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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

From Cousin Joe To The Comoros: Orthography And The Politics Of Choice In Africa And African America, Harriet Joseph Ottenheimer Jan 2003

From Cousin Joe To The Comoros: Orthography And The Politics Of Choice In Africa And African America, Harriet Joseph Ottenheimer

Ethnic Studies Review

This paper explores issues of orthographic representation in two different projects, in two different locations, and draws some general conclusions about the role of an outsider linguistic anthropologist in working with individuals and their data. One project involved helping Cousin Joe, a blues singer from New Orleans, to edit his autobiography for publication. The other project involved developing a bilingual, bidirectional, Shinzwani-English dictionary for the Comoro Islands. Each project required an awareness of-and sensitivity to-the cultural and political implications of orthographic decisions.


The Suppression Of Diversity, Adrian J. Lottie, Phyllis A. Clemens Noda Jan 2003

The Suppression Of Diversity, Adrian J. Lottie, Phyllis A. Clemens Noda

Ethnic Studies Review

Is it a systematic strategy or a mutation of millennial ferver that drives the escalating challenges to the civil rights of this nation's racial, linguistic, and national origin minorities? Increasing juridical, legislative, and popular assaults on affirmative action policies coupled with the sometimes less heralded emergence of a de facto U.S. language policy are sweeping through the states. These activities draw on a consistent repertoire of approaches from the invocation of the very language and concepts of the civil rights movement to the isolationist "buzz-words" of early twentieth century advocates of "Americanization." In an effort to legitimize their ...


Centering Race And Ethnicity- Related Issues In Social Sciences Curricula, Joseph F. Sheley Jan 2003

Centering Race And Ethnicity- Related Issues In Social Sciences Curricula, Joseph F. Sheley

Ethnic Studies Review

A 2002 review of the course requirements and electives of Economics, History, Political Science, and Sociology programs in thirty randomly selected state and private, "doctoral-level" and "masters-level" institutions produced 201 courses relating to the study of race-and ethnic-related issues. Only two courses (History offerings on a single campus) were required for completion of a major. While some departments offered "concentrations" with mandated content, the concentrations themselves were elective. Diversity in America today is a truly important component of social (re)organization and change and, thus, a major source of social friction. Why is it, then, that students, those majoring in ...


Race, Sex, And Redemption In Monster's Ball, Celeste Fisher, Carole Wiebe Jan 2003

Race, Sex, And Redemption In Monster's Ball, Celeste Fisher, Carole Wiebe

Ethnic Studies Review

In this paper, we explore the way that interracial relationships between blacks and whites come to be represented as problematic for mainstream audiences. By looking specifically at the film Monster's Ball (2001), we examine how race is used to identify and characterize our culture's standard protagonist, the white male, and at how white male sexuality is constructed through the black female. Particularly striking in this film is how the social and institutional structures that create and reiterate problems of race are used to characterize the movie's central protagonists, yet then evaded and submerged in the discourse of ...


Ethnic And Racial Definitions As Manifestations Of American Public Policy, Ashton Wesley Welch Jan 2003

Ethnic And Racial Definitions As Manifestations Of American Public Policy, Ashton Wesley Welch

Ethnic Studies Review

Official definitions of race and ethnicity in American law reveal a great deal about public policy in an environment of ethnic pluralism. Despite some ambiguity over who is black or Hispanic or an Aleut, relatively few people fall between the wide cracks in the American patchwork of identity classifications. Those cracks, however, tell us a great deal about the ambivalence of the American polity toward ethnicity.1


[Review Of] Gabriela F. Arredondo, Aida Hurtado, Norma Klahn, Olga Najera-Ramirez, And Patricia Zavella, Eds. Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader, Shirlene Soto Jan 2003

[Review Of] Gabriela F. Arredondo, Aida Hurtado, Norma Klahn, Olga Najera-Ramirez, And Patricia Zavella, Eds. Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader, Shirlene Soto

Ethnic Studies Review

Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader is a multidisciplinary anthology of twenty-two essays-eleven essays by scholars and creative writers, followed by eleven "respondent" essays. Edited by five professors from UC, Santa Cruz, Chicana Feminisms focuses on three major themes: (i) "lived realities" (ii) "creative expression" and (iii) "the politics of representation" (7). These themes are about the diversity of Chicana experience relative to socio-economic status, sexual orientation, language, and geographical region.


[Review Of] Catherine Ceniza Choy. Empire Of Care: Nursing And Migration In Filipino American History, Cecilia G. Manrique Jan 2003

[Review Of] Catherine Ceniza Choy. Empire Of Care: Nursing And Migration In Filipino American History, Cecilia G. Manrique

Ethnic Studies Review

This book takes a look at the topic of the twentieth-century migration of Filipinos to the United States and focuses specifically on those migrants in the nursing profession. Whether one agrees with the author or not, the basic premise of the piece is that an international Filipino professional nurse labor force has been created due to the historical demands of U.S. imperialism. This re-examination of the history of the role of nursing in U.S. colonialism shows that not all immigrants readily assimilate into American society and that the racialization of Filipinos in the United States continually takes place.


[Review Of] Stephen F. Feraca. Wakinyan: Lakota Religion In The Twentieth Century And Julian Rice. Before The Great Spirit: The Many Faces Of Sioux Spirituality, Raymond A. Bucko Jan 2003

[Review Of] Stephen F. Feraca. Wakinyan: Lakota Religion In The Twentieth Century And Julian Rice. Before The Great Spirit: The Many Faces Of Sioux Spirituality, Raymond A. Bucko

Ethnic Studies Review

Each of these authors provides unique approaches and insights concerning Lakota ritual and belief. Julian Rice, a prolific writer on Lakota Literature, attempts to reconstruct the essence of Lakota religion before European contact while Feraca, who logged long periods of interaction with Lakota people on the Pine Ridge Reservation as a government employee and field worker, provides an intricate portrait of Lakota ritual during his tenure on the Pine Ridge reservation. They reach similar basic understandings of Lakota religious practice: the importance of the acquisition of spiritual power, the primacy of kinship, the democratic and charismatic nature of individual religious ...


[Review Of] Hoerder, Dirk. Cultures In Contact: World Migrations In The Second Millennium, Jac D. Bulk Jan 2003

[Review Of] Hoerder, Dirk. Cultures In Contact: World Migrations In The Second Millennium, Jac D. Bulk

Ethnic Studies Review

Cultures in Contact is an ambitious tome of the annotated world history of human mass migrations both within and between national boundaries. This book provides a glorious descriptive wealth of when, where, and to a lesser extent "why" mass migrations have occurred across the largest and most populous regions of the planet earth over the span of the past millennium. In this regard it may serve as a valued reference work for anyone curious about the "bigger picture" of migration flows; however, those seeking a simplistic theoretical synthesis that would account for the myriad patterns of human migrations over the ...


[Review Of] Claudia Koonz. The Nazi Conscience, Gregory Paul Wegner Jan 2003

[Review Of] Claudia Koonz. The Nazi Conscience, Gregory Paul Wegner

Ethnic Studies Review

As the author observed in this engaging work, the expression "Nazi conscience" is not an oxymoron. Nazi morality, profoundly ethnic in nature, sharply defined those accepted and rejected as members of the German Volk. Claudia Koonz describes with great clarity the emergence of an "ethnic fundamentalism" supported by numerous "ethnocrats" under the Third Reich who, during the "normal years" of 1933-1 939, advanced decidedly racial and biological perspectives on ethnicity (141, 217). Especially significant for our understanding of Nazi racial policy is Koonz's exploration of German public opinion, much of which reflected an abhorrence of Nazi brutality. What made ...


[Review Of] Teodros Kiros, Ed. Explorations In African Political Thought: Identity, Community, Ethics, Ashton Wesley Welch Jan 2003

[Review Of] Teodros Kiros, Ed. Explorations In African Political Thought: Identity, Community, Ethics, Ashton Wesley Welch

Ethnic Studies Review

Explorations in African Political Thought: Identity, Community, Ethics is a collection of ten essays written both by newcomers and by well-known African philosophers. Most of the authors are currently teaching in American universities. It is part of the growing literature that cements African philosophy as an integral part of the discipline of philosophy while charting new venues for the field. The objective of this book is to illustrate that African philosophy can serve African people as a moralactivity guided by the principles of practical reason in addressing the underlying problems of African economic, political, and social institutions. Teodros Kiros, the ...


Contributors Jan 2003

Contributors

Ethnic Studies Review

Contributors to Ethnic Studies Review, Vol. 26, No. 1, April 2003.


Table Of Contents Jan 2003

Table Of Contents

Ethnic Studies Review

Table of Contents for Ethnic Studies Review, Vol. 26, No. 1, April 2003.


Editor's Note, Faythe Turner Jan 2003

Editor's Note, Faythe Turner

Ethnic Studies Review

This issue of Ethnic Studies Review reflects the important critical work being done in the field of ethnic literature, an indication that this literature is getting the attention it deserves.


Getting Into The Game: The Trickster In American Ethnic Fiction, Helen Lock Jan 2003

Getting Into The Game: The Trickster In American Ethnic Fiction, Helen Lock

Ethnic Studies Review

Trickster novels, especially those by Gerald Vizenor and Maxine Hong Kingston, can be used to destabilize and undermine ethnic stereotypes. As many studies show, the trickster him/herself cannot be stable and thus resists the limitations of definition as the embodiment of ambiguity. Both insider and outsider, s/he plays with the whole concept of "sides" so as to erase the distinction between them. The trickster plays the game, including the game of language, in order to break and exploit its rules and thus destabilizes linguistic markers. Kingston and Vizenor use their novels to subvert the rules of the linguistic ...


Middle Passage To Freedom: Black Atlantic Consciousness In Charles Johnson's Middle Passage And S. I. Martin's Incomparable World, Robert Nowatzki Jan 2003

Middle Passage To Freedom: Black Atlantic Consciousness In Charles Johnson's Middle Passage And S. I. Martin's Incomparable World, Robert Nowatzki

Ethnic Studies Review

Charles Johnson's novel, Middle Passage, and S.I. Martin's novel, Incomparable World, illustrate through mobile, culturally hybrid protagonists Paul Gilroy's notion of Black Atlantic consciousness, which is based on cultural hybridity and physical mobility across the Atlantic between Europe and Africa, America and the Caribbean. I argue that both novels blur the line between freedom and slavery, between oppressed and oppressor, and disrupt the links between blackness and slavery, between mobility and freedom. In both novels the diasporic Black Atlantic experiences privilege masculinity, since neither novel includes black women who can experience the mobility that the male ...


‘The Story You Were Telling Us' Re-Reading Love In Alice Walker's By The Light Of My Father's Smile Through Luce Irigaray's Theory, Özlem Görey Jan 2003

‘The Story You Were Telling Us' Re-Reading Love In Alice Walker's By The Light Of My Father's Smile Through Luce Irigaray's Theory, Özlem Görey

Ethnic Studies Review

This article considers Alice Walker's novel By the Light of My Father's Smile in the light of the theories of French feminist Luce Irigaray. It concentrates particularly on the redefinition of love through the creation of a maternal genealogy. It explores how the severe punishment of one of the daughters, as a result of her love affair with a young Indian boy, results in the deep scarring of all the family for the rest of their lives. Interpreting this traumatic event as a metaphorical Oedipal break from the mother, this discussion aims to show the ways in which ...


Transcending The 'Tragic Mulatto': The Intersection Of Black And Indian Heritage In Contemporary Literature, Lindsey Claire Smith Jan 2003

Transcending The 'Tragic Mulatto': The Intersection Of Black And Indian Heritage In Contemporary Literature, Lindsey Claire Smith

Ethnic Studies Review

The supposed plight of multi-racial persons is widely depicted in modern American literature, including the works of William Faulkner, whose stories follow the lives of multi-racial characters such as Joe Christmas and Sam Fathers, who, reflecting characteristics of "tragic mulatto" figures, search for acceptance in a racially polarized Mississippi society. Yet more contemporary literature, including works by Michael Dorris, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toni Morrison, and Clarence Major, reference the historical relationship between African Americans and American Indians, featuring multi-racial characters that more successfully fit the fabric of current American culture than do more "traditional" works such as Faulkner's. While ...


Chinatown Black Tigers: Black Masculinity And Chinese Heroism In Frank Chin's Gunga Din Highway, Crystal S. Anderson Jan 2003

Chinatown Black Tigers: Black Masculinity And Chinese Heroism In Frank Chin's Gunga Din Highway, Crystal S. Anderson

Ethnic Studies Review

Images of ominous villains and asexual heroes in literature and mainstream American culture tend to relegate Asian American men to limited expressions of masculinity. These emasculating images deny Asian American men elements of traditional masculinity, including agency and strength. Many recognize the efforts of Frank Chin, a Chinese American novelist, to confront, expose, and revise such images by relying on a tradition of Chinese heroism. In Gunga Din Highway (1994), however, Chin creates an Asian American masculinity based on elements of both the Chinese heroic tradition and a distinct brand of African American masculinity manifested in the work of Ishmael ...


Time Is Not A River' The Implications Of Mumbo Jumbo's Pendulum Chronology For Coalition Politics, Tamiko Fiona Nimura Jan 2003

Time Is Not A River' The Implications Of Mumbo Jumbo's Pendulum Chronology For Coalition Politics, Tamiko Fiona Nimura

Ethnic Studies Review

Ismael Reed's 1972 novel, Mumbo Jumbo, proposes a unique chronological theory that requires a multiple-grounded understanding of time. An analysis of what could be called this "pendulum" chronology leads to a more complete understanding of the novel and has important implications for a coalition of American ethnic studies and other identity-related work in the academy.


Breaking The Rules: Innovation And Narrative Strategies In Sandra Cisneros' The House On Mango Street And Ana Castillo's The Mixquiahuala Letters, Carmen Haydée Rivera Jan 2003

Breaking The Rules: Innovation And Narrative Strategies In Sandra Cisneros' The House On Mango Street And Ana Castillo's The Mixquiahuala Letters, Carmen Haydée Rivera

Ethnic Studies Review

Conventional approaches to literary genres conspicuously imply definition and classification. From the very beginning of our incursions into the literary world we learn to identify and differentiate a poem from a play, a short story from a novel. As readers we classify each written work into one of these neatly defined literary genres by following basic guidelines. Either we classify according to the structure of the work (stanza; stage direction/dialogue; narrative) or the length (short story; novelette; novel). What happens though when a reader encounters a work of considerable length made up of individual short pieces or vignettes that ...


Ethnic Studies Review Jan 2003

Ethnic Studies Review

Ethnic Studies Review

No abstract provided.


The Politics Of Faith In The Work Of Lorna Dee Cervantes, Ana Castillo, And Sandra Cisneros, Darlene Pagan Jan 2003

The Politics Of Faith In The Work Of Lorna Dee Cervantes, Ana Castillo, And Sandra Cisneros, Darlene Pagan

Ethnic Studies Review

If Chicanas are perceived as a communal threat because they are closer to the carnal, according to the Church, they paradoxically are worshipped as the female divine within indigenous practices like Yoruba or Mexica as well. In the works of Sandra Cisneros, Ana Castillo, and Lorna Dee Cervantes women's religious commitment is revealed through their possible responses to cultural multiplicity: 1) the rejection of one tradition over another, 2) syncretism, or 3) the continual migration between practices despite contradictory impulses. Using irony to address the tension and seeming impossibility of maintaining distinct traditions simultaneously, these writers intimate how women ...


(Dis)Claiming Identity: Christina García’S The Agüero Sisters And Julia Alvarez' How The García Girls Lost Their Accents, Özlem Ögüt Jan 2003

(Dis)Claiming Identity: Christina García’S The Agüero Sisters And Julia Alvarez' How The García Girls Lost Their Accents, Özlem Ögüt

Ethnic Studies Review

Christine Garcia's The Aguero Sisters and Julia Alvarez's How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents are novels that revolve around the conflicts and tensions among the members of the two immigrant families, the Aguero sisters from Cuba and the Garcia sisters from the Dominican Republic, arising mainly from their need to come to terms with their ambiguous identities. This article focuses on the ways in which the Aguero and Garcia sisters through their hybrid identities overcome boundaries and exclusive categories so as to challenge homogenizing, hegemonic systems, and open vistas into new, non-essentialist modes of identity that still ...


[Review Of] Matibag, Eugenio. Haitian-Dominican Counterpoint, Gerry R. Cox Jan 2003

[Review Of] Matibag, Eugenio. Haitian-Dominican Counterpoint, Gerry R. Cox

Ethnic Studies Review

Those unfamiliar with the Dominican Republic and Haiti would probably think that the two countries with their different languages and cultures are distinct and separate historically as they are culturally. The French and African heritage of Haiti is often contrasted with the Spanish heritage of the Dominican Republic. Matibag demonstrates that the two cultures and nations are intertwined at a level that would surprise even the informed scholar.


[Review Of] Jun Xing And Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, Eds. Reversing The Lens: Ethnicity, Race, Gender, And Sexuality Through Film, Susan Crutchfield Jan 2003

[Review Of] Jun Xing And Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, Eds. Reversing The Lens: Ethnicity, Race, Gender, And Sexuality Through Film, Susan Crutchfield

Ethnic Studies Review

The fourteen essays collected in Xing and Hirabayashi's new volume make a strong argument for serious intellectual work involved not only in the college-level study of moving images for their messages about minority groups but also in pedagogical approaches that take film and video as their primary texts. Written by a collection of scholars who work in ethnic and racial studies and various allied fields, the essays share a concern with pedagogy and with showing "how visual media can be used to facilitate cross-cultural understanding and communications, particularly with respect to the thorny topics of ethnicity and race" (3 ...


Table Of Contents Jan 2003

Table Of Contents

Ethnic Studies Review

Table of Contents for Ethnic Studies Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, April 2003.


Editor's Note, Faythe Turner Jan 2003

Editor's Note, Faythe Turner

Ethnic Studies Review

In its larger contexts the topic of this issue of Ethnic Studies Review, "Fair Access," has many referents. In 2004 we are marking the fiftieth anniversary of Brown v Board of Education which stated unequivocally that separate but equal systems of education did not and could not exist, and yet equal education for all our children still does not exist. Recent reports detail that in many urban areas school systems are at least as segregated as prior to the Brown decision, and all levels of government seem satisfied with that status quo. We watch with astonishment as over six hundred ...


Ethnic Studies Review Jan 2003

Ethnic Studies Review

Ethnic Studies Review

No abstract provided.


Contributors Jan 2003

Contributors

Ethnic Studies Review

Contributors to Ethnic Studies Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, April 2003.