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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Smart Nanotextiles: A Review Of Materials And Applications, Gordon G. Wallace, Danilo De Rossi, Yanzhe Wu, King-Tong Lau, Shirley Coyle, Dermot Diamond Jan 2007

Smart Nanotextiles: A Review Of Materials And Applications, Gordon G. Wallace, Danilo De Rossi, Yanzhe Wu, King-Tong Lau, Shirley Coyle, Dermot Diamond

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

The development of smart nanotextiles has the potential to revolutionize the functionality of our clothing and the fabrics in our surroundings. Nanoscale manipulation results in new functionalities for intelligent textiles, including self-cleaning, sensing, actuating, and communicating. This is made possible by such developments as new materials, fibers, and finishings; inherently conducting polymers; carbon nanotubes; and antimicrobial nanocoatings. These additional functionalities have numerous applications, encompassing healthcare, sports, military applications, and fashion. The wearer and the surrounding environment may be monitored in an innocuous manner, giving continuous updates of individual health status or environmental hazards. More generally, smart textiles become a critical ...


A Review Of Consumer Involvement In Evaluations Of Case Management: Consistency With A Recovery Paradigm, Sarah L. Marshall, Trevor P. Crowe, Lindsay G. Oades, Frank F. Deane, David J. Kavanagh Jan 2007

A Review Of Consumer Involvement In Evaluations Of Case Management: Consistency With A Recovery Paradigm, Sarah L. Marshall, Trevor P. Crowe, Lindsay G. Oades, Frank F. Deane, David J. Kavanagh

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This Open Forum examines research on case management that draws on consumer perspectives. It clarifies the extent of consumer involvement and whether evaluations were informed by recovery perspectives. Searches of three databases revealed 13 studies that sought to investigate consumer perspectives. Only one study asked consumers about experiences of recovery. Most evaluations did not adequately assess consumers' views, and active consumer participation in research was rare. Supporting an individual's recovery requires commitment to a recovery paradigm that incorporates traditional symptom reduction and improved functioning, with broader recovery principles, and a shift in focus from illness to well-being. It also ...