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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Effect Of Cannabis Use In People With Chronic Non-Cancer Pain Prescribed Opioids: Findings From A 4-Year Prospective Cohort Study, Gabrielle Campbell, Wayne Hall, Amy Peacock, Nicholas Lintzeris, Raimondo Bruno, Briony K. Larance, Suzanne Nielsen, Milton Cohen, Gary Chan, Richard P. Mattick, Fiona Blyth, Marian D. Shanahan, Timothy Dobbins, Michael P. Farrell, Louisa Degenhardt Jan 2018

Effect Of Cannabis Use In People With Chronic Non-Cancer Pain Prescribed Opioids: Findings From A 4-Year Prospective Cohort Study, Gabrielle Campbell, Wayne Hall, Amy Peacock, Nicholas Lintzeris, Raimondo Bruno, Briony K. Larance, Suzanne Nielsen, Milton Cohen, Gary Chan, Richard P. Mattick, Fiona Blyth, Marian D. Shanahan, Timothy Dobbins, Michael P. Farrell, Louisa Degenhardt

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background Interest in the use of cannabis and cannabinoids to treat chronic non-cancer pain is increasing, because of their potential to reduce opioid dose requirements. We aimed to investigate cannabis use in people living with chronic non-cancer pain who had been prescribed opioids, including their reasons for use and perceived effectiveness of cannabis; associations between amount of cannabis use and pain, mental health, and opioid use; the effect of cannabis use on pain severity and interference over time; and potential opioid-sparing effects of cannabis. Methods The Pain and Opioids IN Treatment study is a prospective, national, observational cohort of people ...


Parental Perceptions Of Barriers To Mental Health Services For Young People, Wendy Iskra, Frank P. Deane, Tim Wahlin, Esther Davis Jan 2018

Parental Perceptions Of Barriers To Mental Health Services For Young People, Wendy Iskra, Frank P. Deane, Tim Wahlin, Esther Davis

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Aim: This study explores a range of barriers that parents encountered in accessing mental health services. The study also explored whether parents experienced similar barriers to accessing services in 2003 and 2013. Methods: One hundred and thirty-four parents of young people attending an initial assessment at a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) or headspace centre completed a questionnaire assessing 10 general barriers to care. These data were compared to those collected from 129 participants at CAMHS in 2003. Results: The ranking of barriers to mental health care for their children was similar for both survey years, with 'wait ...


How Do People Belong In The Pacific? Introduction To This Issue, Camellia B. Webb-Gannon, Jioji Ravulo Jan 2018

How Do People Belong In The Pacific? Introduction To This Issue, Camellia B. Webb-Gannon, Jioji Ravulo

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In early 2016, the two editors of this issue met together to discuss our common research interests. At that time, one of us (Jioji Ravulo) was a Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences and Psychology at Western Sydney University (WSU), and the other of us (Camellia Webb-Gannon) was a Research Fellow in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at the same institution. Camellia, whose research focuses on decolonisation in Melanesia, had recently returned from the 2016 Australian Association for Pacific Studies (AAPS) conference in Cairns at which she had hoped she would meet other researchers of the ...


People With Epilepsy Aren't Protected In Africa: What Needs To Be Done, Jacob Mugumbate Jan 2018

People With Epilepsy Aren't Protected In Africa: What Needs To Be Done, Jacob Mugumbate

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In October 2017 Abdul Matola was stoned and burnt to death in Malawi after being accused of being a "bloodsucking vampire". Matola had lived with uncontrolled epilepsy -- a highly treatable and non-infectious condition characterised by recurring seizures.


Island-Hopping Study Shows The Most Likely Route The First People Took To Australia, Kasih Norman Jan 2018

Island-Hopping Study Shows The Most Likely Route The First People Took To Australia, Kasih Norman

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The First Australians were among the world's earliest great ocean explorers, undertaking a remarkable 2,000km maritime migration through Indonesia which led to the discovery of Australia at least 65,000 years ago. But the voyaging routes taken through Indonesia's islands, and the location of first landfall in Australia, remain a much debated mystery to archaeologists. Our research, published earlier this year in Quaternary Science Reviews, highlights the most likely route by mapping islands in the region over time through changing sea levels.


Getting The Temperature Just Right Helps People With Dementia Stay Cool, Paul Cooper, Federico Tartarini, Richard Fleming Jan 2018

Getting The Temperature Just Right Helps People With Dementia Stay Cool, Paul Cooper, Federico Tartarini, Richard Fleming

Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences - Papers: Part B

Everyone knows how bad it feels when the temperature is uncomfortably hot or cold. For most of us it doesn't last long as we can take simple steps to get comfortable, such as putting on clothes, opening a window, or switching on a heater. But what happens when you can't control the temperature where you live? This problem is faced by many residents of aged care facilities, and can be particularly difficult for those living with dementia. To find out how these residents cope we recently carried out a three-year research project on the effects of indoor environment ...