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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Stickiness As Methodological Condition, Cala Coats Sep 2020

Stickiness As Methodological Condition, Cala Coats

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

Stickiness is introduced as a cultural concept, affective condition, and performative practice. The author suggests a process of methodological conditioning rooted in responsiveness and attunement in response to shared vulnerability embedded in precarity. Drawing from Felix Guattari’s ethico-aesthetic paradigm, new materialisms, and affect theory, the author invites readers to engage with a narrative score as an aesthetic pedagogical exercise. The score and additional provocations act as creative material for connective and collective performances tracing and creating encounters across time and space.


“You’Re Almost In This Place That Doesn’T Exist”: The Impact Of College In Prison As Understood By Formerly Incarcerated Students From The Northeastern United States, Hilary Binda, Jill D. Weinberg, Nora Maetzener, Carolyn Rubin Jun 2020

“You’Re Almost In This Place That Doesn’T Exist”: The Impact Of College In Prison As Understood By Formerly Incarcerated Students From The Northeastern United States, Hilary Binda, Jill D. Weinberg, Nora Maetzener, Carolyn Rubin

Journal of Prison Education and Reentry

This qualitative study examines the immediate and lasting impact of liberal arts higher education in prison from the perspective of former college-in-prison students from the Northeastern United States. Findings obtained through semi-structured interviews with formerly incarcerated people are presented in the following three areas: self-confidence and agency, interpersonal relationships, and capacity for civic leadership. This study further examines former students’ reflections on the relationship between education and human transformation and begins to benchmark college programming with attention to the potential for such transformation. The authors identify four characteristics critical to a program’s success: academic rigor, the professor's respect ...


Network Modeling The Impact Of Community-Based Male-Screening On The Chlamydia Trachomatis Prevalence In Women, Zhuolin Qu May 2020

Network Modeling The Impact Of Community-Based Male-Screening On The Chlamydia Trachomatis Prevalence In Women, Zhuolin Qu

Biology and Medicine Through Mathematics Conference

No abstract provided.


A Mathematical Model To Study The Crime Dynamics Spread Within Minority Communities, Maila Brucal-Hallare, Beatriz Cuartas, Anne Fernando, Ana Vivas-Barber May 2020

A Mathematical Model To Study The Crime Dynamics Spread Within Minority Communities, Maila Brucal-Hallare, Beatriz Cuartas, Anne Fernando, Ana Vivas-Barber

Biology and Medicine Through Mathematics Conference

No abstract provided.


Innovative Phone-In Radio Program For Prisoners Enrolled As Students At Indira Gandhi National Open University, Sivaswaroop Pathaneni Dr Mar 2020

Innovative Phone-In Radio Program For Prisoners Enrolled As Students At Indira Gandhi National Open University, Sivaswaroop Pathaneni Dr

Journal of Prison Education and Reentry

Providing education to prisoners while in jail is a win-win situation for both prisoners and society. For prisoners, the educational experiences in jail reduce their mental strain, isolation, and stress due to incarceration and simultaneously make them employment ready after their release from prison. Education helps prisoners become fit to earn on their own, and thereby reduces the chances of returning to jail (recidivism). Therefore, through educational experiences, the government saves money on prisoners' maintenance and earns taxes from their later employment. Providing education to prisoners, especially increasing efforts to provide quality education, such as is available to common students ...


An Organizational Analysis Of Foreign National Prisoners’ Participation Possibilities In Flanders (Belgium), Dorien Brosens, Flore Croux, Bart Claes, Stijn Vandevelde, Liesbeth De Donder Jan 2020

An Organizational Analysis Of Foreign National Prisoners’ Participation Possibilities In Flanders (Belgium), Dorien Brosens, Flore Croux, Bart Claes, Stijn Vandevelde, Liesbeth De Donder

Journal of Prison Education and Reentry

This mixed-method study first provides insight into the Belgian prison population — particularly foreign national prisoners — based on an analysis of the penal database SIDIS Suite (N = 10,356). Second, qualitative telephone interviews have been conducted with the activity coordinators of all Flemish and Brussels prisons (N = 17) to investigate which prison activities (e.g., cultural, educational, and health-related activities, sports, vocational training, and forensic welfare services) are available to, and accessible by foreign national prisoners. This article demonstrates several initiatives that have been taken to enhance foreign nationals’ participation in prison activities and highlights the struggles that activity coordinators face ...


“I See You Have Been Convicted Of A Felony; Can You Tell Me About That?” Workforce Development Challenges For Restorative Citizens Seeking Employment, Terrance Hinton Jan 2020

“I See You Have Been Convicted Of A Felony; Can You Tell Me About That?” Workforce Development Challenges For Restorative Citizens Seeking Employment, Terrance Hinton

Journal of Prison Education and Reentry

Incarceration has been an issue nationwide in the United States for decades due to policies from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s that lead to mass increases in incarceration. In the past decade, several states have overhauled their criminal sentencing and prison structure to lower prison populations. This has resulted in the release of thousands of restorative citizens and has expanded the need for reentry services. Released individuals who have been incarcerated face a number of social, political, and economic barriers that prevent them from re-entering society successfully. The inability to obtain employment is often cited as one of the most ...


Going Ashore In Thule, David Schlitz Jan 2020

Going Ashore In Thule, David Schlitz

Mighty Pen Project Anthology & Archive

A Coast Guard member aboard The Westwind recounts his team’s adventures during the summer of 1961 in Thule.

This piece was written by a student of the Mighty Pen Project. The Mighty Pen Project is an organization based in Richmond, Virginia, that offers a classroom experience for veterans to learn how to write and, if they so choose, share their own stories.


Moaner, David Aldridge Jan 2020

Moaner, David Aldridge

Mighty Pen Project Anthology & Archive

Every unit in the military has one of these, it seems, the constant complainer. This one in Vietnam learned a tough lesson.

This piece was written by a student of the Mighty Pen Project. The Mighty Pen Project is an organization based in Richmond, Virginia, that offers a classroom experience for veterans to learn how to write and, if they so choose, share their own stories.


Improving Access To Care In Virginia: Reaching Nurse Practitioner Training Capacity Through Preceptor Incentives, Debra Barksdale, Christine Kennedy, Shelly Smith Jan 2020

Improving Access To Care In Virginia: Reaching Nurse Practitioner Training Capacity Through Preceptor Incentives, Debra Barksdale, Christine Kennedy, Shelly Smith

Translational Research Fellows Policy Briefs

Workforce data reinforces the notion that educating nurse practitioners in Virginia is critical in helping to improve access to care in the Commonwealth, particularly in underserved communities. Six of Virginia’s thirty-nine state funded colleges and universities offer nurse practitioner programs. All of these universities report their capacity to train nurse practitioners is not limited by qualified applicants but rather by a shortage of clinical preceptors. This paper provides a summary of public policy initiatives that support preceptors as an example for Virginia to consider.


Community Input On An Enhanced Care Planning Tool Addressing Health Behaviors, Mental Health Needs, And Social Risks, Kristen O'Loughlin, Hannah Shadowen, Paulette Lail Kashiri, Alex Krist Jan 2020

Community Input On An Enhanced Care Planning Tool Addressing Health Behaviors, Mental Health Needs, And Social Risks, Kristen O'Loughlin, Hannah Shadowen, Paulette Lail Kashiri, Alex Krist

Graduate Research Posters

Background: Many patients with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have social risks, mental health needs, and/or unhealthy behaviors. These interfere with their ability to manage their MCC. A care planning tool was created to help address these needs; this study solicited feedback from stakeholder groups and incorporated it into improving the tool.

Methods: Instrument: The Enhanced Care Planning (ECP) tool screens patients for social risks, mental health needs, and unhealthy behaviors. They are shown where their responses revealed risk, then select 1-2 to improve upon. Next, patients set personal goals and select strategies to support them. Patients are supported by ...


Empowering Latina/O Families To Navigate College Access, Maria De Jesus Cisneros-Elias, Gabriela Chavira, Karen Alvarez Jan 2020

Empowering Latina/O Families To Navigate College Access, Maria De Jesus Cisneros-Elias, Gabriela Chavira, Karen Alvarez

Graduate Research Posters

Background

With the education crisis of Latinas/os, it is important to understand ways to increase access to college for the most vulnerable youth (Gándara & Contreras, 2009). To investigate strengths that promote college accessibility in underserved Latina/o families, the current qualitative study assessed the following: (1) Prior to beginning the intervention program and after the intervention program what forms of capital did families possess? (2) How did participating in the program change adolescents’ perception of their parents’ capital? (3) How did adolescents use agency to apply what they learned in college information intervention over time?

Methods

Latina/o parent-adolescent ...


Legal Status Effects On Parent-Child Relationships And Parent Well-Being, Isis Garcia-Rodriguez, Tamara Ribas-Camargo, Ronald L. Blackwell, Amy K. Marks Jan 2020

Legal Status Effects On Parent-Child Relationships And Parent Well-Being, Isis Garcia-Rodriguez, Tamara Ribas-Camargo, Ronald L. Blackwell, Amy K. Marks

Graduate Research Posters

Despite heightened levels of parenting stress and psychological distress experienced by many immigrant-origin families in the United States, little is known about the resiliency of Latinx families, particularly in today’s political climate. This research presents the results of a pilot study examining the effects of legal stressors on parent-child relationships and parent well-being in Latinx immigrant families. Taken from the Latinx Immigrant Family Stories and Strengths project, this mixed-methods study was informed by the integrative risk and resilience model for understanding the adaptation of immigrant-origin children and youth (Suarez-Orozco, Motti- Stefanidi, Marks, & Katsiaficas, 2018). The pilot included a sample of 30 adult parent participants with various legal statuses and migration experiences. Qualitatively, participants shared their experiences of legal vulnerability, fears or concerns of deportation, and coping mechanisms. Quantitatively, scores for parental stress, psychological distress, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and resilience were collected. Following a, sequential explanatory design (Creswell et al., 2003), quantitative data were analyzed for relationships among study variables. A case-oriented research comparative strategy (Eckstein, 1975; Mahoney & Goertz, 2004; George & Bennett, 2005; Gerring, 2006) was then used ...


Predicting Caregiver Burden Over The First 4 Months After Tbi In Latin America: A Multi-Site, Multi-Country Study, Mickeal Pugh Jr., Paul B. Perrin, Yaneth Rodriguez, Silvia Olivera, Maria Cristina Quijano, Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla Jan 2020

Predicting Caregiver Burden Over The First 4 Months After Tbi In Latin America: A Multi-Site, Multi-Country Study, Mickeal Pugh Jr., Paul B. Perrin, Yaneth Rodriguez, Silvia Olivera, Maria Cristina Quijano, Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla

Graduate Research Posters

Disparities in TBI exist between developed and developing regions, and this neurological condition typically requires caregivers to provide aid and functional support for those with TBI (Hyder, Wunderlich, Puvanachandra, Gururaj, & Kobusingye, 2007). Latin America, among these global regions, has elevated risks of both sustaining TBI and poorer post-TBI functioning (Bonow et al., 2018). Previous literature has shown the poor cognitive, mental health, and social functional outcomes following the injury (Deloche, Dellatolas, & Christensen, 2000), but research has minimally explored both longitudinal trends of these outcomes, and if functional outcomes of the injury differentially predict caregiver burden. The aim of the current ...


Daily Sleep Quality Is Associated With Daily Cognition In Late-Life, Emily K. Donovan, Joseph M. Dzierzewski, Constance H. Fung, Karen R. Josephson, Cathy A. Alessi, Jennifer L. Martin Jan 2020

Daily Sleep Quality Is Associated With Daily Cognition In Late-Life, Emily K. Donovan, Joseph M. Dzierzewski, Constance H. Fung, Karen R. Josephson, Cathy A. Alessi, Jennifer L. Martin

Graduate Research Posters

Background: Older adults often face sleep disturbance or cognitive decline that goes beyond the scope of normal aging. The present study examined the relationship between self-reported sleep quality and self-reported daytime attention in a community-dwelling sample of older men at the between-persons and within-persons levels of association.

Methods: Thirty-eight participants (M age =75.36 years, SD age =7.51 years, range=66-90 years) completed a twice-daily sleep diary for one week. Sleep quality and attention were assessed using a single-item 0-10 rating scales from the morning diary (“How was the quality of your sleep last night?”) and from the evening ...


Screening For Cognitive Impairment In Primary Brain Tumor Patients: A Preliminary Investigation With The Mmse And Rbans, Farah Aslanzadeh, M.S., Sarah Braun, M.S, Julia Brechbiel, M.S., Kelcie Willis, M.S., Kyra Parker, Autumn Lanoye, Phd, Ashlee Loughan, Phd Jan 2020

Screening For Cognitive Impairment In Primary Brain Tumor Patients: A Preliminary Investigation With The Mmse And Rbans, Farah Aslanzadeh, M.S., Sarah Braun, M.S, Julia Brechbiel, M.S., Kelcie Willis, M.S., Kyra Parker, Autumn Lanoye, Phd, Ashlee Loughan, Phd

Graduate Research Posters

Introduction: The prevalence of mild cognition impairment (MCI) among older adults (≥65) is estimated to range between 10-20% (Langa & Levine, 2014). Integrated primary care allows opportunities for interdisciplinary consultation, screening, and intervention. The aim of this study is to explore the percentage of older adults reporting cognitive concerns during their first primary care psychology visits. It is hypothesized that these rates will mirror prevalence rates in other older adult community dwelling samples in primary care settings.

Methods: A patient sample of older adults (≥60) was introduced to services following a referral from their primary care physician. Clinicians then identified problems that were discussed in session, including “cognitive concerns.” Descriptive statistics will be used to assess the percentage of older adults with “cognitive concerns” in this sample, compared to other community dwelling samples.

Results: 267 older adults were identified within a larger sample of patients who received primary care psychology services. The percentage of older adults who were referred for “cognitive concerns” was 10.5% (n = 28), with 12.7% (n = 34) reporting “cognitive concerns” during their visit. Interestingly of the 28 older adults referred by their provider for “cognitive concerns,” less than 50% (n = 13) of those patients reported “cognitive concerns” as one of their problems in session.

Discussion: This sample of older adults reported cognitive concerns in primary care psychology sessions at a rate that falls within the range identified in other community dwelling samples. Future research could further improve upon identification and screening of older adults with cognitive concerns by psychologists in primary care settings, as intervention for MCI can improve quality of life and may delay progression of dementia (Campbell et al., 2018; Eshkoor et al., 2015).


Contextual Emotion Expression: Profiles Of African American Report In The Family And On Campus, Deon Brown, Fantasy Lozada, Zewelanji Serpell, Vivian Dzokoto Jan 2020

Contextual Emotion Expression: Profiles Of African American Report In The Family And On Campus, Deon Brown, Fantasy Lozada, Zewelanji Serpell, Vivian Dzokoto

Graduate Research Posters

Background: African American culture has long been known for its emphasis on emotion expression (Boykin, 1986). However, African Americans have learned to restrict emotion publicly due to pervasive stereotypes (Consedine & Magai, 2002). It’s likely that such behavior is learned in the family, in which parents alert children to racial discrimination that is typically associated with context (Dunbar et al., 2017). Thus, African Americans are likely to vary emotion expression according to context. The current study explored emotion expression in the family and public context.

Methods: 188 African American/Black college students from 3 different types of college campuses. The sample was 62.4% female, 35.4% male, and 2.2. genderqueer/gender non- conforming. Data were collected via an online survey with all self-report measures. Contextual differences in emotion expression were explored via latent profile analysis (LPA).

Results: Five profiles emerged: More Positive and Negative Submissive Expression (n = 49; 26%), More Family Expression (n = 8; 5%), Low Family and Campus Expression (n = 24; 13%), More Campus Positive and Negative Dominant Expression (n = 45; 24%), and More Positive and Less Negative Dominant Expression (n = 63; 33%). Racial discrimination significantly predicted profile membership for the More Campus Positive and Negative Dominant Expression profile in particular.

Conclusions: African American youth express emotion differently in the family context compared to campus, particularly in ...


The Associations Between Sexual Victimization And Health Outcomes Among Lgbqa College Students: Examining The Moderating Role Of Social Support, Eryn Delaney, Chelsea Derlan Williams, Della V. Mosley, Sage E. Hawn, Danielle M. Dick, Phd Jan 2020

The Associations Between Sexual Victimization And Health Outcomes Among Lgbqa College Students: Examining The Moderating Role Of Social Support, Eryn Delaney, Chelsea Derlan Williams, Della V. Mosley, Sage E. Hawn, Danielle M. Dick, Phd

Graduate Research Posters

Sexual victimization is a prevailing public health concern that differentially impacts sexual minority populations (i.e., people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, asexual, or queer) compared with their heterosexual and cisgender counterparts (McCauley et al., 2018). Studies have shown that sexual violence is associated with depressive symptoms, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, and alcohol use (Aosved et al., 2011; Bedard-Gilligan et al, 2011; Carey et al., 2018) among heterosexual college students. However, we know less about the potential effects of sexual victimization on health outcomes among sexual minority college students. Understanding these relations are especially important because sexual minority college ...


Life Satisfaction: Measurement Invariance And Correlations With Adolescent Adjustment, Sarah K. Pittman, Robert F. Valois, Albert D. Farrell Jan 2020

Life Satisfaction: Measurement Invariance And Correlations With Adolescent Adjustment, Sarah K. Pittman, Robert F. Valois, Albert D. Farrell

Graduate Research Posters

Background

Low life satisfaction during adolescence has been associated with adjustment problems. There are few well-validated measures available to assess adolescents’ life-satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure of the Life Satisfaction Scale, evaluate its measurement invariance across sex and race/ethnicity, and investigate its associations with related constructs.

Methods

Participants were 3,340 adolescents from rural middle schools in Florida. Half the participants were female, 51% were White, 15% were Black, and 22% were Latinx. Adolescents completed the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Children’s Report of Exposure to Violence scale, and the Problem Behavior Frequency ...


Expressed Emotion, Mental Health, And Functioning In Families Of Children With And Without Asthma, Katherine W. Dempster, Julia Scheidemantel, Jessica Greenlee, Marcia A. Winter, Ph.D, Robin S. Everhart, Ph.D Jan 2020

Expressed Emotion, Mental Health, And Functioning In Families Of Children With And Without Asthma, Katherine W. Dempster, Julia Scheidemantel, Jessica Greenlee, Marcia A. Winter, Ph.D, Robin S. Everhart, Ph.D

Graduate Research Posters

Introduction: Expressed emotion (EE), the affective attitudes and behaviors of one toward another, can affect caregivers’ behaviors toward their child. Research examining associations between EE and child/family outcomes is mixed; these associations may be affected by other influences such as the presence of a chronic disease or parent mental health. In this study of families living in an urban area, we examined associations between EE and child outcomes (anxiety/depressive symptoms) and family functioning, with parent anxiety as a covariate. We evaluated child asthma status as a moderator in these associations as the presence of a chronic illness may ...


Understanding Alzheimer’S Disease Knowledge In Low-Income, Richmond, Va Community Dwelling Older Adults, Taylor Wilkerson, Ann Rhodes, Jennifer Inker, Joann Richardson, Faika Zanjani Jan 2020

Understanding Alzheimer’S Disease Knowledge In Low-Income, Richmond, Va Community Dwelling Older Adults, Taylor Wilkerson, Ann Rhodes, Jennifer Inker, Joann Richardson, Faika Zanjani

Graduate Research Posters

Background: Different populations of individuals demonstrate varying levels of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) knowledge, as well as commonly held misconceptions about the nature of the disease and its risk factors. Older adults often demonstrate lower scores on Alzheimer’s disease knowledge scales and African American adults are often specifically not aware of their higher Alzheimer’s risk status compared to other racial groups. In addition, African American older adults are more likely to receive the fewest AD interventions. Methods: We measured the Alzheimer’s knowledge of twenty community-dwelling elders at two separate time points (baseline and 6 month follow-up) as ...


Development Of A Targeted And Controlled Nanoparticle Delivery System For Foxo1 Inhibitors, Andrea Ferrer Vega, Michael Imondo, Andriy Mulyar, Bridget T. Mcinnes, Zhiyong Cheng, Nastassja Lewinski Jan 2020

Development Of A Targeted And Controlled Nanoparticle Delivery System For Foxo1 Inhibitors, Andrea Ferrer Vega, Michael Imondo, Andriy Mulyar, Bridget T. Mcinnes, Zhiyong Cheng, Nastassja Lewinski

Graduate Research Posters

Background: Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) are polymers approved by the United States’ Food and Drug Administration. Drugs for various medical treatments have been encapsulated in PLGA-PEG nanoparticles for targeted delivery and reduction of unwanted side effects.

Methods: A flow synthesis method for PLGA-PEG nanoparticles containing FoxO1 inhibitors and adipose vasculature targeting agents was developed. A set of nanoparticles including PLGA and PLGA-PEG-P3 unloaded and drug loaded were generated. The particles were characterized by DLS, fluorescence spectroscopy, TEM, and dialysis. Endotoxin levels were measured using the LAL chromogenic assay. Our approach was compared to over 270 research ...


Food Choice As A Signal Of Racial Identity, Danyel Smith, Shawn C.T. Jones, Phd, Nao Hagiwara,Phd Jan 2020

Food Choice As A Signal Of Racial Identity, Danyel Smith, Shawn C.T. Jones, Phd, Nao Hagiwara,Phd

Graduate Research Posters

Objectives: This study experimentally assessed food preference as one potentially important racial identity cue particularly for Black Americans, which in turn impacts interpersonal relations both between ethnicities/races (i.e., inter-group) and within ethnicity/race (i.e., intra-group). We hypothesized that preference for “Soul Food,” which is historically significant to Black Americans, as opposed to “Fresh Salad,” would be associated with stronger racial identity and induce more positive reactions among Black participants but more negative reactions among White participants.

Methods: Undergraduate students (N = 365) viewed one of four online profiles that were ostensibly completed by a Black Student. Student gender ...


Empirical Relationships Among Trauma Exposure, Anxiety Sensitivity, And Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Sandra Yankah, Michael Southam-Gerow, Samantha Dehart, Payton Beam Jan 2020

Empirical Relationships Among Trauma Exposure, Anxiety Sensitivity, And Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Sandra Yankah, Michael Southam-Gerow, Samantha Dehart, Payton Beam

Graduate Research Posters

This review synthesized and critically reviewed empirical studies that assessed relationships among trauma exposure, anxiety sensitivity (AS), and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Across the literature, the prominent theory conceptualized anxiety sensitivity as a causal risk factor within two competing models. One model posited that individuals with dispositionally high AS prior to experiencing a potentially traumatizing event (PTE) have a greater likelihood of developing PTSD after trauma exposure. The second model theorized that the introduction of a PTE raises an individual’s baseline level of AS, leading to the development and maintenance of PTSD symptoms. Emerging research highlighted the possibility ...


Shedding Psychological Light On The Racial Disparities In School Disciplinary Measures: The Role Of Dehumanization As A Potential Mechanism, Ebony Lambert, Nao Hagiwara Jan 2020

Shedding Psychological Light On The Racial Disparities In School Disciplinary Measures: The Role Of Dehumanization As A Potential Mechanism, Ebony Lambert, Nao Hagiwara

Graduate Research Posters

Schools should be safe and supportive spaces for all students, yet Black students tend to face biased treatment in the education system, which often results in harsh disciplinary measures. This research examined the role of animalistic dehumanization (i.e., perceiving others as animal- like and uncultured and denying uniquely human characteristics), in predicting choice of harsher disciplinary measures for Black students as opposed to White students. It was hypothesized that individuals who dehumanize Black students to a greater degree would be more likely to believe that Black students need to be disciplined through harsher measures. Both Study 1 (in which ...


Multidimensional Recovery Among An Opioid Use Disorder Outpatient Treatment Population, Anna Beth Parlier-Ahmad, Lori Beck, Caitlin E. Martin Jan 2020

Multidimensional Recovery Among An Opioid Use Disorder Outpatient Treatment Population, Anna Beth Parlier-Ahmad, Lori Beck, Caitlin E. Martin

Graduate Research Posters

Background: Given the current opioid crisis, recovery from opioid use disorder (OUD) warrants attention. SAMHSA’s working definition of recovery highlights dimensions that support recovery including health, home, community, and purpose. Recovery capital captures factors that support recovery within these dimensions and has been associated with recovery outcomes. Prior research highlights possible gender differences in recovery outcomes. Objective: 1) Describe and compare recovery capital among an OUD outpatient treatment population by gender; 2) Identify the relationship between recovery capital and length of time in treatment within this population.

Methods: Patients (n=126) taking medication for OUD at a single outpatient ...


Gene-By-Intervention Effects On Alcohol Dependence Symptoms In Emerging Adulthood, Zoe E. Neale, Sally I. Kuo, Fazil Aliev, Peter B. Barr, Jinni Su, Kit K. Elam, Thao Ha, Kathryn Lemery-Chalfant, Danielle M. Dick Jan 2020

Gene-By-Intervention Effects On Alcohol Dependence Symptoms In Emerging Adulthood, Zoe E. Neale, Sally I. Kuo, Fazil Aliev, Peter B. Barr, Jinni Su, Kit K. Elam, Thao Ha, Kathryn Lemery-Chalfant, Danielle M. Dick

Graduate Research Posters

The Importance of Peer Influence for LGBTQ+ Youth in Rural Communities

Aaron Kemmerer

supported by findings from Safe as Yourself (SAY) Project

Traci Wike (PI), Leah Bouchard, Maurico Yabar, and Aaron Kemmerer

Objectives: To explore the experiences and narratives of LGBTQ+ youth in rural North Carolina. To elaborate on the influence of peer support and impact of peer victimization for LGBTQ+ youth in rural North Carolina.

Methods: Data was collected from eleven young people who were interviewed from 2019-2020 at an LGBTQ+ youth center in rural North Carolina. The interviews were coded and analyzed using narrative analysis on a team ...


Emotion Regulation And Prosocial Tendencies Mediate The Association Between Parenting Styles And Later Substance Use, Nathaniel Thomas, Marcia Winter, The Spit For Science Working Group, Danielle Dick Jan 2020

Emotion Regulation And Prosocial Tendencies Mediate The Association Between Parenting Styles And Later Substance Use, Nathaniel Thomas, Marcia Winter, The Spit For Science Working Group, Danielle Dick

Graduate Research Posters

PURPOSE: Substance use is common, heritable, and associated with negative outcomes in emerging adults. Previous work suggests that parenting styles are associated with substance use outcomes. Emotion regulation and prosocial tendencies, such as civic efficacy and engagement with community or school extracurricular activities, are associated with lower levels of substance use and may represent mechanisms of the influence of parenting styles on substance use. The current study examines whether the association between parenting styles and substance use is mediated by emotion regulation and prosocial tendencies in a large sample of emerging adult college students

METHODS: Subjects were drawn from a ...


Let’S Talk: A Study Of The Impact Of Gendered Racial Socialization On African American Adolescent Girls’ Mental Health, Lesley Winchester, Keyona Allen, Shawn C. T. Jones, Ph.D, Elan Hope, Ph.D Jan 2020

Let’S Talk: A Study Of The Impact Of Gendered Racial Socialization On African American Adolescent Girls’ Mental Health, Lesley Winchester, Keyona Allen, Shawn C. T. Jones, Ph.D, Elan Hope, Ph.D

Graduate Research Posters

Internalized racial oppression in African American girls is understudied within research. As people of color are victimized by racism, they may internalize it, developing ideas, beliefs, actions and behaviors that support or collude with racism (Bivens, 1995). This internalized racism has its own systemic reality and its own negative consequences in the lives and communities of people of color. Understanding the way negative racial messages influence the mental health of African American adolescent girls allows for the development of intervention and prevention methods to reduce symptomology of depression, anxiety, and stress. In order for African American girls and young women ...


Is Helping Really Helping? Health-Related Quality Of Life After Tbi Predicting Caregiver Depression Longitudinally In Latin America, Chimdindu Ohayagha, Paul B. Perrin, Mickeal Pugh Jr., Yaneth Rodriguez, Silvia Olivera, Maria Cristina Quijano, Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla Jan 2020

Is Helping Really Helping? Health-Related Quality Of Life After Tbi Predicting Caregiver Depression Longitudinally In Latin America, Chimdindu Ohayagha, Paul B. Perrin, Mickeal Pugh Jr., Yaneth Rodriguez, Silvia Olivera, Maria Cristina Quijano, Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla

Graduate Research Posters

Objective: Studies have shown that functional and psychosocial sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI) predict emotional well-being of caregivers (Harris, 2000). Previous research examining the mental health of caregivers and the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of people with TBI have primarily been in the US (Sander, 2012). Very little research has been conducted to uncover the unique relationships between HRQoL of people with TBI and caregiver mental health longitudinally, or in low-middle income Latin American countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate how HRQoL after TBI predict caregiver depression longitudinally in two countries and three data collection ...