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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Intersectional Influences Of Prince: A Human-Animal Tribute, Annie K. Potts Jun 2016

The Intersectional Influences Of Prince: A Human-Animal Tribute, Annie K. Potts

Animal Studies Journal

Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016) was best known for his joyful funk music and electrifying stage performances that transgressed normative representations of gender, sexuality, race, spirituality, identity and taste. He was also a compassionate person who held deep convictions about freedom and the right of all species to enjoy lives without fear and suffering. This essay discusses Prince’s intersectional influences – the various ways his virtuosity over the past 38 years disrupted binaries, challenged assumptions and stereotypes, advocated for social justice, and combatted speciesism in its many forms. Embedded within the essay are seven personal tributes written by fans of Prince ...


Animal Studies Journal 2016 5 (1): Cover Page, Table Of Contents, Notes On Contributors And Editorial, Melissa J. Boyde Jun 2016

Animal Studies Journal 2016 5 (1): Cover Page, Table Of Contents, Notes On Contributors And Editorial, Melissa J. Boyde

Animal Studies Journal

Cover page, table of contents, contributor biographies and editorial for Animal Studies Journal Vol. 5 No.1, 2016.


Toothsome Termites And Grilled Grasshoppers: A Cultural History Of Invertebrate Gastronomy, Deirdre P. Coleman Jun 2016

Toothsome Termites And Grilled Grasshoppers: A Cultural History Of Invertebrate Gastronomy, Deirdre P. Coleman

Animal Studies Journal

This article examines the recent turn to entomophagy (insect eating) as a new source of nutrition in a world confronted by increasing population, degraded soils, and food insecurity. Although many regard entomophagy with disgust, there is a case to be made that many insects are much more nutritious, as well as greener and cleaner¹, than many of the foods we regularly eat without thinking. Also, there is nothing new about insect eating or the belief in entomophagy as a sustainable and sensible practice. There is a long cultural history in countries such as Africa and Australia, for instance.


Thirteen Figurings: Reflections On Termites, From Below, Perdita Phillips Jun 2016

Thirteen Figurings: Reflections On Termites, From Below, Perdita Phillips

Animal Studies Journal

This image essay is a creative reflection back upon The Encyclopaedia Isoptera: An encyclopaedia of the arts, sciences, literature and general information about termites, which was mostly written by the artist between 1997 and 1998, and forward to what termite art might undo today. Without access to living termites and, predating multispecies ethnographies, the Encyclopaedia Isoptera was an investigation into the limits of knowledge around termites. Looking back, it can be seen that certain strategies in the Encyclopaedia, such as looking at superseded or alternative knowledge, was a way of interrogating the boundaries of the sensible/insensible, and parallels more ...


Mimicry And Mimesis: Matrix Insect, Madeleine Kelly Jun 2016

Mimicry And Mimesis: Matrix Insect, Madeleine Kelly

Animal Studies Journal

Paintings and insects might seem like odd companions. In this paper I describe how a series of paintings I made depicting insects creates associations between mimesis and mimicry in order to flag a sort of protective self-referentiality – one where painting resists its proverbial ‘end’ and insects are presented as vital new orders. Drawing upon art historical references, such as Surrealism and the modernist grid, I argue that playing on these references and the compositional effects of camouflage enlivens our regard for the sensuous worlds of both insects and painting. I conclude by exploring how paintings of insects are powerful metaphors ...


Do Insects Feel Pain?, Helen Tiffin Jun 2016

Do Insects Feel Pain?, Helen Tiffin

Animal Studies Journal

This paper briefly considers the broad social and scientific background to research into the possibility of insects experiencing pain sensations analogous to our own. There has been increasing use of insects in pain experiments generally, as ethical constraints on the use of other animals increased through the last century. The ways in which scientists have tackled the question of insect pain, particularly in trying to distinguish between nociception and pain are then selectively summarised. These include opioid, hormonal, evolutionary, neurophysiological and behavioural approaches, as well as experiments designed to elucidate the difficult area of insect consciousness, from the 1980s to ...


Humans, Insects And Their Interaction: A Multi-Faceted Analysis, Raynald H. Lemelin, Rick W. Harper, Jason Dampier, Robert Bowles, Debbie Balika Jun 2016

Humans, Insects And Their Interaction: A Multi-Faceted Analysis, Raynald H. Lemelin, Rick W. Harper, Jason Dampier, Robert Bowles, Debbie Balika

Animal Studies Journal

By administering Personal Meaning of Insects Maps (PMIM) to participants from eastern Canada and northeastern United States, we examine how people’s perceptions of insects are often determined by childhood encounters, corporeal cues, and influenced by environmental preference during recreational activities, often resulting in inconsistencies, inaccuracies, and bias. While the purpose of this study was to acquire a greater understanding of these entanglements through visual maps, the goal of this paper is to disentangle these morasses by highlighting the various positive, negative, dialectic, and ambivalent aspects of how insects are perceived.


Through The Eyes Of A Bee: Seeing The World As A Whole, Adrian G. Dyer, Scarlett R. Howard, Jair E. Garcia Jun 2016

Through The Eyes Of A Bee: Seeing The World As A Whole, Adrian G. Dyer, Scarlett R. Howard, Jair E. Garcia

Animal Studies Journal

Honeybees are an important model species for understanding animal vision as free-flying individuals can be easily trained by researchers to collect nutrition from novel visual stimuli and thus learn visual tasks. A leading question in animal vision is whether it is possible to perceive all information within a scene, or if only elemental cues are perceived driven by the visual system and supporting neural mechanisms. In human vision we often process the global content of a scene, and prefer such information to local elemental features. Here we discuss recent evidence from studies on honeybees which demonstrate a preference for global ...


A Sustainable Campus: The Sydney Declaration On Interspecies Sustainability, Fiona Probyn-Rapsey, Sue Donaldson, George Ioannides, Tess Lea, Kate Marsh, Astrida Neimanis, Annie Potts, Nik Taylor, Richard Twine, Dinesh Wadiwel, Stuart White Jun 2016

A Sustainable Campus: The Sydney Declaration On Interspecies Sustainability, Fiona Probyn-Rapsey, Sue Donaldson, George Ioannides, Tess Lea, Kate Marsh, Astrida Neimanis, Annie Potts, Nik Taylor, Richard Twine, Dinesh Wadiwel, Stuart White

Animal Studies Journal

Under the remit of an expanded definition of sustainability – one that acknowledges animal agriculture as a key carbon intensive industry, and one that includes interspecies ethics as an integral part of social justice – institutions such as Universities can and should play a role in supporting a wider agenda for sustainable food practices on campus. By drawing out clear connections between sustainability objectives on campus and the shift away from animal based products, the objective of this article is to advocate for a more consistent understanding and implementation of sustainability measures as championed by university campuses at large. We will draw ...


[Review] Robert Cribb, Helen Gilbert And Helen Tiffen, Wild Man From Borneo: A Cultural History Of The Orangutan. Honolulu: University Of Hawai’I Press, 2014, Matthew Chrulew Jun 2016

[Review] Robert Cribb, Helen Gilbert And Helen Tiffen, Wild Man From Borneo: A Cultural History Of The Orangutan. Honolulu: University Of Hawai’I Press, 2014, Matthew Chrulew

Animal Studies Journal

Wild Man from Borneo is a studious and wide-ranging cultural history of the orangutan and an indispensable resource for anyone working on this species or great apes in general. Orangutan stories and encounters have always captivated, from the tales of the Dayak and Batak peoples from Borneo and Indonesia, to the first rumours of early European travellers, and later observations and dissections. The orangutan’s uncanny similarity to humans, both in form and behaviour, made it central to a nineteenth-century debate about the uniqueness of humanity, in a time when few had been seen and Europeans were unsure just what ...


[Review] Ann C. Colley, Wild Animal Skins In Victorian Britain. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014, John Simons Jun 2016

[Review] Ann C. Colley, Wild Animal Skins In Victorian Britain. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014, John Simons

Animal Studies Journal

You should never judge a book by its cover but, of course, that’s exactly what the Victorians did when they looked at animals—or so Professor Ann Colley claims, and with some justification. This book is a contribution to the growing list of valuable and entertaining studies of the collection and exhibition of wild animals in Victorian Britain and beyond, and it is highly recommended to anyone researching the field. I was looking forward to reading this as although there has been a fair bit of work on zoos and menageries and, especially recently, on taxidermy, the habit of ...


[Review] David Wilson, The Welfare Of Performing Animals: A Historical Perspective. Berlin: Springer, 2015, Peta Tait Jun 2016

[Review] David Wilson, The Welfare Of Performing Animals: A Historical Perspective. Berlin: Springer, 2015, Peta Tait

Animal Studies Journal

This book makes a valuable contribution to animal studies. It investigates the social and political processes concerned with the welfare of performing animals in Britain from the nineteenth century into the twentieth century. Although this area requires specialised inquiry, as David Wilson points out, animal performance is usually generalised about within pro-animal scholarship. Drawing on highly detailed research, this book provides a comprehensive account of the individuals and organisations that campaigned against animal performance and its cruelties and, in turn, those who campaigned for its continuation. It presents the human stories behind the movement against animal performance; descriptions of the ...


Provocations From The Field : The Place Of Bees, Michael R. Griffiths Jun 2016

Provocations From The Field : The Place Of Bees, Michael R. Griffiths

Animal Studies Journal

What would it mean to permit lack to become a productive place? What, indeed, would it mean to think place – so often feminized in the carnophallogocentric order – as active? Lack, in these terms, could be constitutive rather than a mere marker of absence. I propose that the place of bees in the symbolics of species could yield answers to these and related questions. Insects are often understood and conceived as communicators – through pheromones for instance. But in the very gesture that recognizes their communication, one finds the refusal of consciousness behind this communicative apparatus. If bees are said to lack ...


Compositional Data Analysis As A Robust Tool To Delineate Hydrochemical Facies Within And Between Gas-Bearing Aquifers, D D.R Owen, V Pawlowsky-Glahn, J J. Egozcue, A Buccianti, John M. Bradd Jan 2016

Compositional Data Analysis As A Robust Tool To Delineate Hydrochemical Facies Within And Between Gas-Bearing Aquifers, D D.R Owen, V Pawlowsky-Glahn, J J. Egozcue, A Buccianti, John M. Bradd

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Isometric log ratios of proportions of major ions, derived from intuitive sequential binary partitions, are used to characterize hydrochemical variability within and between coal seam gas (CSG) and surrounding aquifers in a number of sedimentary basins in the USA and Australia. These isometric log ratios are the coordinates corresponding to an orthonormal basis in the sample space (the simplex). The characteristic proportions of ions, as described by linear models of isometric log ratios, can be used for a mathematical-descriptive classification of water types. This is a more informative and robust method of describing water types than simply classifying a water ...


Three Arcs: Observations On The Archaeology Of The Elands Bay And Northern Cederberg Landscapes, Alex Mackay Jan 2016

Three Arcs: Observations On The Archaeology Of The Elands Bay And Northern Cederberg Landscapes, Alex Mackay

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The area around Elands Bay and the adjacent interior landscapes west of the Doring River have been subject to intense archaeological investigation over the last ~50 years. The result is a region with great depth and diversity of archaeological information. In this paper I discuss three general observations that arise from the integration of data across this region. The first is that redundancy in site occupation is limited: even where many sites are excavated in a small area, understanding of the regional sequence cannot be assumed to be complete. The second is that humans did not live in rock shelters ...


A Teaching Model For Health Professionals Learning Reflective Practice, Joanne T. Joyce-Mccoach, Kylie Smith Jan 2016

A Teaching Model For Health Professionals Learning Reflective Practice, Joanne T. Joyce-Mccoach, Kylie Smith

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The aim of this work was to use the theory and concepts of critical reflection in the development of a teaching model to enhance the learning approach to reflective practice for health professionals. The results of this initial stage of a larger project have identified the key challenges for health professionals learning about reflective practice. From the literature a model for teaching critical reflection was conceptualized. It begins with an exploration of self and values, moves students through a dialogue with peers, and explores the social and historical contexts of practice. Conclusions drawn from this work show that despite the ...


Climatic Controls On The Global Distribution, Abundance, And Species Richness Of Mangrove Forests, Michael Osland, Laura Feher, Kereen Griffith, Kyle Cavanaugh, Nicholas Enwright, Richard Day, Camille Stagg, Ken W. Krauss, Rebecca Howard, James Grace, Kerrylee Rogers Jan 2016

Climatic Controls On The Global Distribution, Abundance, And Species Richness Of Mangrove Forests, Michael Osland, Laura Feher, Kereen Griffith, Kyle Cavanaugh, Nicholas Enwright, Richard Day, Camille Stagg, Ken W. Krauss, Rebecca Howard, James Grace, Kerrylee Rogers

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Mangrove forests are highly productive tidal saline wetland ecosystems found along sheltered tropical and subtropical coasts. Ecologists have long assumed that climatic drivers (i.e., temperature and rainfall regimes) govern the global distribution, structure, and function of mangrove forests. However, data constraints have hindered the quantification of direct climate-mangrove linkages in many parts of the world. Recently, the quality and availability of global-scale climate and mangrove data have been improving. Here, we used these data to better understand the influence of air temperature and rainfall regimes upon the distribution, abundance, and species richness of mangrove forests. Although our analyses identify ...


Raising Awareness Of Research Evidence Among Health Professionals Delivering Dementia Care: Are Knowledge Translation Workshops Useful?, Belinda J. Goodenough, Richard Fleming, Michael Young, Kim Burns, Cindy Jones, Fallon M. Forbes Jan 2016

Raising Awareness Of Research Evidence Among Health Professionals Delivering Dementia Care: Are Knowledge Translation Workshops Useful?, Belinda J. Goodenough, Richard Fleming, Michael Young, Kim Burns, Cindy Jones, Fallon M. Forbes

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Providing information about the latest research via educational sessions to health professionals caring for people with dementia may be insufficient to drive change. This project explored self-reported impacts on practice change of adding information about knowledge translation (KT) to a national dementia education program. Six national workshop days were held. Each provided the option of participating in a Principles of KT and innovation implementation seminar in addition to a clinical topic update (sexualities and dementia, or managing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia). Six months postworkshop, 321 participants were invited to complete a research utilization survey. Seventy-five responded. KT seminar ...


Isolation And Structural Analysis Of The Covalent Adduct Formed Between A Bis-Amino Mitoxantrone Analogue And Dna: A Pathway To Major-Minor Groove Cross-Linked Adducts, Shyam K. Konda, Celine Kelso, Jelena Medan, Brad E. Sleebs, Don R. Phillips, Suzanne M. Cutts, J Grant Collins Jan 2016

Isolation And Structural Analysis Of The Covalent Adduct Formed Between A Bis-Amino Mitoxantrone Analogue And Dna: A Pathway To Major-Minor Groove Cross-Linked Adducts, Shyam K. Konda, Celine Kelso, Jelena Medan, Brad E. Sleebs, Don R. Phillips, Suzanne M. Cutts, J Grant Collins

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The major covalent adduct formed between a 13C-labelled formaldehyde activated bis-amino mitoxantrone analogue (WEHI-150) and the hexanucleotide d(CG5MeCGCG)2 has been isolated by HPLC chromatography and the structure determined by NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that WEHI-150 forms one covalent bond through a primary amine to the N-2 of the G2 residue, with the polycyclic ring structure intercalated at the 5MeC3pG4/G10p5MeC9 site. Furthermore, the WEHI-150 aromatic ring system is oriented approximately parallel to the long axis of the base pairs, with one aliphatic side-chain in ...


Medication Management For People Living With Dementia: Development And Evaluation Of A Multilingual Information Resource For Family Caregivers Of People Living With Dementia, Robyn Gillespie, Pippa Burns, Lindsey Harrison, Amanda Ann Baker, Khin Than Win, Victoria Traynor, Judy Mullan Jan 2016

Medication Management For People Living With Dementia: Development And Evaluation Of A Multilingual Information Resource For Family Caregivers Of People Living With Dementia, Robyn Gillespie, Pippa Burns, Lindsey Harrison, Amanda Ann Baker, Khin Than Win, Victoria Traynor, Judy Mullan

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The aim of this chapter is to describe the development and evaluation of an online multilingual information resource focused on medication management, targeting people living with dementia and their family caregivers. Maintaining effective medication management is important to allow ongoing quality of life within the community setting and avoiding medication-related preventable hospitalisations for the person living with dementia. Family caregivers are likely to assume the role of medication management on behalf of the person in their care as dementia progresses. Little training or information is available to family caregivers to assist them with this role. A pilot online information resource ...


The Expanding Role Of Urban Fluvial Geomorphology: South Creek, Stephanie J. Kermode, Phillip Birtles, Geoff Vietz, Stephen Lynch, Jonathon Dixon, Carl Tippler, Michael Dean Jan 2016

The Expanding Role Of Urban Fluvial Geomorphology: South Creek, Stephanie J. Kermode, Phillip Birtles, Geoff Vietz, Stephen Lynch, Jonathon Dixon, Carl Tippler, Michael Dean

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

As aspirations for waterways in urban areas increases, and we demand more social and environmental values from them, an increased role exists for applied geomorphology in urban streams of the future. Previously, there has been a strong focus on flood mitigation and water quality in stream management, and even where geomorphology has been used to drive legislation (e.g. stream order, offsets), desired outcomes have not always been achieved. Understanding how physical attributes of channels are altered by urbanisation, and how the physical template and waterways can assist in achieving aspirational goals, is now central to urban landscape managers and ...


Do Introduced Honeybees Affect Seed Set And Seed Quality In A Plant Adapted For Bird Pollination?, Amy-Marie Gilpin, Justin C. Collette, Andrew J. Denham, Mark K. J Ooi, David J. Ayre Jan 2016

Do Introduced Honeybees Affect Seed Set And Seed Quality In A Plant Adapted For Bird Pollination?, Amy-Marie Gilpin, Justin C. Collette, Andrew J. Denham, Mark K. J Ooi, David J. Ayre

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Aims: Worldwide, evidence suggests that exotic pollinators can disrupt plant mating patterns. However, few studies have determined if pollination by the honeybee Apis mellifera (the world's most widely introduced pollinator) reduces offspring quality when compared with pollination by native birds. The Australian Proteaceae provide an excellent opportunity to test the impact of honeybees in pollination systems that are adapted to birds and non-flying mammals.

Methods: We compared the frequency of flower visitation and foraging behaviour of birds and insects within seven populations of Banksia ericifolia. Banksia ericifolia is hermaphroditic and has large nectar-rich, orange inflorescences typical of bird and ...


Rural Health Professionals' Experiences In Implementing Advance Care Planning: A Focus Group Study, Sophie Fletcher, Craig Sinclair, Joel J. Rhee, Desiree Goh, Kirsten Auret Jan 2016

Rural Health Professionals' Experiences In Implementing Advance Care Planning: A Focus Group Study, Sophie Fletcher, Craig Sinclair, Joel J. Rhee, Desiree Goh, Kirsten Auret

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Advance care planning (ACP) is described as an ongoing discussion between a patient, their family and healthcare professionals (HCPs) to understand a patient's wishes for future health care. Legislation supporting ACP in Western Australia is relatively new and HCPs are still learning about the process and implementation. This study aimed to provide a rich description of rural health professionals' perceptions and experiences with ACP within the context of their professional role and to identify systemic issues and training needs. Ten focus groups were conducted throughout 2014 with a total of 55 rural participants including general practitioners (n≤15), general ...


The Thermal Dependence Of Na+ Flux In Isolated Liver Cells From Ectotherms And Endotherms, Paul Else Jan 2016

The Thermal Dependence Of Na+ Flux In Isolated Liver Cells From Ectotherms And Endotherms, Paul Else

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The thermal dependence (0-40°C) of Na+ flux in isolated liver cells of three endotherms (mice, rat and rabbit) was compared with that of ectotherms in the form of a thermally tolerant amphibian (cane toad), a cold-water fish (rainbow trout) and a thermophilic reptile (lizard). Mammals were found to share similar high rates of Na+ flux (3.0-3.7 nmol Na+ mg−1 protein min−1) at their normal body temperatures (36-39°C). These Na+ flux rates were significantly greater (P<0.0004-0.0001) than those of the ectotherms, which shared similar low rates of Na+ flux (0.7-1.3 nmol Na+ mg−1 protein min−1) at their very different normal acclimated body temperatures (15°C for trout, 25°C for toad and 37°C for the lizard species). Trout, which possess highly unsaturated membranes (similar to those of mammals), showed a Na+ flux with high thermal sensitivity at low temperatures similar to that found in mammals at higher temperatures. The thermal sensitivity of toad Na+ flux was significantly less (P<0.05-0.01) than that of rat and rabbit. Trout Na+ flux did not increase with increasing temperature much above 20°C, whereas all other species measured increased their Na+ flux with increasing temperature up to 40°C. In conclusion, at normal operating body temperatures, the rate of Na+ flux is much lower in ectotherms.


Neuroprotective Effects Of Apigenin Against Inflammation, Neuronal Excitability And Apoptosis In An Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model Of Alzheimer's Disease, Rachelle Balez, Nicole Steiner, Martin Engel, Sonia Sanz Munoz, Jeremy S. Lum, Yizhen Wu, Dadong Wang, Pascal Vallotton, Perminder Sachdev, Michael D. O'Connor, Kuldip Sidhu, Gerald Münch, Lezanne Ooi Jan 2016

Neuroprotective Effects Of Apigenin Against Inflammation, Neuronal Excitability And Apoptosis In An Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model Of Alzheimer's Disease, Rachelle Balez, Nicole Steiner, Martin Engel, Sonia Sanz Munoz, Jeremy S. Lum, Yizhen Wu, Dadong Wang, Pascal Vallotton, Perminder Sachdev, Michael D. O'Connor, Kuldip Sidhu, Gerald Münch, Lezanne Ooi

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases, yet current therapeutic treatments are inadequate due to a complex disease pathogenesis. The plant polyphenol apigenin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties in a number of cell and animal models; however a comprehensive assessment has not been performed in a human model of AD. Here we have used a human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of familial and sporadic AD, in addition to healthy controls, to assess the neuroprotective activity of apigenin. The iPSC-derived AD neurons demonstrated a hyper-excitable calcium signalling phenotype, elevated levels ...


Nutritional Interventions For Survivors Of Childhood Cancer, Jennifer Cohen, Claire E. Wakefield, Richard J. Cohn Jan 2016

Nutritional Interventions For Survivors Of Childhood Cancer, Jennifer Cohen, Claire E. Wakefield, Richard J. Cohn

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Background Childhood cancer survivors are at a higher risk of developing health conditions such as osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease than their peers. Health-promoting behaviour, such as consuming a healthy diet, could lessen the impact of these chronic issues, yet the prevalence rate of health-protecting behaviour amongst survivors of childhood cancer is similar to that of the general population. Targeted nutritional interventions may prevent or reduce the incidence of these chronic diseases. Objectives The primary aim of this review was to assess the efficacy of a range of nutritional interventions designed to improve the nutritional intake of childhood cancer survivors, as ...


The Industrial Revolution Kick-Started Global Warming Much Earlier Than We Realised, Helen V. Mcgregor, Joelle Gergis, Nerilie J. Abram, Steven J. Phipps Jan 2016

The Industrial Revolution Kick-Started Global Warming Much Earlier Than We Realised, Helen V. Mcgregor, Joelle Gergis, Nerilie J. Abram, Steven J. Phipps

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

In the early days of the Industrial Revolution, no one would have thought that their burning of fossil fuels would have an almost immediate effect on the climate. But our new study, published today in Nature, reveals that warming in some regions actually began as early as the 1830s. That is much earlier than previously thought, so our discovery redefines our understanding of when human activity began to influence our climate.


Flowers In Australia: Phytochemical Studies On The Illawarra Flame Tree And Alstonville, Rudi Hendra, Paul A. Keller Jan 2016

Flowers In Australia: Phytochemical Studies On The Illawarra Flame Tree And Alstonville, Rudi Hendra, Paul A. Keller

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The first reported phytochemical studies on two species of flowers in Australia enabled the identification of six secondary metabolites from Illawarra flame tree flower (Brachychiton acerifolius) and seven secondary metabolites from the flowers of the Alstonville (Tibouchina lepidota). Pelargonidin 3-(6-coumarylglucoside)-5-(6-acetylglucoside) was found to be responsible for the red colour of B. acerifolius, whereas malvidin 3-(coumarylglucoside)-5-(acetylxyloside) was responsible for the purple colour of (T. lepidota) flowers. (2S)-4,5-Dihydroxyflavanone 7-O-β-d-glucuronide methyl ester was isolated for the first time from B. acerifolius, and its absolute configuration was determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Some of the traditional ...


Disinhibition-Like Behavior In A P301s Mutant Tau Transgenic Mouse Model Of Frontotemporal Dementia, Magdalena Przybyla, Claire H. Stevens, Julia Van Der Hoven, Anne Harasta, Mian Bi, Arne Ittner, Annika Van Hummel, John R. Hodges, Olivier Piguet, Tim Karl, Michael Kassiou, Gary D. Housley, Yazi D. Ke, Lars M. Ittner, Janet Van Eersel Jan 2016

Disinhibition-Like Behavior In A P301s Mutant Tau Transgenic Mouse Model Of Frontotemporal Dementia, Magdalena Przybyla, Claire H. Stevens, Julia Van Der Hoven, Anne Harasta, Mian Bi, Arne Ittner, Annika Van Hummel, John R. Hodges, Olivier Piguet, Tim Karl, Michael Kassiou, Gary D. Housley, Yazi D. Ke, Lars M. Ittner, Janet Van Eersel

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) presents clinically with behavioral changes including disinhibition. Mutations in the tau-encoding MAPT gene identified in familial cases of FTD have been used to generate transgenic mouse models of the human condition. Here, we report behavioral changes in a recently developed P301S mutant tau transgenic mouse, including disinhibition-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and hyperactivity in the open field arena. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed the amygdala as a primary and early site of pathological tau deposition in these mice. Taken together, neuropathological and behavioral changes in P301S tau transgenic mice resemble features of human FTD.


Linking Pattern To Process In Reef Sediment Dynamics At Lady Musgrave Island, Southern Great Barrier Reef, Sarah Hamylton, Rafael Cabral Carvalho, Stephanie Duce, Chris M. Roelfsema, Ana Vila-Concejo Jan 2016

Linking Pattern To Process In Reef Sediment Dynamics At Lady Musgrave Island, Southern Great Barrier Reef, Sarah Hamylton, Rafael Cabral Carvalho, Stephanie Duce, Chris M. Roelfsema, Ana Vila-Concejo

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Linking surficial sediment patterns in reef environments to the processes that underlie their depositional dynamics enables predictions to be made of how environmental changes will influence reef-associated sedimentary landforms, such as islands and beaches. Geomorphic linkages between sediment deposition patterns and the biophysical processes that drive them are often poorly resolved, particularly at broad landscape scales where tangible statements can be made about structural changes to landforms. The present study applies geospatial techniques to link patterns in reef sediment dynamics at Lady Musgrave Island to the underlying processes driving them. In situ calcification is characterized by developing a high resolution ...