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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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University of Wollongong

Community-based

Publication Year

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Community-Based Service-Learning: Partnerships Of Reciprocal Exchange?, Laura Ann Hammersley Jan 2013

Community-Based Service-Learning: Partnerships Of Reciprocal Exchange?, Laura Ann Hammersley

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Community-based service-learning (CBSL) integrates experiential learning and academic goals with organized activities designed to meet the objectives of community partners. CBSL has potential to enhance (1) academic learning, (2) foster civic responsibility, (3) develop life skills and (4) transform student attitudes. However, little research supports claims that benefits are mutual amongst host counterparts. A lack of empirical research into community partner conceptualizations of best practice approaches and impacts, reflects a uni-dimensional understanding of the mutuality of programs, and fails to challenge dominant power relations embedded in traditionally uneven partnerships. It remains problematic to engage with service-learning without considering neocolonialist ideologies ...


The Carletonville-Mothusimpilo Project: Limiting Transmission Of Hiv Through Community-Based Interventions, Brian G. Williams, Catherine L. Mac Phail, Catherine Campbell, D Taljaard, Eleanor Gouws, S Moema, Z Mzaidume, B Rasego Jan 2000

The Carletonville-Mothusimpilo Project: Limiting Transmission Of Hiv Through Community-Based Interventions, Brian G. Williams, Catherine L. Mac Phail, Catherine Campbell, D Taljaard, Eleanor Gouws, S Moema, Z Mzaidume, B Rasego

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

For all of the last century, the economy of South Africa, and so also of its neighbouring countries, has depended on migrant labour from rural areas. This is particularly so for the mining industry, especially hard-rock mining, and this has led to a system of 'oscillating' migration whereby men from rural areas come to live and work on the mines, without their wives or families, but return home regularly. This pattern of oscillating migration is an important determinant of health and, especially at the start of the epidemic, contributed to the spread of HIV in the region. In this paper ...