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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Social And Behavioral Implications Of Location-Based Services, Katina Michael, M.G. Michael Nov 2011

The Social And Behavioral Implications Of Location-Based Services, Katina Michael, M.G. Michael

Associate Professor Katina Michael

The social and behavioral implications of location-based services (LBS) are only now beginning to come to light in advanced markets where the services have been adopted by just a little over half the market (Microsoft 2011). Depending on one’s definition of what constitutes location-based services, statistics on the level of adoption differ considerably. While it is helpful to provide as broad a list of applications as possible in what constitutes LBS (e.g. everything from in-vehicle navigation systems to downloading a map using a computer), it can also cloud the real picture forming behind this emerging technology. Emerging not ...


Cognitive Ability, Right-Wing Authoritarianism, And Social Dominance Orientation: A Five-Year Longitudinal Study Amongst Adolescents, Patrick C. L. Heaven, Joseph Ciarrochi, Peter Leeson Jan 2011

Cognitive Ability, Right-Wing Authoritarianism, And Social Dominance Orientation: A Five-Year Longitudinal Study Amongst Adolescents, Patrick C. L. Heaven, Joseph Ciarrochi, Peter Leeson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Professionalism And Social Networking: Can Patients, Physicians, Nurses, And Supervisors All Be `Friends'?, Joy V. Peluchette, Katherine Karl, Alberto Coustasse, Phil Rutsohn, Dennis Emmett Jan 2011

Professionalism And Social Networking: Can Patients, Physicians, Nurses, And Supervisors All Be `Friends'?, Joy V. Peluchette, Katherine Karl, Alberto Coustasse, Phil Rutsohn, Dennis Emmett

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

This study examines the use of Facebook by certified nurse anesthetist students. Our results showed that, contrary to expectations, most were neutral about faculty, physicians, and supervisors viewing their Facebook profiles but expressed concerns about patients seeing such information. Many (30%) of our respondents had observed unprofessional content posted on the social network sites of their classmates including: intoxication or substance abuse, profanity, sexually suggestive photos or comments, and negative work-related comments. A vast majority indicated they would accept a ‘friend’ request from their supervisor and a physician but not a patient. Surprisingly, about 40% had initiated a ‘friend’ request ...


Explaining Social Exclusion In Alcolhol-Related Dementia: A Literature Review, Renee Brighton, Victoria Traynor, Janette Curtis Jan 2011

Explaining Social Exclusion In Alcolhol-Related Dementia: A Literature Review, Renee Brighton, Victoria Traynor, Janette Curtis

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Value Creation In Social Marketing For The Continued Use Of Wellness Services, Nadia Zainuddin Jan 2011

Value Creation In Social Marketing For The Continued Use Of Wellness Services, Nadia Zainuddin

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

In social marketing, in order to incentivise individuals into performing desired social behaviours, a value proposition is required (Dann, 2008; Kotler and Lee, 2008) as consumers often act out of self-interest (Rothschild, 1999). Value propositions offer relevant and timely incentives to encourage individuals to not only voluntarily perform these behaviours, but maintain these behaviours long-term. Much of the current research in value is focussed on a goods-oriented commercial marketing context, using an economic approach, which has resulted in a lack of investigation of value in a social marketing context from an experiential perspective (Holbrook, 1994), which this paper seeks to ...


Going Online For Social Change: Techniques, Barriers And Possibilities For Community Groups, Colin Salter Jan 2011

Going Online For Social Change: Techniques, Barriers And Possibilities For Community Groups, Colin Salter

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) - Papers

Going online can significantly assist a community group to meet its aims. Many open source technologies are designed to embody decentralised and collaborative authorship, facilitating a group's ability to share its message with a much broader audience - and on its terms. By reflecting on the techniques adopted by the Sandon Point Community Picket in going online, and how the approach mirrored their grassroots campaign, we can explore the how alongside the why of working for social change. Challenges faced, their implications, and what we can learn from them can also be considered.


Explaining Social Exclusion In Alcohol-Related Dementia: A Literature Review, Renee Brighton, Janette Curtis, Victoria Traynor Jan 2011

Explaining Social Exclusion In Alcohol-Related Dementia: A Literature Review, Renee Brighton, Janette Curtis, Victoria Traynor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background: The purpose of our project is to explore the lived experience of people with alcohol-related dementia and their carers to explain the impact of social exclusion. The literature review has been completed. The empirical study will be a qualitative study using narrative storylines (Keady et al., 2009) to understand the Australian experience of alcohol-related dementia. Methods: Academic and publishers’ databases (CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Wiley Interscience and SAGE) were searched using the terms: ‘alcohol-related dementia’, ‘diagnosis’, ‘carer’, ‘services’, ‘treatment’ and ‘stigma’. Snowballing techniques were also used to source papers and Google Scholar for grey literature. Findings: A total of 35 articles ...


"At Least I'M Not Drink-Driving": Formative Research For A Social Marketing Campaign To Reduce Drug-Driving Among Young Drivers, Lance R. Barrie, Sandra C. Jones, Elizabeth Wiese Jan 2011

"At Least I'M Not Drink-Driving": Formative Research For A Social Marketing Campaign To Reduce Drug-Driving Among Young Drivers, Lance R. Barrie, Sandra C. Jones, Elizabeth Wiese

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper reports on a qualitative study designed to examine young drivers’ knowledge and attitudes regarding drug-driving, as the formative research for a potential drug-driving social marketing program in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Drug driving has been found to be associated with motor vehicle accidents, particularly among younger drivers. However, the potential for social marketing in this area has received little attention. This study found that young people were not aware of the effects of drugs on driving, formed their perceptions of risk (both of getting caught and of impaired driving) based on other people’s experiences, and felt ...


The Sydney Playground Project: Popping The Bubblewrap - Unleashing The Power Of Play: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Of A Primary School Playground-Based Intervention Aiming To Increase Children's Physical Activity And Social Skills, Anita C. Bundy, Geraldine A. Naughton, Paul Tranter, Shirley Wyver, Louise A. Baur, Wendy Schiller, Adrian E. Bauman, Lina Engelen, Jo Ragen, Tim Luckett, Anita Niehues, Gabrielle Stewart, Glenda Jessup, Jennie Brentnall Jan 2011

The Sydney Playground Project: Popping The Bubblewrap - Unleashing The Power Of Play: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Of A Primary School Playground-Based Intervention Aiming To Increase Children's Physical Activity And Social Skills, Anita C. Bundy, Geraldine A. Naughton, Paul Tranter, Shirley Wyver, Louise A. Baur, Wendy Schiller, Adrian E. Bauman, Lina Engelen, Jo Ragen, Tim Luckett, Anita Niehues, Gabrielle Stewart, Glenda Jessup, Jennie Brentnall

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background In the Westernised world, numerous children are overweight and have problems with bullying and mental health. One of the underlying causes for all three is postulated to be a decrease in outdoor free play. The aim of the Sydney Playground Project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of two simple interventions aimed to increase children's physical activity and social skills. Methods/Design This study protocol describes the design of a 3-year cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT), in which schools are the clusters. The study consists of a 13-week intervention and 1 week each of pre-and post-testing. We are recruiting ...


The Early Years And Later Development: Evidence And Social Policy, Edward Melhuish Jan 2011

The Early Years And Later Development: Evidence And Social Policy, Edward Melhuish

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Keynote address at the Growing Up in Ireland Annual Research Conference, 1 December 2011, Dublin, Ireland


Decision Making In A Crowded Room: The Relational Significance Of Social Roles In Decisions To Proceed With Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Rowena Forsyth, Camilla Scanlan, Stacy M. Carter, Christopher F. Jordens, Ian Kerridge Jan 2011

Decision Making In A Crowded Room: The Relational Significance Of Social Roles In Decisions To Proceed With Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Rowena Forsyth, Camilla Scanlan, Stacy M. Carter, Christopher F. Jordens, Ian Kerridge

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Researchers studying health care decision making generally focus on the interaction that unfolds between patients and health professionals. Using the example of allogeneic bone marrow transplant, in this article we identify decision making to be a relational process concurrently underpinned by patients' engagement with health professionals, their families, and broader social networks. We argue that the person undergoing a transplant simultaneously reconciles numerous social roles throughout treatment decision making, each of which encompasses a system of mutuality, reciprocity, and obligation. As individuals enter through the doorway of the consultation room and become "patients," they do not leave their roles as ...


The Social Cost Of Blackmail, Oleg Yerokhin Jan 2011

The Social Cost Of Blackmail, Oleg Yerokhin

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

Despite the fact that blackmail constitutes a voluntary transaction between two parties, it is deemed to bea criminal offense in most legal systems. The traditional economic approach to this so-called "paradox of blackmail" emphasizes welfare loss generated by the costly rent-seeking activities of potential blackmailersas the primary justification for its criminalization. This argument, however, does not extend to cases inwhich potentially damaging information about the victim was acquired by the blackmailer at no cost. Italso does not seem to shed light on a related puzzle: why is it legal for a potential victim to bribe theother party with the purpose ...


Combining The Health Belief Model And Social Marketing To Develop A Community-Level Campaign About Asthma For Older Adults, Uwana Evers, Sandra C. Jones, Peter Caputi, Donald C. Iverson Jan 2011

Combining The Health Belief Model And Social Marketing To Develop A Community-Level Campaign About Asthma For Older Adults, Uwana Evers, Sandra C. Jones, Peter Caputi, Donald C. Iverson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This conceptual paper provides a rationale for combining health behaviour theory with a social marketing framework in order to develop a community-level asthma campaign for adults aged 55 years and older. The prevalence of asthma in older adults in Australia is approximately 10%, higher than in many other countries, and asthma mortality increases with age. In addition, older adults' perceptions of asthma causes and treatments are often inaccurate. Many older adults believe that asthma is a childhood disease and that the effects of the condition are relatively minor and would not impact on daily life. In order to address these ...


Ethnic Differences In Adolescent Mental Health Trajectories And The Influence Of Racism And Context: The Determinants Of Adolescent Social Well-Being And Health (Dash) Study, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Maria J. Maynard, Erik Lenguerrand, Seeromanie Harding Jan 2011

Ethnic Differences In Adolescent Mental Health Trajectories And The Influence Of Racism And Context: The Determinants Of Adolescent Social Well-Being And Health (Dash) Study, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Maria J. Maynard, Erik Lenguerrand, Seeromanie Harding

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Abstract presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Inaugural Conference, 22-24 September 2010, Cambridge, United Kingdom.


Governing Social Reproduction In Masterplanned Estates: Urban Politics And Everyday Life In Sydney, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Robyn Dowling Jan 2011

Governing Social Reproduction In Masterplanned Estates: Urban Politics And Everyday Life In Sydney, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Robyn Dowling

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Critical urban research arising from the 'new urban politics' rich heritage has conventionally privileged the politics of accumulation and the city's downtown over the politics of social reproduction and everyday, residential spaces. This paper focuses on residential spaces and the politics involved in recasting everyday practices of social reproduction through private neighbourhood governance. Focusing on the masterplanned estates increasingly prevalent across Sydney's residential landscape, it explores the material practices and subjectivities shaped by these estates' contractual governance and the contours and limits to the formation of self-governing middle-class consumer citizens. The paper highlights a granular fabric to urban ...


Journal Peer Review In Context: A Qualitative Study Of The Social And Subjective Dimensions Of Manuscript Review In Biomedical Publishing, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Stacy M. Carter, Miles Little Jan 2011

Journal Peer Review In Context: A Qualitative Study Of The Social And Subjective Dimensions Of Manuscript Review In Biomedical Publishing, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Stacy M. Carter, Miles Little

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Peer- and editorial review of research submitted to biomedical journals ('manuscript review') is frequently argued to be essential for ensuring scientific quality and the dissemination of important ideas, but there is also broad agreement that manuscript review is often unsuccessful in achieving its goals. Problems with manuscript review are frequently attributed to the social and subjective dimensions of the process (e.g. bias and conflict of interest). While there have been numerous efforts to improve the process, these have had limited success. This may be because these efforts do not account sufficiently for all of the social and subjective dimensions ...