Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

University of Wollongong

Social

2018

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Perceived Stigma And Social Support In Treatment For Pharmaceutical Opioid Dependence, Sasha Cooper, Gabrielle Campbell, Briony K. Larance, Bridin Murnion, Suzanne Nielsen Jan 2018

Perceived Stigma And Social Support In Treatment For Pharmaceutical Opioid Dependence, Sasha Cooper, Gabrielle Campbell, Briony K. Larance, Bridin Murnion, Suzanne Nielsen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Introduction and Aims The dramatic increase in pharmaceutical opioid (PO) use in high‐income countries is a growing public health concern. Stigma and social support are important as they may influence treatment uptake and outcomes, yet few studies exist regarding perceived stigma and social support among people with PO dependence. The aims of the study are to: (i) compare characteristics of those with PO dependence from iatrogenic and non‐iatrogenic causes; (ii) document perceived stigma and its correlates in people in treatment for PO dependence; and (iii) examine correlates of social support in people in treatment for PO dependence. Design ...


Low Levels Of After School-Hours Social Interaction And Physical Activity Of 5-7 Year Olds, Anita C. Bundy, Lina Engelen, Geraldine A. Naughton, Shirley Wyver Jan 2018

Low Levels Of After School-Hours Social Interaction And Physical Activity Of 5-7 Year Olds, Anita C. Bundy, Lina Engelen, Geraldine A. Naughton, Shirley Wyver

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

As part of a cluster randomized controlled trial (Bundy et al., 2017), the after school-hours activities of 5-7 year old children were recorded by parents and other adult carers on four consecutive weekdays between 3:30pm-7:00pm. Records of time use showed most time was spent indoors in activities involving low levels of physical activity. The most-frequently-recorded activity was screen time, accounting for approximately one quarter of all activities. Higher levels of physical activity were reported when children were outdoors (19.5% of time) and/or with peers (9.58%). If an adult was present, highest activity levels of children ...