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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

False Frontiers: Archaeology And The Myth Of The Canadian Wilderness, Joshua Dent Apr 2013

False Frontiers: Archaeology And The Myth Of The Canadian Wilderness, Joshua Dent

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

Terra nullius provided a, now defunct, legal allowance for colonial activities in North America. No longer widely used, the concept persists in the widespread use of the term wilderness. Inferring that the Canadian landscape is largely unaltered, pathless, and without attached meaning, wilderness negates the creation and maintenance of Indigenous landscapes. The myth that much of the Canadian landscape consists of pristine and untouched wilderness is perpetuated by several aspects of Canadian society: the natural resource industry, environmentalists, wilderness tourism, and Canadian nationalism. Each of these areas benefits from or exploits in some way, the concept of wilderness. Archaeology, through ...


Interpreting Stable Carbon And Nitrogen Isotope Ratios In Archaeological Remains: An Overview Of The Processes Influencing The Δ13c And Δ15n Values Of Type I Collagen, Alexander J. Leatherdale Apr 2013

Interpreting Stable Carbon And Nitrogen Isotope Ratios In Archaeological Remains: An Overview Of The Processes Influencing The Δ13c And Δ15n Values Of Type I Collagen, Alexander J. Leatherdale

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

The application of isotopic ratio mass spectrometry to archaeological science has produced many important contributions to the study and understanding of ancient human and animal populations. Paleodietary reconstruction through the analysis of stable isotope ratios in skeletal, dental, and soft tissue remains presents another avenue for interpreting the past. The methodology employed to obtain isotopic data from archaeological remains directly influences the types of questions that can be addressed and the interpretation of the data. Furthermore, there are fundamental idiosyncrasies of archaeological specimens and their ante- and post-mortem environments that may influence the results of an isotopic study. This paper ...


Re-Thinking The Value Of 20th-Century Archaeological Sites In Canada, Colleen Haukaas Apr 2013

Re-Thinking The Value Of 20th-Century Archaeological Sites In Canada, Colleen Haukaas

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

Though archaeological sites dating to the 20th century in Ontario are eligible for protection under the recently updated Standards and Guidelines for Consulting Archaeologists, many archaeologists do not consider them to valuable heritage resources. In academic archaeology in other parts of Canada, however, 20th-century sites have proven to be useful in archaeological research in several ways. This paper will discuss how 20th-century archaeological sites are investigated in Ontario, and then compare case studies from academic archaeology in the Yukon, British Columbia, and Newfoundland and Labrador where recent archaeological sites were found to be valuable to ...


Excavating Zion: Archaeology And Nation-Making In Palestine/Israel, Peige Desjarlais Apr 2013

Excavating Zion: Archaeology And Nation-Making In Palestine/Israel, Peige Desjarlais

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

This paper demonstrates that archaeological discourse and practice in Palestine/Israel is intertwined with a nation-making project of settler colonialism that contains both spatial and temporal dimensions. This project primarily serves to invent a link between the ancient Israelite past and the modern Israeli state, presenting colonization as “return” to “the homeland” through familiar narratives of frontier settlement. This article proposes that Israeli archaeological practices not only help to reproduce these narratives, but also participate in the inscription of the national territory as Jewish, and the consequent dispossession of the Palestinians