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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Treating Malnutrition In Hospitals: Dietitians In The Driving Seat?, K. L. Walton Dec 2009

Treating Malnutrition In Hospitals: Dietitians In The Driving Seat?, K. L. Walton

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Although the problem of malnutrition in hospitals is not new,1,2 it is still a serious concern in Australian hospitals today. The population is ageing and patients are admitted with multiple medical problems placing them at increased risk of malnutrition. Malnutrition prevalence rates in Australian hospitals have ranged from 6-53%.3-13 The wide variation is due to different study settings; the time between admission and assessment, and the assessment tool used. Malnutrition is a considerable problem that increases with age. Patients over 80 years have a higher odds risk of being malnourished compared with those between 61-80 years.9 ...


Prison Foodservice In Australia - Systems, Menus And Inmate Attitudes, P. Williams, Karen L. Walton, M. Hannan-Jones Aug 2009

Prison Foodservice In Australia - Systems, Menus And Inmate Attitudes, P. Williams, Karen L. Walton, M. Hannan-Jones

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper presents results from three studies in 25 custodial facilities in three Australian states, including nutrient analyses of menus and focus groups exploring inmate attitudes. Both cook-fresh and cook-chill production systems are used. Non-selective cycle menus of 4-6 weeks are common but inmates can supplement meals by purchase of additional food items (‘buy-ups’). Menus included adequate variety and met most nutritional standards, with the possible exception of fruit. The sodium content of menus is above recommended levels. Protein, fibre, vitamins A, C, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, iron and zinc were more than adequate, and the percentage energy from fat is ...


Regulatory Issues And Functional Health Claims For Bioactive Dairy Compounds, P. Roupas, P. G. Williams, C. Margetts Jul 2009

Regulatory Issues And Functional Health Claims For Bioactive Dairy Compounds, P. Roupas, P. G. Williams, C. Margetts

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Dairy foods and ingredients have a natural advantage over new/novel foods, from a regulatory viewpoint, because they are generally considered as “traditional” foods, that is, there is a long history of human consumption. However, the regulatory landscape on adding bioactive ingredients, whether from dairy streams or from non-dairy sources, into dairy foods is rapidly evolving, and the dairy industry will need to be aware of potential regulatory challenges, within the countries they wish to market their products.


Foodservice Perspective In Institutions, P. G. Williams Jun 2009

Foodservice Perspective In Institutions, P. G. Williams

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In Western countries around 10-15% of all foodservice meals are provided in institutional settings such as hospitals, nursing homes, prisons, schools, military settings and workplace canteens. This chapter describes the different types of meals and foodservice systems used in these institutional settings, including the menus used, nutritional standards, food waste, meals times, methods of counting meals and possible future trends.


Current Dietetic Practices Of Obesity Management In Saudi Arabia And Comparison With Australian Practices And Best Practice Criteria, A. Almajwal, P. Williams, Marijka Batterham Jun 2009

Current Dietetic Practices Of Obesity Management In Saudi Arabia And Comparison With Australian Practices And Best Practice Criteria, A. Almajwal, P. Williams, Marijka Batterham

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: To describe the dietetic practices of the treatment of obesity in Saudi Arabia and compare this with best practice criteria and the practice in Australia. Methods: Anonymous questionnaires were completed by dietitians in Saudi Arabia. The topics included barriers to obesity management, demand and level of service and strategies and approaches used for weight management. Best practice scores were based on those used to assess Australian dietitians. Results: 253 dietitians participated in the survey. Of these, 175 (69 %) were involved in the management of obesity. The best practice score for Australian dietitians was slightly but significantly greater than the ...


Trends In The Affordability Of The Illawarra Healthy Food Basket 2000-2007, P. G. Williams, A. Hull, M. Kontos Feb 2009

Trends In The Affordability Of The Illawarra Healthy Food Basket 2000-2007, P. G. Williams, A. Hull, M. Kontos

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Aims
The Illawarra Healthy Food Basket (IHFB) was developed as one measure to monitor the affordability of healthy eating in Australia. It consists of 57 items selected to meet the nutritional requirements of a reference family of five. The basket was first costed in the Illawarra region of Australia in 2000 and again in 2001 and 2003. This study aimed to repeat the costing of the basket in 2005 and 2007 and to assess the trends in affordability since 2000.
Methods
Costing was carried out in the same five suburbs as previous surveys, utilising a large supermarket, greengrocer and butcher ...


Video Recorded Participant Behaviours: The Association Between Food Choices And Observed Behaviours From A Web-Based Diet History Interview, Yasmine C. Probst, K. Deagnoli, M. Batterham, Linda C. Tapsell Jan 2009

Video Recorded Participant Behaviours: The Association Between Food Choices And Observed Behaviours From A Web-Based Diet History Interview, Yasmine C. Probst, K. Deagnoli, M. Batterham, Linda C. Tapsell

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Automation of dietary assessments allow participant behaviour to be captured by video observation. They also allow clinicians to identify areas which effect reporting accuracy. This observational study describes the differences in behaviour according to the type of foods selected by participants using a dietary assessment website encompassing diet history methodology.


Identification Of Food Groups For Use In A Self-Administered, Computer-Assisted Diet History Interview For Use In Australia, S. Burden, Y. C. Probst, D. G. Steel, Linda C. Tapsell Jan 2009

Identification Of Food Groups For Use In A Self-Administered, Computer-Assisted Diet History Interview For Use In Australia, S. Burden, Y. C. Probst, D. G. Steel, Linda C. Tapsell

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

To develop a set of food groups for use in a self-administered, computer-assisted diet history interview for use in Australia by combining foods into groups so as to minimize database error in the macronutrient values for the groups. The program needs to appropriately balance the level of detail used with the load on respondents and errors associated with categorization of foods into groups.


Hermeneutics In Primary Care: Corneal Ulceration Treated With Bandage Contact Lenses / Alternate Title: Case Report - Corneal Ulceration Treated With Bandage Contact Lenses, Tommy Cleary, Katherine Chan Jan 2009

Hermeneutics In Primary Care: Corneal Ulceration Treated With Bandage Contact Lenses / Alternate Title: Case Report - Corneal Ulceration Treated With Bandage Contact Lenses, Tommy Cleary, Katherine Chan

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Bandage contact lens use in primary care optometry can be important for allowing people to live without painful effects of corneal disease. This particular case study describes the initial healing of ulceration with a bandage contact lens inserted and also the long term issues of recurrence of ulceration with cessation of lens wear and management of microbial keratoconjunctivitis with bandage lens wear. In an attempt to address holistic themes this paper utilises a hermeneutical approach to clinical judgement in a primary care setting.


‘Natural’ Claims On Foods: A Review Of Regulations And A Pilot Study Of The Views Of Australian Consumers, P. G. Williams, J. Markoska, V. Chachay, Anne Mcmahon Jan 2009

‘Natural’ Claims On Foods: A Review Of Regulations And A Pilot Study Of The Views Of Australian Consumers, P. G. Williams, J. Markoska, V. Chachay, Anne Mcmahon

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The term ‘natural’ is often used on food labels, but is unregulated in Australia, except for prohibitions on misleading and deceptive conduct in the Trade Practices Act. This pilot study aimed to review definitions and regulations of ‘natural’ in Australia and internationally; record the ingredients used in a sample of foods marketed as natural; and examine consumer expectations about which ingredients could suitably be labeled natural. A survey of food labels at 12 food outlets recorded ingredients commonly used in foods marketed as natural. Consumer expectations were examined with a questionnaire about 25 ‘natural’ food ingredients. One hundred and nineteen ...


A Botanical Approach To Managing Obesity, Dilip Ghosh Jan 2009

A Botanical Approach To Managing Obesity, Dilip Ghosh

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

metabolic syndrome in check like obesity. There are few drugs in the market to ameliorate or prevent obesity but there are the costs, efficacy and side effects to consider. For centuries people across the countries have been using natural products and plant based dietary supplements for weight control. The current review will consists of one South Asian herb, Garcinia cambogia and one Chinese herb, Magnolia officinalis.


The Impact Of More Visible Standard Drink Labelling On Youth Alcohol Consumption: Helping Young People Drink (Ir)Responsibly?, Sandra C. Jones, Parri Gregory Jan 2009

The Impact Of More Visible Standard Drink Labelling On Youth Alcohol Consumption: Helping Young People Drink (Ir)Responsibly?, Sandra C. Jones, Parri Gregory

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Introduction and Aims. In response to increasing concerns about excessive drinking among young people the Australian alcohol industry announced that it will introduce more visible standard drink labels. This study sought to examine whether young people use this information in a way that decreases, or increases, alcohol-related harms. Design and Methods. Six focus groups with students enrolled in an undergraduate university course in a large regional city in New South Wales, recruited by direct approach on the university grounds and via an online message posted on the university bulletin board. Results: The majority of the participants reported that they are ...


What A National Psychology Board Will Mean For Current Registrants, And What It Might Contribute To Australian Psychology, B. F. S. Grenyer Jan 2009

What A National Psychology Board Will Mean For Current Registrants, And What It Might Contribute To Australian Psychology, B. F. S. Grenyer

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The National Psychology Board will put in place a single national standard for psychology registration that will be consistent with the other aspect of the scheme - a national system for psychology accreditation. No longer will differences in standards between States and Territories be exploited, and much administrative complexity will be removed with a single national registration. Currently, there is at least one psychologist who is registered in every State and Territory of Australia - and who applies to all eight jurisdictions and pays fees of over $1500 a year.


Updating The Dietadvice Website With New Australian Food Composition Data, Yasmine Probst, Holley-Anne Jones, Shannon Lin, S. Burden, David G. Steel, Linda C. Tapsell Jan 2009

Updating The Dietadvice Website With New Australian Food Composition Data, Yasmine Probst, Holley-Anne Jones, Shannon Lin, S. Burden, David G. Steel, Linda C. Tapsell

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

DietAdvice is an Australian self-administered dietary assessment website initially developed in 2003- 2005. The website allows patients to enter their dietary information and dieticians to remotely access and interpret the data. DietAdvice is presently being updated with new Australian food composition data. This study aims to describe the update process for moving from 1995 to 2006 food composition data. The database for the website was developed using grouped food data from the NUTTAB 1995 database. All food groups were cross-matched with the food from the NUTTAB 2006 database using the food ID codes. Rules were applied to determine the suitability ...


Are Toe Weakness And Deformity Associated With Falls In Older People, Karen J. Mickle, Bridget J. Munro, Stephen Lord, Hylton B. Menz, Julie R. Steele Jan 2009

Are Toe Weakness And Deformity Associated With Falls In Older People, Karen J. Mickle, Bridget J. Munro, Stephen Lord, Hylton B. Menz, Julie R. Steele

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Hallux valgus and lesser toe deformities are highly prevalent foot problems in older adults, affecting up to 74% of this population. One suggested cause of these toe deformities is inadequate strength of the intrinsic flexor muscles of the toes [1]. Adequate toe flexor strength is essential to control body weight shifts, propel the body during gait and assist in shock absorption during repeated impacts. Furthermore, a previous study using a qualitative measure of toe flexor strength reported associations between poor toe flexor strength and poor performance in balance and functional tests in elderly people [2]. Of further concern, in a ...


Shoes On Trial: Does A Safe Shoe Exist For Older People?, Bridget J. Munro, Karen J. Mickle, Jasmine C. Menant, Julie R. Steele Jan 2009

Shoes On Trial: Does A Safe Shoe Exist For Older People?, Bridget J. Munro, Karen J. Mickle, Jasmine C. Menant, Julie R. Steele

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

More than 80% of older people report foot problems and, as a result, tend to wear unstructured footwear that moulds to the shape of their deformed feet. While these unstructured shoes are deemed comfortable, it has been speculated that they contribute to home falls and hip fractures in the older population [1]. However, as walking barefoot or in socks has also been associated with an increased risk of falls in older people [2], we need to design safe but comfortable shoes for older people to wear in and around the home.


Can Undergarments Be Of Benefit When Working In Protective Clothing In Hot Environments?, Anne M.J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Jeroen Van Der Velde, Mark J. Patterson, Nigel A.S. Taylor Jan 2009

Can Undergarments Be Of Benefit When Working In Protective Clothing In Hot Environments?, Anne M.J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Jeroen Van Der Velde, Mark J. Patterson, Nigel A.S. Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The central focus of this project is the removal of sweat from the skin, and the enhancement of evaporative cooling and thermal comfort for individuals working in hot-dry conditions when wearing military clothing and body armour. This sweat removal can occur either through evaporation, or wicking from the skin surface and through the clothing layers (Lotens and Wammes, 1993; Yasuda et al., 1994), with evaporation eventually occurring from surfaces further away from the skin. Both processes remove body heat, but the former is more efficient.


Physiological Impact Of First-Responder Chemical, Biological And Radiological Protective Ensembles., Anne Van Den Heuvel, Joanne Caldwell, Mark Patterson, Nigel A.S. Taylor Jan 2009

Physiological Impact Of First-Responder Chemical, Biological And Radiological Protective Ensembles., Anne Van Den Heuvel, Joanne Caldwell, Mark Patterson, Nigel A.S. Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Clothing has two primary affects upon workers. First, it modifies the ease with which thermal energy (heat) is transferred between the body and the environment by providing the body with a layer of insulation. This can be advantageous in a thermally dangerous environment (e.g. fire fighting, cold-water immersion), but disadvantageous during strenuous exercise where a significant amount of metabolic heat is produced (Gonzales, 1988). Second, it affects moisture evaporation from the skin surface, and this has a critical impact upon both thermal comfort and body temperature regulation (Candas, 2002). When clothing is worn, evaporation at the skin surface will ...


An Evaluation Of The Thermal Protective Clothing Used By Six Australian Fire Brigades, Pete Kerry, Anne Van Den Heuvel, Martin Van Dijk, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A.S. Taylor Jan 2009

An Evaluation Of The Thermal Protective Clothing Used By Six Australian Fire Brigades, Pete Kerry, Anne Van Den Heuvel, Martin Van Dijk, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A.S. Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Individuals working in hot environments experience an increase in body core temperature due to the combined influences of physical activity, which elevates metabolic heat production, and external heat sources, which impede heat loss. Since dry heat exchanges are dependent upon thermal gradients, then hotter environments restrict heat dissipation, particularly when the air temperature approaches and exceeds that of the skin. Heat loss will now become progressively more reliant upon the evaporation of sweat, which is also gradient dependent.


Sweating And Skin Blood Flow Changes During Progressive Dehydration, Christiano Machado-Moreira, Joanne Caldwell, Anne Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A.S. Taylor Jan 2009

Sweating And Skin Blood Flow Changes During Progressive Dehydration, Christiano Machado-Moreira, Joanne Caldwell, Anne Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A.S. Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Cutaneous vasodilatation is essential for the convective delivery of heat from the body core to the periphery, whilst the evaporation of sweat dissipates this heat from the skin surface. Both of these physiological mechanisms must continue to function optimally for effective body temperature regulation to be sustained when exercising in the heat.


Cardiac Electrophysiology During Progressive And Controlled Dehydration: Inferences From Ecg Analysis During Steady-State Exercise And Recovery, Gregory E. Peoples, M. Brown, Anne M.J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Nigel A.S. Taylor Jan 2009

Cardiac Electrophysiology During Progressive And Controlled Dehydration: Inferences From Ecg Analysis During Steady-State Exercise And Recovery, Gregory E. Peoples, M. Brown, Anne M.J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Nigel A.S. Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

When fluid intake is insufficient to match sweat losses, dehydration develops. It is well established that dehydration impacts unfavourably upon cardiovascular function, including cardiac output and peripheral blood flow (Gonzalez-Alonso et al., 1998). However, the limitations of cardiac electrophysiology in the dehydrated state are not known. In light of possible electrolyte imbalances, particularly when water deficit moves towards 7% of total body mass, it is worth considering the possibility of adverse conduction changes, as reflected within the electrocardiogram (ECG), may accompany electrolyte loss. In addition, the ECG can also be employed to investigate other cardiac limitations, such as myocardial ischaemia ...


Immersion Cooling During Hyperthermia: Why Warmer May Be Better, Joanne N. Caldwell, Anne M. J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Mitchell J. Clark, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A. S Taylor Jan 2009

Immersion Cooling During Hyperthermia: Why Warmer May Be Better, Joanne N. Caldwell, Anne M. J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Mitchell J. Clark, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A. S Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

A significant number of military personnel suffer from exertional heat illness, with some extreme cases resulting in death. These illnesses may occur without warning, they are often characterised by a rapid onset and can occur even in experienced personnel. Various field treatments for hyperthermia have been developed, and one of particular interest is the use of cold-water immersion. Not surprisingly, immersion in ice-cold water (0-2oC) has been shown to be an effective means of rapidly reducing body core temperature (Proulx et al., 2003, 2006).


The Efficacy Of Saliva Osmolality As An Index Of Hydration State: Is It Worth The Spit?, Nigel A.S Taylor, Anne M. J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Christiano A. Machado-Moreira, Sheena Mcghee, Marc A. Brown, Mark J. Patterson, Gregory E. Peoples Jan 2009

The Efficacy Of Saliva Osmolality As An Index Of Hydration State: Is It Worth The Spit?, Nigel A.S Taylor, Anne M. J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Christiano A. Machado-Moreira, Sheena Mcghee, Marc A. Brown, Mark J. Patterson, Gregory E. Peoples

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Water represents ~60% of the body mass, ranging from 40-80% across individuals. In sedentary people, about 5-10% of this water is turned over daily, with urine flows averaging ~1.5 L.day-1 for normally hydrated individuals. However, when working in stressful environments for extended durations, particularly when wearing personal protective equipment, fluid losses via sweat secretion are dramatically elevated, and can approach 8-16 L.day-1. Indeed, during a moderate exercise-heat stress, whole-body sweat rates typically range between 1-1.5 L.h-1, and sustained and undefended fluid loss at this rate significantly impacts upon body water content, resulting in a 1 ...


Revisiting Indices Of Hydration State During Progressive Dehydration To A 7% Water Deficit, Nigel A.S. Taylor, Anne M.J. Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Sheena S. Mcghee, Christiano A. Machado-Moreira, Marc A. Brown, Gregory E. Peoples Jan 2009

Revisiting Indices Of Hydration State During Progressive Dehydration To A 7% Water Deficit, Nigel A.S. Taylor, Anne M.J. Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Sheena S. Mcghee, Christiano A. Machado-Moreira, Marc A. Brown, Gregory E. Peoples

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Taylor, N. A.S.., van den Heuvel, A. M.J.., Kerry, P., McGhee, S. S., Machado-Moreira, C. A., Brown, M. A. & Peoples, G. E. Revisiting indices of hydration state during progressive dehydration to a 7% water deficit. Thirteenth International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics; Boston, USA: 2009. 286-289.


The Roles Of Hands And Feet In Temperature Regulation In Hot And Cold Environments, Nigel A.S. Taylor, Christiano Machado-Moreira, Anne Van Den Heuvel, Joanne Caldwell, Elizabeth A. Taylor, Michael J. Tipton Jan 2009

The Roles Of Hands And Feet In Temperature Regulation In Hot And Cold Environments, Nigel A.S. Taylor, Christiano Machado-Moreira, Anne Van Den Heuvel, Joanne Caldwell, Elizabeth A. Taylor, Michael J. Tipton

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In this paper, we briefly review the physiological and biophysical characteristics of the hands and feet, and their association with autonomic (physiological) and behavioural temperature regulation, and with thermal injury. A comprehensive review of this topic is not currently available within the literature. The temperatures of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, particularly those of the hands and feet, vary significantly as air temperatures move away from the thermal comfort zone. Mean skin temperature increases approximately 0.7oC for each 1oC elevation in air temperature, with smaller changes at the hands (0.46o.oC-1) and slightly larger changes at the feet ...


Sweat Gland Recruitment Following Thermal And Psychological Stimuli, Christiano A. Machado-Moreira, Elizabeth Edkins, Alexandre S. Iabushita, Peter Maruca, Nigel A.S. Taylor Jan 2009

Sweat Gland Recruitment Following Thermal And Psychological Stimuli, Christiano A. Machado-Moreira, Elizabeth Edkins, Alexandre S. Iabushita, Peter Maruca, Nigel A.S. Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Eccrine sweat glands are present across almost the entire body surface. The distinction between glabrous (hairless) and non-glabrous skin has frequently been used to describe differences in human sudomotor function and, in particular, to help differentiate between the thermal and nonthermal mechanisms that modulate sweat secretion. Indeed, the widely accepted consensus is that psychological (psychogenic) sweating is limited to the glabrous regions, while thermally induced secretion occurs only from non-glabrous surfaces (Iwase et al., 1997). Furthermore, it is frequently assumed that independent central controllers, efferent pathways and different neurotransmitters activate the sweat glands within each of these regions. A recent ...


Fat Flat Frail Feet: How Does Obesity Affect The Older Foot, Julie R. Steele, Karen J. Mickle, Bridget J. Munro Jan 2009

Fat Flat Frail Feet: How Does Obesity Affect The Older Foot, Julie R. Steele, Karen J. Mickle, Bridget J. Munro

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The prevalence of obesity is rising throughout the world at an alarming rate, and the elderly are no exception with 15% of men and 28% of women aged over 60 years considered to be obese [1]. Overweight and obesity have been shown to negatively affect foot structure and function in both children [2] and adults [3]. These structural changes appear to be associated with increased foot discomfort whereby overweight children have been found to report foot pain significantly more often than their leaner counterparts [4]. As feet are our base of support during most weight-bearing activities, it is postulated that ...


Psychophysics Of Night Vision Device Halo, Robert S Allison, Tracey Brandwood, Margarita Vinnikov, James E. Zacher, Sion Jennings, Todd Macuda, Paul Thomas, Stephen A. Palmisano Jan 2009

Psychophysics Of Night Vision Device Halo, Robert S Allison, Tracey Brandwood, Margarita Vinnikov, James E. Zacher, Sion Jennings, Todd Macuda, Paul Thomas, Stephen A. Palmisano

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In modern Night Vision Devices (NVDs) halo around bright light sources remains a salient imaging artifact. Although a common feature of image intensified imagery, little is known of the perceptual and operational effects of this device limitation. This paper describes two related sets of experiments. In the first set of experiments, we provide quantitative measurements of Night Vision Device (NVD) halos formed by light sources as a function of intensity and distance. This characterization allows for analysis of the possible effects of halo on human perception through NVDs. In the second set of experiments, the effects of halation on the ...


Older Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Qualitative Study, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson Jan 2009

Older Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Qualitative Study, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background Research suggests that older patients may be reluctant to engage general practice registrars (GPRs) in their care. The authors undertook a qualitative study of the attitudes of older patients to GPRs to investigate this issue. Method Thirty-eight patients aged 60 years and over from three training practices participated in semistructured telephone interviews, which explored patients responses to GPRs. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using a template analysis approach. Results Analysis of the interviews produced five major themes concerning patient attitudes to GPRs: desire for continuity, desire for access, openness, trust and a desire for meaningful communication. Discussion ...


Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Review Of The Literature, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Samantha Reis, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson Jan 2009

Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Review Of The Literature, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Samantha Reis, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Introduction With the population ageing, it is imperative for training practices to provide GP registrars with sound experience in managing the health problems of older persons, especially chronic conditions. However, it is reported that a significant proportion of these patients will be resistant to consulting registrars, with concerns regarding disruption of continuity of care being a significant factor. The challenge for training practices is to identify approaches to engage registrars in the management of older patients whilst maintaining patient satisfaction. This paper presents a review of the literature on patient attitudes to general practice registrars to better understand the nature ...