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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Do Social Values Trump Economics For Wealthy Voters: An Empirical Analysis Of "Trading And Voting", Michael C. Gurock Jan 2018

Do Social Values Trump Economics For Wealthy Voters: An Empirical Analysis Of "Trading And Voting", Michael C. Gurock

Wharton Research Scholars

Yilmaz and Musto (2003) theorized that with access to equity markets and theoretical election-contingent securities, voters could financially hedge against the outcome of an election so that social values and ideology were the only factors determining their vote. Mattozzi (2008) found that creating a portfolio of such election-contingent securities was realistic. This paper examines if this may be happening in practice by creating an index of economic and social variables within congressional districts compared to the district’s vote for Trump in the election. Looking at wealthier districts where voters are more likely to have investments, I find that only ...


Speculation And Price Indeterminacy In Financial Markets, Shyam Sunder Jun 2016

Speculation And Price Indeterminacy In Financial Markets, Shyam Sunder

Shyam Sunder

No abstract provided.


Investment Horizons And Inedeterminancy In Financial Markets, Shyam Sunder Jun 2015

Investment Horizons And Inedeterminancy In Financial Markets, Shyam Sunder

Shyam Sunder

No abstract provided.


Investment Horizons And Indeterminancy In Financial Markets, Shyam Sunder Jun 2015

Investment Horizons And Indeterminancy In Financial Markets, Shyam Sunder

Shyam Sunder

No abstract provided.


Essays On The Impacts Of Quantitative Easing On Financial Markets, Joanne Guo Feb 2015

Essays On The Impacts Of Quantitative Easing On Financial Markets, Joanne Guo

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Due to the severity of the financial crisis of 2008, the Federal Reserve had attempted a variety of unconventional monetary policy to support the U.S. financial markets at the verge of collapse. The most well-known of the Fed's unconventional monetary policy is quantitative easing, in which it purchased a large amount of government securities from the markets in order to lower longer term interest rates and mortgage rates. The several rounds of quantitative easing had different impacts, intended as well as unintended, on U.S. financial markets and foreign markets. The purpose of this paper is to fully ...


Singapore's Financial Market: Challenges And Future Prospects, David K. C. Lee, Kok Fai Phoon Jul 2014

Singapore's Financial Market: Challenges And Future Prospects, David K. C. Lee, Kok Fai Phoon

Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

Singapore has successfully developed into one of the leading international financial centers in a short span of less than half a century. The factors of success can be attributed to time, space, and people. Given the complexity and connectivity of today’s markets, there are many challenges in a fast changing environment marked by huge global capital flows and punctuated by crisis after crisis. This chapter will explain the success of Singapore’s financial market and provide the author’s outlook for the island state’s future prospects in the aftermath of the US debt crisis, the Euro crisis, and ...


Putting Retirement At Risk: Has Financial Risk Exposure Grown More Quickly For Older Households Than Younger Ones?, Christian Weller, Sara Bernardo Jan 2014

Putting Retirement At Risk: Has Financial Risk Exposure Grown More Quickly For Older Households Than Younger Ones?, Christian Weller, Sara Bernardo

Gerontology Institute Publications

Financial markets have been characterized by boom and bust cycles since the 1980s, while the responsibility for managing retirement wealth has increasingly shifted onto individual households at the same time. Policymakers and experts have expressed concern over rising risk exposure among older households, who appear to be increasingly exposed to the growing financial risks just as they near retirement. We consider household data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances from 1989 to 2010 to analyze the correlation between age and risk exposure. We test if older households’ risk exposure has indeed grown over time, if it has ...


Shareholders And Social Welfare, William W. Bratton, Michael L. Wachter Jan 2013

Shareholders And Social Welfare, William W. Bratton, Michael L. Wachter

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This article addresses the question whether (and how) the shareholders matter for social welfare. Answers to the question have changed over time. Observers in the mid-twentieth century believed that the socio-economic characteristics of real world shareholders were highly pertinent to social welfare inquiries. But they went on to conclude that there followed no justification for catering to shareholder interest, for shareholders occupied elite social strata. The answer changed during the twentieth century’s closing decades, when observers came to accord the shareholder interest a key structural role in the enhancement of economic efficiency even as they also deemed irrelevant the ...


Neoliberalism And The Global Financial Crisis, Sharon Beder May 2011

Neoliberalism And The Global Financial Crisis, Sharon Beder

Sharon Beder

The new right advocated policies that aided the accumulation of profits and wealth in fewer hands with the argument that it would promote investment, thereby creating more jobs and more prosperity for all. However financial markets provide opportunities for investment without creating jobs and, as the global financial crisis has revealed, speculative investment feeds an ephemeral prosperity that can be wiped out in a short time period. Inequities resulting from new right policies – including the deregulation of labour markets and the reduction of government spending – reduced consumer demand which had to be propped up with consumer credit and mortgage debt ...


African Financial Systems: A Review, Franklin Allen, Isaac Otchere, Lemma W. Senbet Apr 2011

African Financial Systems: A Review, Franklin Allen, Isaac Otchere, Lemma W. Senbet

Finance Papers

We start by providing an overview of financial systems in the African continent. We then consider the regions of Arab North Africa, West Africa, East and Central Africa, and Southern Africa in more detail. The paper covers, among other things, central banks, deposit-taking banks, non-bank institutions, such as the stock markets, fixed income markets, insurance markets, and microfinance institutions.


Neoliberalism And The Global Financial Crisis, Sharon Beder Jan 2009

Neoliberalism And The Global Financial Crisis, Sharon Beder

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The new right advocated policies that aided the accumulation of profits and wealth in fewer hands with the argument that it would promote investment, thereby creating more jobs and more prosperity for all. However financial markets provide opportunities for investment without creating jobs and, as the global financial crisis has revealed, speculative investment feeds an ephemeral prosperity that can be wiped out in a short time period. Inequities resulting from new right policies – including the deregulation of labour markets and the reduction of government spending – reduced consumer demand which had to be propped up with consumer credit and mortgage debt ...


Do Stationary Risk Premia Explain It All?: Evidence From The Term Structure, Martin D. D. Evans Apr 1994

Do Stationary Risk Premia Explain It All?: Evidence From The Term Structure, Martin D. D. Evans

Finance Papers

Predictable variations in excess returns have often been attributed to the presence of time-varying risk premia. In this paper, we use an insight based upon new techniques from time series analysis to test whether stationary risk premia can alone explain the behavior of excess returns to long bonds relative to rolling over short rates. Surprisingly, we reject this hypothesis using U.S. T-bill returns. We then show that either permanent shocks to the risk premia and/or rationally anticipated shifts in the interest rate process could produce anomalous results.