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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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University of Wollongong

2001

Public relations

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Global Spin, Sharon Beder Jan 2001

Global Spin, Sharon Beder

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

This chapter examines the way that corporations have used their financial resources and power to counter the gains made by environmentalists, to reshape public opinion and to persuade politicians against increased environmental regulation. Corporate activism, ignited in the 1970s and rejuventated in the 1990s, has enabled a corporate agenda to dominate most debates about the state of the environment and what should be done about it. This situation poses grave dangers to the ability of democratic societies to respond to environmental threats.


The Promotion Of A Secular Work Ethic, Sharon Beder Jan 2001

The Promotion Of A Secular Work Ethic, Sharon Beder

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

[Extract] The compulsion to work has clearly become pathological in modern industrial societies. Millions of people are working long hours, devoting their lives to making or doing things that will not enrich their lives or make them happier but will add to the garbage and pollution that the earth is finding difficult to accommodate. They are so busy doing this that they have little time to spend with their family and friends, to develop other aspects of themselves, to participate in their communities as full citizens. ...... Despite the dysfunctionality of the work ethic it continues to be promoted and praised ...


Pharmaceutical Industry Agenda Setting In Mental Health Policies, R. Gosden, Sharon Beder Jan 2001

Pharmaceutical Industry Agenda Setting In Mental Health Policies, R. Gosden, Sharon Beder

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The development of political agenda-setting through the use of sophisticated public relations techniques is threatening to undermine the delicate balance of representative democracy. This has important ramifications for policies aimed at providing mental health services and the implementation of mental health laws. The principal agenda setters in this area are pharmaceutical companies with commercial reasons to promote public policies that expand the sales of their products. They have manufactured highly effective advocacy coalitions that incorporate front groups in order to set the policy agenda for mental health. However, policies tailored to their commercial purpose are not necessarily beneficial either for ...