Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Tonal Alignment And Segmental Timing In English-Speaking Children, Afua Blay Sep 2015

Tonal Alignment And Segmental Timing In English-Speaking Children, Afua Blay

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

Tonal alignment has been shown to be sensitive to segmental timing. This suggests that development of the former may be influenced by the latter. The developmental literature reports that English-speaking children do not attain adult-like competence in segmental timing until after age 6. While this suggests that the ability for alignment may be mastered after this age, this possibility is speculative due to paucity of data. Accordingly, the present study sought to determine whether 7- and 8-year old English-speaking children exhibit adult-like alignment and segmental timing in their speech. Seven children (ages 7 and 8) and 10 adults (ages 19 ...


Dialect Influence On California Chicano English, Laura Kompara Apr 2015

Dialect Influence On California Chicano English, Laura Kompara

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

Chicano English is a distinct U.S. English dialect common in California and the Southwestern United States. As Spanish immigrants from Mexico moved to the United States, especially throughout the 1990s, they learned English but carried some of the sounds and grammatical constructions from Spanish with them. Chicano English has become its own variety of English with organized linguistic patterns and must not be confused with English of second-language learners. This paper offers an accessible background piece to Chicano English in California and the ways that this dialect is changing due to contact with the surrounding dialects. The linguistic patterns ...


The Interaction Of Palatal Coarticulation And Palatal Harmony In Kazan Tatar, Jenna Conklin Apr 2015

The Interaction Of Palatal Coarticulation And Palatal Harmony In Kazan Tatar, Jenna Conklin

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

Vowel harmony and vowel-to-vowel coarticulation are long-distance assimilatory processes wherein certain vowels trigger systematic changes in adjacent vowels; harmony effects phonological change, resulting in phonemic alternation, while coarticulation effects phonetic change. This study examines the coarticulatory processes present in disharmonic words in Kazan Tatar, a language with left-to-right palatal harmony. While right-to-left palatal coarticulation is found to be widespread, left- to-right palatal coarticulation is virtually nonexistent in Tatar. It is hypothesized that gradient and categorical processes sharing the same triggers, targets, target feature, and direction cannot coexist; the diachronic implication for Tatar is that, once coarticulation was phonologized into harmony ...


Uses Of Someone: Beyond Simple Person Reference, Yu-Han Lin Apr 2015

Uses Of Someone: Beyond Simple Person Reference, Yu-Han Lin

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

This study looks at how the non-recognitional reference form “someone” is used to refer to a known referent when a recognitional, such as a first name or a descriptive recognitional (Stiver, 2007), is available (Sacks & Schegloff, 1979). In a conversation, when participants have shared knowledge about who a referent is, the occurrence of “someone” connotes more than a simple reference to the referent. While there is little previous research concerning the use of a non-recognitional to complete particular social actions, in this study, I show how “someone” can be employed to accomplish disaffiliative actions such as complaints, accusations and disassociation ...


The Role Of Antonymy On Semantic Change, Ashley M. Kentner Apr 2015

The Role Of Antonymy On Semantic Change, Ashley M. Kentner

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

The role of antonymy in semantic change is investigated via the etymology of sets of English antonyms. The results show a developmental pattern wherein two words sharing an antonym tend to exhibit similar trajectories of semantic development. Metaphorical extension is proposed as the primary mechanism that produces this regularity with antonymy playing a secondary role. These results further support semantic change as regular, even in contexts not involving grammaticalization, and that furthermore, metaphor is not peripheral to language use. (See Lakoff & Johnson, 1980; Traugott & Dasher, 2002; Hopper & Traugott, 2003.) There are also implications for formal and cognitive representations that rely on antonymous relationships for modeling aspects of gradable predicates (such as Paradis, 2001; Kennedy & McNally, 2005).


The (Statistical) Power Of Mechanical Turk, Amelia Kimball Jan 2014

The (Statistical) Power Of Mechanical Turk, Amelia Kimball

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

In this paper, I argue for the use of Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) in language research. AMT is an online marketplace of paid workers who may be used as subjects, which can greatly increase the statistical power of studies quickly and with minimal funding. I will show that—despite some obvious limitations of using distant subjects—properly designed experiments completed on AMT are trustworthy, cheap, and much faster than traditional face-to-face data collection. Not only this, but AMT workers may help with data analysis, which can greatly increase the scope of research that one researcher may carry out. This paper ...


A Unified Analysis Of Classifiers And Reduplication Across Nominal And Verbal Domains, Charles Lam Jan 2014

A Unified Analysis Of Classifiers And Reduplication Across Nominal And Verbal Domains, Charles Lam

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

This paper discusses the use of classifiers and reduplication in Cantonese. I propose a unified account for the syntax-semantics of both nouns and verbs, based on two functional layers: individuation and quantification. I demonstrate an abstract semantics that handles the interaction between classifiers and reduplication without reference to syntactic categories. Quantification (reduplication) and individuation (classifiers) can be treated as general semantic functions that subsume category-specific functions. The analysis also separates quantification from individuation to provide a natural explanation of durative readings of reduplicated unbounded events.


The Effects Of Pitch On Second Language Learners’ Categorical Perception Of Korean Alveolar Lax And Tense Stops, Ho Eun Park Jan 2014

The Effects Of Pitch On Second Language Learners’ Categorical Perception Of Korean Alveolar Lax And Tense Stops, Ho Eun Park

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

Because English speakers use voice onset time (VOT) as their main cue to discriminate L1- English stops, it would be interesting to see if L1-Engish learners of L2-Korean use fundamental frequency (f0) effectively to distinguish Korean contrastive stops, for which f0 is known to be important. Thirteen English learners of Korean participated in an AX discrimination task. Results showed that f0 significantly affected the learners’ perception of Korean alveolar lax-tense stops, demonstrating that English learners were sensitive to f0 in L2 despite its absence as a main cue in L1.


The Role Of The Input In Young Children’S Speech Production Is Modulated By Syllable Position, Yuanyuan Wang Jan 2014

The Role Of The Input In Young Children’S Speech Production Is Modulated By Syllable Position, Yuanyuan Wang

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

The aim of the current study is to investigate the role of the input on an English-speaking child’s production of fricatives in onset and coda positions. Transcript data from a child-mother dyad from Providence Corpus (Demuth, Culbertson & Alter 2006) in CHILDES database (MacWhinney 2000) was examined. The child and the adult production frequency of fricatives in both onset and coda positions were calculated. The results suggested the role of the input in child’s production was modulated by syllable position; more specifically, the child’s production of fricatives was predicted by the mother’s input frequency better in coda position than in onset position. This study sheds light on the ways in which the input may interact with innate learning biases during the course of language acquisition.


Proceedings Of The 9th Pla Symposium, Charles Bradley, Charles Lam, Mengxi Lin Jan 2014

Proceedings Of The 9th Pla Symposium, Charles Bradley, Charles Lam, Mengxi Lin

Purdue Linguistic Association Symposium

This is the combined conference proceedings of the 9th annual Purdue Linguistics Association (PLA) Symposium.