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Archaeological Anthropology

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Teaching With Technology: Digital Tools For Archaeological Education, Caroline Gardiner Jul 2019

Teaching With Technology: Digital Tools For Archaeological Education, Caroline Gardiner

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Recent technological advances have greatly altered how scholars record, study, and educate the public about cultural resources. Data can now be instantly recorded, analyzed, and widely shared. Digital tools can help create multimedia, interactive products that have contributed greatly to education and outreach initiatives worldwide.

Both the National Park Service (NPS) and the National Council for Preservation Education (NCPE) are dedicated to studying, preserving, and educating the public about cultural resources. A recent internship project between these two institutions produced online lesson plans that educated students about cultural materials and the various methodologies scholars use to study them within archaeology ...


Late Classic Soil Conservation And Agricultural Production In The Three Rivers Region, Byron Smith, Stanton Morse Jun 2019

Late Classic Soil Conservation And Agricultural Production In The Three Rivers Region, Byron Smith, Stanton Morse

Humboldt Journal of Social Relations

Agricultural production during the Classic Period (c.1,700 to 1050 BP) in the Central Maya Lowlands was comprised of a variety of techniques that were used to satisfy dietary needs and to stimulate its subsistence economy. The complexity of those methods was a consequence of a variable topography and previous forest management practices that likely resulted in wide-spread deforestation, and subsequently large-scale erosion which limited arable land. The Classic Maya solution to limitations in arable land, augmented by increased erosion seems to have come in the form of geotechnical constructions placed in a variety of positions along the contours ...


Mapping Maya Hinterlands: Lidar Derived Visualization To Identify Small Scale Features In Northwestern Belize, Jeremy Mcfarland, Marisol Cortes-Rincon Ph.D. Jun 2019

Mapping Maya Hinterlands: Lidar Derived Visualization To Identify Small Scale Features In Northwestern Belize, Jeremy Mcfarland, Marisol Cortes-Rincon Ph.D.

Humboldt Journal of Social Relations

This paper will discuss the processes and methods of relief visualization of LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEM’s) and classification of secondary data to identify archaeological remains on the ancient Maya landscape in northwestern Belize. The basis of the research explores various Geographic Information System (GIS) and cartographic techniques to visualize topographical relief. Graphic terrain maps assist archaeologists with predictive settlement patterns. The Relief Visualization Toolbox (RVT 1.3) aids to visualize raster DEM datasets in the predictive identification and interpretation of small-scale archaeological features. This dataset and methodology can be utilized to answer questions of population estimates, mobility costs ...


Service Learning In Archaeology And Its Impact On Perceptions Of Cultural Heritage And Historic Preservation, Kyle P. Freund, Laura K. Clark, Kevin Gidusko May 2019

Service Learning In Archaeology And Its Impact On Perceptions Of Cultural Heritage And Historic Preservation, Kyle P. Freund, Laura K. Clark, Kevin Gidusko

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This paper focuses on a for-credit cemetery recording class taught at Indian River State College (IRSC) and on the impact of the project on student perceptions of cultural heritage and historic preservation. One of the goals in creating this service learning course was to promote student awareness of the destructive risks that many historic cemeteries face and to impart the importance of stewardship over the archaeological record. To assess the effectiveness of the course in meeting this goal, a series of five interviews with students enrolled in the class were conducted to get participants to discuss their motivations and perceptions ...


The Alma College Archaeological Project: Toward A Community-Based Pedagogy, Kristin Landau Apr 2019

The Alma College Archaeological Project: Toward A Community-Based Pedagogy, Kristin Landau

Journal of Archaeology and Education

The turn toward community-based research in archaeology is “transforming” the discipline. No longer can we show up with screens and trowels wielding government permits and expect to start digging. Community-based archaeological projects may never even get to the excavation phase if local collaborators are uninterested or have other priorities. Now that collaboration with local populations has become standard archaeological practice, it is imperative to begin incorporating community engagement into traditional field schools. Today’s archaeology requires grassroots organizing, cultural awareness, and sensitive listening skills, in addition to digging square holes and drawing tree roots to scale. In this paper, I ...


In The Name Of Profit: Canada’S Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Reserve As Economic Development And Colonial Placemaking, Richard M. Hutchings, Marina La Salle Apr 2019

In The Name Of Profit: Canada’S Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Reserve As Economic Development And Colonial Placemaking, Richard M. Hutchings, Marina La Salle

Landscapes: the Journal of the International Centre for Landscape and Language

Taking a critical heritage approach to late modern naming and placemaking, we discuss how the power to name reflects the power to control people, their land, their past, and ultimately their future. Our case study is the Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Reserve (MABR), a recently invented place on Vancouver Island, located in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Through analysis of representations and landscape, we explore MABR as state-sanctioned branding, where a dehumanized nature is packaged for and marketed to wealthy ecotourists. Greenwashed by a feel-good “sustainability” discourse, MABR constitutes colonial placemaking and economic development, representing no break with past practices.


Putting Archaeology And Anthropology Into Schools: A 2019 Update, Colleen P. Popson, Ruth O. Selig Mar 2019

Putting Archaeology And Anthropology Into Schools: A 2019 Update, Colleen P. Popson, Ruth O. Selig

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Our 2012 article, “Putting Anthropology Into Schools,” argued that integrating anthropology and archaeology into K-12 schools must involve teacher preparation, state certification requirements, and in-service training. National anthropology and archaeology organizations’ decades-long push for the integration of their disciplines into schools was outlined but assessed as relatively limited compared to successful efforts in psychology, sociology, and economics. Some progress did occur, traced primarily to the National Science Foundation and other funders, alongside committed individuals with well-developed curriculum materials. Our 2019 publication includes the original article followed by an UPDATE outlining developments since 2012. Reports from the National Academies and the ...


How Carnivorous Are We? The Implication For Protein Consumption, Miki Ben-Dor Feb 2019

How Carnivorous Are We? The Implication For Protein Consumption, Miki Ben-Dor

Journal of Evolution and Health

No abstract provided.


Archaeology In The Classroom At A New England Prep School, Ryan Wheeler Feb 2019

Archaeology In The Classroom At A New England Prep School, Ryan Wheeler

Journal of Archaeology and Education

In 1901 Robert S. Peabody lamented the lack of instruction in archaeology at his high school alma mater Phillips Academy, a prestigious New England boarding school. To rectify the situation, he used family funds and artifacts amassed by his personal curator Warren K. Moorehead to establish a Department of Archaeology at the school. A building was constructed and Moorehead and Peabody’s son, Charles, set about teaching classes. The pattern established by Moorehead and Peabody, however, was disrupted in 1914 when the school refocused the program exclusively on research. Classes were offered periodically over the next decades, and some students ...


Incorporating Field Excavations In Introduction To Archaeology, Rebecca M. Dean Feb 2019

Incorporating Field Excavations In Introduction To Archaeology, Rebecca M. Dean

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Most archaeology students first experience field work during a field school aimed at upper-division undergraduate majors. An excavation component in an Introduction to Archaeology class, however, can create an unequaled educational experience for students at all levels of experience and interest in archaeology. Excavations help students to master basic field methods, understand the nature of archaeological inference, recognize the strengths and limitations of archaeological data, grapple with archaeological ethics, and foster a sense of archaeological stewardship. This paper explores the outcomes of providing a field experience in the introductory class at the University of Minnesota Morris, the liberal arts campus ...


Current Research: Building A Corpus Of Crockett Curvilinear Incised Vessels, Duncan P. Mckinnon Jan 2019

Current Research: Building A Corpus Of Crockett Curvilinear Incised Vessels, Duncan P. Mckinnon

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

As presented in an earlier report (McKinnon 2018), I have been compiling, with the help of several Caddo researchers, a comprehensive multi-state database of Caddo vessels (now close to 15,000). The on-going goal is to evaluate landscape scale social interactions and interregional relationships using this growing ceramic database. Some initial explorations have been productive in evaluating relationships between proposed Caddo communities (archaeological phases) and I suggest that these exercises have offered insights into Caddo interaction, identity, and ideological exchange in a visual and (continually) comprehensive way (McKinnon 2011, 2016).


An Ancestral Caddo Site (41cs125) On The Sulphur River At Lake Wright Patman, Cass County, Texas, Julian A. Sitters, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2019

An Ancestral Caddo Site (41cs125) On The Sulphur River At Lake Wright Patman, Cass County, Texas, Julian A. Sitters, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

ln December 2017, AmaTerra Environmental lnc. conducted an intensive archeological survey of 41CS125, a previously reported ancestral Caddo site at Lake Wright Patman in Cass County, Texas. The work was done at the request of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District in advance of a proposed bank stabilization pro}ect. The site was occupied from the Late Paleoindian period through historic times with extensive occupations during the Formative to Early Caddo and Late Caddo periods. Artifacts recovered in the investigations included both arrow and dart points, lithic debitage, bifaces, ground stone, a celt fragment, pitted stone ...


A Preliminary Comparison Of Two Caddo Mound Sites In Southwest Arkansas, Mary Beth D. Trubitt Jan 2019

A Preliminary Comparison Of Two Caddo Mound Sites In Southwest Arkansas, Mary Beth D. Trubitt

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Previous Arkansas Archeological Survey excavations at the Hedges site in the Ouachita River valley and the Hughes site in the Saline River valley uncovered evidence of burned structures adjacent to the mounds. An overview of the artifact analyses indicates that the sites were roughly contemporaneous, with intensive use by ancestral Caddo Indians during the Late Caddo period, between the AD 1400s and 1600s. This presentation summarizes the research .ftndings to emphasize comparisons in timing, activities, and community plans.


In Between Two Worlds: Past Perspectives On The Neosho Phase (A.D. 1400-1650), Paige Ford Jan 2019

In Between Two Worlds: Past Perspectives On The Neosho Phase (A.D. 1400-1650), Paige Ford

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Neosho phase (A.D. 1400-1650) in northeastern Oklahoma, northwestern Arkansas, southwestern Missouri, and southeastern Kansas represents Late Pre-contact peoples engaged in widespread trade from the Plains to groups in the southeastern United States. The phase has confounded researchers since its de.ftnition, although debates mainly concern one of two main questions concerning the identity of Neosho peoples: origins and cultural af.ftliation. Most research to date has focused simply on the question of emergence. Early in these debates, Orr (1946) suggested that Neosho peoples represented one or more plains-oriented groups that had migrated into the area, while Wyckoff (1980 ...


Caddo Pottery From Eight Sites In The Middle Ouachita River Valley, Mary Beth D. Trubitt Jan 2019

Caddo Pottery From Eight Sites In The Middle Ouachita River Valley, Mary Beth D. Trubitt

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Documentation and analysis of ceramic vessels in the Joint Educational Consortium's Hodges Collection has focused on reconstructing grave lots based on notes left by amateur archeologist Vere Huddleston in the 1930s and 1940s. Despite problems with the data, we can glean useful information from this collection. Here, l describe Caddo pottery and other artifacts in grave lots from eight sites in Clark and Hot Spring counties of west-central Arkansas. l then order the grave lots in time based on stylistic and technological characteristics (seriation) to re.ftne the ceramic chronology of the Middle Ouachita River valley and compare mortuary ...


Current Research: Discovery And Recovery Of A 14th Century Dugout Canoe On The Red River, Caddo Parish, Louisiana, Jeffrey S. Girard, Charles R. Mcgimsey Jan 2019

Current Research: Discovery And Recovery Of A 14th Century Dugout Canoe On The Red River, Caddo Parish, Louisiana, Jeffrey S. Girard, Charles R. Mcgimsey

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In June 2017, Jenna Bradley and Robert Cornett were boating down the Red River in northern Caddo Parish, Louisiana, when they noticed an unusual log protruding from a sandy bank near the town of Belcher. After realizing that it was a dugout canoe, they contacted the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, and eventually word of the find was transmitted to state archaeologist Chip McGimsey at the Louisiana Division of Archaeology. The following day, Bradley and Cornett led Jeffrey Girard and Jameel Damlouji of the Louisiana Archaeological Society to the site. It was obvious that it was a dugout canoe ...


Current Research: Organic Residues On Engraved Vessels From Ancestral Caddo Sites In East Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2019

Current Research: Organic Residues On Engraved Vessels From Ancestral Caddo Sites In East Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In the course of recently documenting ancestral Caddo ceramic vessels from sites dating to Late Caddo period Titus phase contexts (ca. A.D. 1430-1680) in East Texas, specifically on sites in the Big Cypress Creek and Sabine River basins, I have encountered a significant number (ca. 9.6 percent) of more than 1790 engraved fine ware vessels that have an exterior organic residue (Table 1), including carinated bowls, compound bowls, jars, bowls, and even bottles. In some cases, the exterior residue on certain carinated bowls and compound bowls is so thick that the engraved design is obscured and almost completely ...


Current Research: Analysis Of Ceramic Vessel Residues From The Washington Square Mound Site (41na49) For Evidence Of Peyote Use By The Caddo In The 13th-15th Centuries A.D., Timothy K. Perttula, Martin Terry Jan 2019

Current Research: Analysis Of Ceramic Vessel Residues From The Washington Square Mound Site (41na49) For Evidence Of Peyote Use By The Caddo In The 13th-15th Centuries A.D., Timothy K. Perttula, Martin Terry

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In 2012, Perttula requested permission from to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma's Repatriation Committee to analyze small samples (ca. 1-2 grams of ceramic paste, or sherds ca. 1-2 square centimeters in size) from the paste of five vessels from Features 31 and 95 at the Washington Square Mound site (41NA49) (Perttula et al. 2010) in East Texas to identify residue traces of the Caddo's use of peyote in the 13th-15th centuries A.D. The Caddo Nation of Oklahoma gave their permission to conduct these ceramic vessel residue studies.


Current Research: Spiro And Caddoan Connections On The Northern Frontier Of Southwest Missouri, Jack H. Ray Jan 2019

Current Research: Spiro And Caddoan Connections On The Northern Frontier Of Southwest Missouri, Jack H. Ray

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Excavations during the construction of Table Rock Lake in the late 1950s resulted in a proposition that there was a colonization of peoples into the upper White River drainage from Caddoan areas to the southwest (Chapman 1980; Chapman et al. 1960). This colonization, which resulted in the formulation of the Loftin phase, is widely accepted today (O'Brien and Wood 1998; Perttula 1983, 1989; Sabo and Early 1990). Later, James Brown (1984) exposed the myth that the southwestern Ozarks was a cultural enclave that lagged behind Mississippian developments in other parts of the Trans-Mississippi South.


Current Research: Renewing Research On Holman Springs (3sv29), A Caddo Saltworks In Western Arkansas, Carl G. Drexler, Fiona M. Taylor Jan 2019

Current Research: Renewing Research On Holman Springs (3sv29), A Caddo Saltworks In Western Arkansas, Carl G. Drexler, Fiona M. Taylor

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Holman Springs site (3SV29) lies in western Sevier County, Arkansas, near the Oklahoma border. It is, along with Bayou Sel (3CL27), one of two major excavations of Caddo saltworks that has not been substantially reported. Excavated between 1984 and 1986 by the Arkansas Archeological Society during their annual Training Program digs, the collections remain at the Arkansas Archeological Survey's research station (ARAS) at Southern Arkansas University (SAU) in Magnolia.

The collections lay dormant for many years. Then, in 2015, the station staff revived the project and started moving it towards completion. This is a daunting challenge, given the ...


Current Research: Archiving Our History, Publishing Results: Current Research At The Arkansas Archeological Survey's Henderson State University Research Station, Mary Beth D. Trubitt Jan 2019

Current Research: Archiving Our History, Publishing Results: Current Research At The Arkansas Archeological Survey's Henderson State University Research Station, Mary Beth D. Trubitt

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

At the Arkansas Archeological Survey's Henderson State University (HSU) Research Station, we continue to inventory curated artifact collections. The research station has been on the HSU campus in Arkadelphia since 1967, and our collections include artifacts, photographs, maps, and field and lab records from projects as well as artifact donations from local residents. Field notes and lab forms have been scanned and archived on the server, and we are in the process of scanning the station's collection of 14,000 color slides. Assisted by volunteers, we have been inventorying artifacts, updating station databases, and submitting site revisit forms ...


Report: Abstracts From The 2018 Caddo Conference In Idabel, Oklahoma, Amanda L. Regnier Jan 2019

Report: Abstracts From The 2018 Caddo Conference In Idabel, Oklahoma, Amanda L. Regnier

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The 2018 Caddo Conference was held March 8-10, 2018 at the Museum of the Red River in Idabel, Oklahoma. Fifty attendees registered for the conference. The conference began with a reception at the museum on Thursday evening. On Friday, the program included eight papers and presentations covering archaeological work in Texas and Oklahoma and a longer presentation on the rebuilding of the Caddo house at Caddo Mounds State Park in Texas. A poster session was also held on Friday afternoon. Conference attendees were given a tour of the collections housed at the museum, which include a large collection of Caddo ...


What College Students Learn From Teaching Others, Larkin N. Hood Dec 2018

What College Students Learn From Teaching Others, Larkin N. Hood

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This article describes what undergraduate students learned from participating in a museum docent program at a large, public university on the West Coast of the United States. The majority (93%) of students report an increase in their ability to effectively communicate specialized knowledge to museum visitors in one or more of the following ways: 1) identifying what visitors know and adjusting their explanations accordingly; 2) translating technical information to visitors; 3); communicating information in an active, hands-on manner; 4) confidently communicating their knowledge to others. Students reported personal and professional benefits as well. In addition to this focused observation approach ...


Key To The Past: Community Perceptions Of Yup’Ik Youth Interaction With Culturally Relevant Education Inspired By The Nunalleq Archaeology Project, Sean R. O'Rourke, Justin J. Turner, Krista Ritchie Nov 2018

Key To The Past: Community Perceptions Of Yup’Ik Youth Interaction With Culturally Relevant Education Inspired By The Nunalleq Archaeology Project, Sean R. O'Rourke, Justin J. Turner, Krista Ritchie

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This study qualitatively describes a) the implementation of culturally relevant education (CRE) programs for Yup’ik youth in Quinhagak, Alaska that developed from the Nunalleq Project—a nearby archaeological excavation—and b) community members’ and program facilitators’ perceptions of associated youth social and psychological outcomes. Ten semi-structured interviews (seven community members, three program facilitators) were undertaken and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Community members and program facilitators attributed numerous outcomes to the Nunalleq-related CRE, such as imparting practical skills (e.g., wilderness survival, artistic and technological skills), teaching young people to value their heritage (e.g., educating them about the ...


Nature, Place, And Story: Rethinking Historic Sites In Canada By Claire Campbell, Emma K. Morgan-Thorp Aug 2018

Nature, Place, And Story: Rethinking Historic Sites In Canada By Claire Campbell, Emma K. Morgan-Thorp

The Goose

Review of Claire Campbell's Nature, Place, and Story: Rethinking Historic Sites in Canada.


Say What?: Demystifying Discourse Analysis For Archaeology Students, Cynthia L. Van Gilder Jun 2018

Say What?: Demystifying Discourse Analysis For Archaeology Students, Cynthia L. Van Gilder

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Most archaeology instructors are eager to have their students appreciate that the study of the past is relevant to the present. In fact, most current introductory textbooks include a section, however brief it may be, on the socio-politics of archaeology. These discussions are usually framed around how ideas about the past have been used to justify abuse (e.g., Nazi archaeology to support an Aryan homeland), or how the involvement of descendant communities in research is now considered best practice in the field (e.g., NAGPRA, community based archaeology). One of the most powerful tools for understanding how what we ...


The Multi-Vocal Trailscape Of The Natchitoches Trace: A Trail Of Tears, Trade And Transformation, Jade L. Robison Mar 2018

The Multi-Vocal Trailscape Of The Natchitoches Trace: A Trail Of Tears, Trade And Transformation, Jade L. Robison

Landscapes: the Journal of the International Centre for Landscape and Language

This paper demonstrates how individuals have inscribed the Natchitoches Trace trailscape with meaningful narratives via oral traditions, historical accounts and material evidence, and considers how descendent populations curate their heritage in such a landscape. Beginning at the mouth of the Missouri River near St. Louis, the Natchitoches Trace stretches southwest through the Ozark region in Missouri and Arkansas, and onto Natchitoches, Louisiana. Created by pre-Columbian groups for trading purposes, the trail was later utilised by early European pioneer families for westward expansion. The 1830 Indian Removal Act forced the repurposing of the trail as a route of exile for displaced ...


Digital Bridges Across Disciplinary, Practical And Pedagogical Divides: An Online Professional Master’S Program In Heritage Resource Management, John R. Welch, David V. Burley, Jonathan C. Driver, Erin A. Hogg, Kanthi Jayasundera, Michael Klassen, David Maxwell, George P. Nicholas, Janet Pivnick, Christopher D. Dore Feb 2018

Digital Bridges Across Disciplinary, Practical And Pedagogical Divides: An Online Professional Master’S Program In Heritage Resource Management, John R. Welch, David V. Burley, Jonathan C. Driver, Erin A. Hogg, Kanthi Jayasundera, Michael Klassen, David Maxwell, George P. Nicholas, Janet Pivnick, Christopher D. Dore

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Growth and diversification in heritage resource management (HRM) archaeology since the 1960s have created new demands for training the next generations of HRM leaders and for addressing persistent and counterproductive divisions between academic and applied archaeologies. The Simon Fraser University Department of Archaeology (SFU) has responded to these demands with an all-new, cohort-based, thesis-focused graduate program created by and for HRM professionals. The program’s target audience is HRM practitioners who hold Bachelor’s credentials, have initiated promising careers in HRM, and desire advanced, research-focused degrees to enable their professional capacity and upward mobility. The SFU program is structured and ...


Chinese Export Porcelain: Similarities And Differences Between Independent Nations, Australia And The United States Of America, Erica Selly Feb 2018

Chinese Export Porcelain: Similarities And Differences Between Independent Nations, Australia And The United States Of America, Erica Selly

Scholarly Horizons: University of Minnesota, Morris Undergraduate Journal

This paper examines various archaeological sites from both Australia and the United States in order to compare the early consumption of Chinese Export Porcelain; how the amounts of porcelain found on site reflected wealth and status in both nations, and differences in preferred design.


Teaching Bones From My Garden, John C. Whittaker Jan 2018

Teaching Bones From My Garden, John C. Whittaker

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Abstract

Faunal analysis, or zooarchaeology, is an important subfield that provides information on human ecology, economy, culture, and society. Few of my students have much experience with hunting, farming, anatomy, or even eating meat these days, so faunal analysis labs in an Archaeological Field Methods class present some difficulties.

Faunal assemblages from archaeological sites are often small, fragile, and too valuable for class use. They require good comparative collections, and it may be difficult for students to relate to unfamiliar animals and cultures.

These problems can be overcome by producing a faunal teaching assemblage from home meat consumption. For over ...