Terence E. Hays

Faculty Publications

In this work on folk biological taxonomy, Terence Hays the author, calls upon various works of previous field studies conducted over a long-term period including those by Bulmer, Everyman, Hunn, Brown, and Hymes. Hays looks back to works by Ralph Bulmer and his co-workers where taxonomies of five or six levels deep were not surprising. Hays points out that this is a stark contrast to Everyman, Alexander Portnoy's study regarding the simplicity of Westerners folk systems and then posits why "the folk" classify their environment in great detail. Hays brings to light that it has much to do with ...


Folktales From Habi'ina, Katnantu District, Eastern Highlands Province, Terence E. Hays Jan 1985

Folktales From Habi'ina, Katnantu District, Eastern Highlands Province, Terence E. Hays

Faculty Publications

The people of Habi'ina village live on the northern slopes of Mount Piora in the Dogara Census Division of the Kainantu District, Eastern Highlands Province. Like other Papua New Guineans, they possess a rich oral literature and tell each other stories for a wide variety of reasons. All stories are called huri, but several different types can be distinguished.


The Free Will-Determinism Debate And Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 1983

The Free Will-Determinism Debate And Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Social workers'judgments about the determinants of clients' problems have a substantial effect on practitioners' willingness to provide assistance. There is considerable variation in professionals' beliefs about the extent to which clients are themselves responsible for their difficulties, as opposed to factors that are beyond their control. This article examines the philosophical controversy known as the free will-determinism debate, and assesses its implications for the profession of social work.


Utilitarian/Adaptationist Explanations Of Folk Bioglogical Classification, Terence E. Hays May 1982

Utilitarian/Adaptationist Explanations Of Folk Bioglogical Classification, Terence E. Hays

Faculty Publications

Attempts to explain the complexity of folk biological classification systems may benefit from utilitarian or adaptationist arguments, focusing on the utilitarian or adaptive value of the behavioral consequences of folk distinctions among organisms. To adequately assess such perspectives it is necessary to resolve a number of theoretical, methodological empirical problems, which are identified and outlined in this paper as a first step toward the construction of such theories of ethnobiological classification.