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Archaeological Anthropology

The University of Maine

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Discussion Meeting The Challenge With An Integrated Model For Archaeology Education, Joanne E. Lea Sep 2020

Discussion Meeting The Challenge With An Integrated Model For Archaeology Education, Joanne E. Lea

Journal of Archaeology and Education

The articles in this issue represent collaborations based on papers presented in the session “The Other Grand Challenge: Archaeological Education & Pedagogy in the Next 50 Years” at the 2017 Chacmool Conference at the University of Calgary. A model for Archaeology Education emerged, which integrated accessibility, collaboration, and engagement by focusing on communication. It built on the foundations of Public Archaeology and Archaeology Education in the past, asked us to question our truths and practices in the present, and provided examples and direction for Archaeology Education in the future.


Grand Challenge No. 5: Communicating Archaeology Outreach And Narratives In Professional Practice, Todd J. Kristensen, Meigan Henry, Kevin Brownlee, Adrian Praetzellis, Myra Sitchon Sep 2020

Grand Challenge No. 5: Communicating Archaeology Outreach And Narratives In Professional Practice, Todd J. Kristensen, Meigan Henry, Kevin Brownlee, Adrian Praetzellis, Myra Sitchon

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Communicating archaeology to non-expert audiences can convey the role and value of the discipline, implant respect for heritage, and connect descendant communities to their past. A challenge facing archaeology communicators is to translate complex ideas while retaining their richness and maximizing audience engagement. This article discusses how archaeologists can effectively communicate with non-experts using narrative and visual tools. We provide a communication strategy and three case studies from North America. The examples include the packaging of archaeological theory in the shape of mystery novels for student consumption; the use of artwork to anchor archaeological narratives in public outreach; and, the ...


Grand Challenge No. 4: Curriculum Design – Curriculum Matters: Case Studies From Canada And The Uk, John R. Welch, Michael Corbishley Sep 2020

Grand Challenge No. 4: Curriculum Design – Curriculum Matters: Case Studies From Canada And The Uk, John R. Welch, Michael Corbishley

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Archaeology in the 21st century faces outward more than inward, with many archaeologists working on projects that actively involve young people, descendant communities, diverse colleagues and clients, and the general public. The ways and means of learning and teaching about the past, as outlined in the curricula of primary, secondary, and post-secondary schools, always reflect the prevalent pedagogies of the age. Our paper comments upon two different ways of learning about archaeology. First, it presents an online university graduate program in Canada for post-Baccalaureate Cultural Resource Management (CRM) practitioners and a module on archaeology and education, which may form part ...


Grand Challenge No. 3: Digital Archaeology Technology-Enabled Learning In Archaeology, Meaghan M. Peuramaki-Brown, Shawn G. Morton, Oula Seitsonen, Chris Sims, Dave Blaine Sep 2020

Grand Challenge No. 3: Digital Archaeology Technology-Enabled Learning In Archaeology, Meaghan M. Peuramaki-Brown, Shawn G. Morton, Oula Seitsonen, Chris Sims, Dave Blaine

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Archaeology is traditionally a hands-on, in-person discipline when it comes to formal and informal instruction; however, more and more we are seeing the application of blended and online instruction and outreach implemented within our discipline. To this point, much of the movement in this direction has been related to a greater administrative emphasis on filling university classrooms, as well as the increasing importance of public outreach and engagement when it comes to presenting our research. More recently, we have all had to adjust our activities and interactions in reaction to physical distancing requirements during a pandemic. Whether in a physical ...


Grand Challenge No. 2: Experiential Learning Public Archaeology Internships And Partnerships: The Value Of Experiential Education, Cynthia Zutter, Christie Grekul Sep 2020

Grand Challenge No. 2: Experiential Learning Public Archaeology Internships And Partnerships: The Value Of Experiential Education, Cynthia Zutter, Christie Grekul

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Experiential education is a common part of undergraduate archaeology curricula, often provided in the form of lab and field courses. While these remain important elements, students are now looking for more applied forms of archaeological education that intertwine community needs with understanding the past. The following article outlines the steps taken to create an applied form of experiential education where MacEwan University students participate in an internship at a public archaeology center: Bodo Archaeological Interpretive Centre (BAIC) located in east central Alberta. In our case, students participate in the various tasks that archaeologists conduct, while at the same time serving ...


Grand Challenge No. 1: Truth And Reconciliation Archaeological Pedagogy, Indigenous Histories, And Reconciliation In Canada, Kisha Supernant Sep 2020

Grand Challenge No. 1: Truth And Reconciliation Archaeological Pedagogy, Indigenous Histories, And Reconciliation In Canada, Kisha Supernant

Journal of Archaeology and Education

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) released 94 Calls to Action, many of which pertain to education. Archaeological educators are called to find ways to integrate Indigenous knowledge into our classrooms, our teaching methods, and our curriculum at all levels of education. Across Canada, discussions are happening about how to decolonize and Indigenize curriculum, a process which will have significant implications for archaeological pedagogy. Drawing on both the specific text and the overall ethic of the TRC Calls to Action, I explore who teaches archaeology, what is taught, and what that means for archaeological pedagogy in ...


Introduction The ‘Other Grand Challenge’: Learning And Sharing In Archaeological Education And Pedagogy, Meaghan M. Peuramaki-Brown Sep 2020

Introduction The ‘Other Grand Challenge’: Learning And Sharing In Archaeological Education And Pedagogy, Meaghan M. Peuramaki-Brown

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This article serves as an introduction to a special issue titled "The ‘Other Grand Challenge’: Learning and Sharing in Archaeological Education and Pedagogy." In this introductory article, I briefly discuss the history of university-level archaeological education in Canada, primarily in light of considerations of accessibility and ethics. I then introduce the focus of the conference session I co-organized—dealing with grand challenges for the future of archaeological education and pedagogy, which forms the foundation for this special issue—inspired by a personal existential crisis and the intriguing role of stories and storytelling in archaeological education. The resources presented in this ...


Northeast Conference On Andean Archaeology And Ethnohistory (Ncaae) Statement On Sexual Harassment And Community Values, Monica Barnes, Richard L. Burger, Lucy Salazar, Lisa Deleonardis, David Fleming, Dan Sandweiss, Parker Vanvalkenburgh, Matthew Velasco Jun 2020

Northeast Conference On Andean Archaeology And Ethnohistory (Ncaae) Statement On Sexual Harassment And Community Values, Monica Barnes, Richard L. Burger, Lucy Salazar, Lisa Deleonardis, David Fleming, Dan Sandweiss, Parker Vanvalkenburgh, Matthew Velasco

Andean Past Special Publications

This is a statement on sexual harassment and community values signed by eight members of the Northeast Conference on Andean Archaeology and Ethnohistory (NCAAE)


Chronological Listing Of Papers Presented At The Northeast Conference On Andean Archaeology And Ethnohistory, First To Thirty-Eighth Meetings, Richard E. Daggett, Monica Barnes Jun 2020

Chronological Listing Of Papers Presented At The Northeast Conference On Andean Archaeology And Ethnohistory, First To Thirty-Eighth Meetings, Richard E. Daggett, Monica Barnes

Andean Past Special Publications

This is a chronological list of the papers presented at the Northeast Conference on Andean Archaeology and Ethnohistory from 1982 through 2019.


Prehistory Of The Ica-Nazca Littoral, Peru, Patrick Henry Carmichael, Alana Cordy-Collins May 2020

Prehistory Of The Ica-Nazca Littoral, Peru, Patrick Henry Carmichael, Alana Cordy-Collins

Andean Past Special Publications

Maritime resources played a significant economic role in the prehistoric coastal communities of Central and Northern Peru, and, prior to the current study, it was reasonable to assume they were equally important on the South Coast. In the 1980s, researchers postulated that the Nasca culture of the Early Intermediate Period was a state-level society based on inland agriculture, heavily augmented by aquatic foodstuffs gathered and processed at coastal settlements. Carmichael calls this the Nasca Maritime Hypothesis. It envisioned permanent, ocean front towns providing massive amounts of marine resources to inland centers, in exchange for agricultural produce. The research reported here ...


Life, Death And Burial Practices During The Inca Occupation Of Farfán On Peru's North Coast, Carol J. Mackey, Andrew J. Nelson May 2020

Life, Death And Burial Practices During The Inca Occupation Of Farfán On Peru's North Coast, Carol J. Mackey, Andrew J. Nelson

Andean Past Special Publications

This is a report on Inca burials excavated at the site of Farfán on Peru’s North Coast. Farfán was excavated by Carol J. Mackey from 1999 until 2004. Bioarchaeologist Andrew J. Nelson analyzed the human remains recovered. An important provincial center, Farfán was occupied successively by the Lambayeque, Chimu, and Inca cultures. This monograph postulates that female Inca burials at Farfán were those of aqlla, the “chosen women”, virgins who played important roles variously as weavers of fine cloth and brewers of chicha, as high status brides of important men, as religious officiants, and as the victims of human ...


Other Fish In The Sea: Black Sea Bass (Centropristis Striata) And Evidence For Past Environmental Change In The Archaeological Record, Brianna Ballard May 2020

Other Fish In The Sea: Black Sea Bass (Centropristis Striata) And Evidence For Past Environmental Change In The Archaeological Record, Brianna Ballard

Honors College

This research examines archaeological fish remains from the Gulf of Maine as indicators of past climate change. Archaeological research has shown that between ca. 5,000 and 3,800 years ago, swordfish were present in coastal Maine waters indicating warmer ocean temperatures. To date, little research has explored the presence of other warm water fish species in the Gulf of Maine at that time. In this study, I examine archaeological samples from the Waterside Shell Midden (44-7) in Sorrento, Maine to identify Black Sea Bass (Centropristis striata) within the site’s faunal collection. My work complements Sky Heller’s doctoral ...


Lessons Learned From Educational Research Of A National Science Foundation Research Experiences For Undergraduates, Carol E. Colaninno, John H. Chick, Matthew Feldmann Apr 2020

Lessons Learned From Educational Research Of A National Science Foundation Research Experiences For Undergraduates, Carol E. Colaninno, John H. Chick, Matthew Feldmann

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Participation in an archaeological field school is the entry point to a professional career in the discipline. Despite the importance of field schools, few scholars have investigated achieved student-learning outcomes or lasting impacts on students from participation in archaeological field research. We report on the educational design, learning objectives, and results of three years of formative and summative assessments for an interdisciplinary, archaeology and ecology research program for undergraduate students. Our learning objectives include promoting scientific literacy and communication, critical thinking and STEM skills, and capacities in archaeological and ecological interdisciplinarity. Using developed rubrics that account for both critical thinking ...


Teaching Archaeology With Inclusive Pedagogy, Maxine H. Oland Jan 2020

Teaching Archaeology With Inclusive Pedagogy, Maxine H. Oland

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Introductory archaeology courses are attractive general education offerings at many colleges and universities, and teach students about human diversity in the past and present. Yet many professors struggle to manage the tremendous diversity within the classroom. This article incorporates inclusive pedagogy models, particularly Universal Design for Learning and Teaching Across Cultural Strengths, to propose an inclusive model of education in archaeology classes. An emphasis is placed on large introductory lecture classes, where many students are exposed to academic archaeology for the first time.


The Realities Of Fieldwork: Embedding Professional Practice - A Case Study From Palaeoanthropology, Kris Kovarovic Nov 2019

The Realities Of Fieldwork: Embedding Professional Practice - A Case Study From Palaeoanthropology, Kris Kovarovic

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Programs in palaeoanthropology (the study of human evolution) do not often provide professional fieldwork training. Palaeoanthropology students are thus at risk of being unaware of the professional practices and responsibilities that come with a career in this subject area. Here I describe palaeoanthropology in the context of aligned field sciences, and make the case for requiring pre-fieldwork preparation through the implementation and evaluation of a seminar focusing on professional practice in palaeoanthropological fieldwork. The seminar was delivered to a small cohort of Masters of Science students at Durham University, UK. I qualitatively evaluate the seminar via semi-structured interviews, exploring how ...


The Need For Discipline-Based Education Research In Archaeology, Carol E. Colaninno Oct 2019

The Need For Discipline-Based Education Research In Archaeology, Carol E. Colaninno

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Over the last few decades, scholars have recognized the importance of discipline-based education research (DBER). As outlined by the National Research Council of the National Academies, DBER aims to 1) understand how students learn discipline concepts, practices, and ways of thinking; 2) understand how students develop expertise; 3) identify and measure learning objectives and forms of instruction that advance students towards those objectives; 4) contribute knowledge that can transform instruction; and 5) identify approaches to make education broad and inclusive. Physicists, chemists, engineers, biologists, astronomers, and geoscientists have been among the first to adopt DBER. Given research that demonstrates the ...


Mya Arenaria And Oxygen Isotopes: An Analysis To Suggest Season Of Occupation At Holmes Point East (62-6), Holmes Point West (62-8), And Joves Cove (44-13), Maine, Emily Blackwood Aug 2019

Mya Arenaria And Oxygen Isotopes: An Analysis To Suggest Season Of Occupation At Holmes Point East (62-6), Holmes Point West (62-8), And Joves Cove (44-13), Maine, Emily Blackwood

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The ratio of oxygen isotopes (ẟ18O) derived from archaeological bivalves can be used to suggest whether a site was occupied seasonally or year-round. To address the question of seasonality at three archaeological shell midden sites along the coast of Maine, modern samples of the soft-shelled clam, Mya arenaria, were collected from tidal mudflats associated with each site once a month for one year. An average of six modern shells per month were analyzed with their resulting ẟ18O values used to establish monthly ranges to which the archaeological samples of Mya arenaria were assigned; association of the archaeological shells to a ...


Teaching With Technology: Digital Tools For Archaeological Education, Caroline Gardiner Jul 2019

Teaching With Technology: Digital Tools For Archaeological Education, Caroline Gardiner

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Recent technological advances have greatly altered how scholars record, study, and educate the public about cultural resources. Data can now be instantly recorded, analyzed, and widely shared. Digital tools can help create multimedia, interactive products that have contributed greatly to education and outreach initiatives worldwide.

Both the National Park Service (NPS) and the National Council for Preservation Education (NCPE) are dedicated to studying, preserving, and educating the public about cultural resources. A recent internship project between these two institutions produced online lesson plans that educated students about cultural materials and the various methodologies scholars use to study them within archaeology ...


Service Learning In Archaeology And Its Impact On Perceptions Of Cultural Heritage And Historic Preservation, Kyle P. Freund, Laura K. Clark, Kevin Gidusko May 2019

Service Learning In Archaeology And Its Impact On Perceptions Of Cultural Heritage And Historic Preservation, Kyle P. Freund, Laura K. Clark, Kevin Gidusko

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This paper focuses on a for-credit cemetery recording class taught at Indian River State College (IRSC) and on the impact of the project on student perceptions of cultural heritage and historic preservation. One of the goals in creating this service learning course was to promote student awareness of the destructive risks that many historic cemeteries face and to impart the importance of stewardship over the archaeological record. To assess the effectiveness of the course in meeting this goal, a series of five interviews with students enrolled in the class were conducted to get participants to discuss their motivations and perceptions ...


The Alma College Archaeological Project: Toward A Community-Based Pedagogy, Kristin Landau Apr 2019

The Alma College Archaeological Project: Toward A Community-Based Pedagogy, Kristin Landau

Journal of Archaeology and Education

The turn toward community-based research in archaeology is “transforming” the discipline. No longer can we show up with screens and trowels wielding government permits and expect to start digging. Community-based archaeological projects may never even get to the excavation phase if local collaborators are uninterested or have other priorities. Now that collaboration with local populations has become standard archaeological practice, it is imperative to begin incorporating community engagement into traditional field schools. Today’s archaeology requires grassroots organizing, cultural awareness, and sensitive listening skills, in addition to digging square holes and drawing tree roots to scale. In this paper, I ...


Putting Archaeology And Anthropology Into Schools: A 2019 Update, Colleen P. Popson, Ruth O. Selig Mar 2019

Putting Archaeology And Anthropology Into Schools: A 2019 Update, Colleen P. Popson, Ruth O. Selig

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Our 2012 article, “Putting Anthropology Into Schools,” argued that integrating anthropology and archaeology into K-12 schools must involve teacher preparation, state certification requirements, and in-service training. National anthropology and archaeology organizations’ decades-long push for the integration of their disciplines into schools was outlined but assessed as relatively limited compared to successful efforts in psychology, sociology, and economics. Some progress did occur, traced primarily to the National Science Foundation and other funders, alongside committed individuals with well-developed curriculum materials. Our 2019 publication includes the original article followed by an UPDATE outlining developments since 2012. Reports from the National Academies and the ...


Archaeology In The Classroom At A New England Prep School, Ryan Wheeler Feb 2019

Archaeology In The Classroom At A New England Prep School, Ryan Wheeler

Journal of Archaeology and Education

In 1901 Robert S. Peabody lamented the lack of instruction in archaeology at his high school alma mater Phillips Academy, a prestigious New England boarding school. To rectify the situation, he used family funds and artifacts amassed by his personal curator Warren K. Moorehead to establish a Department of Archaeology at the school. A building was constructed and Moorehead and Peabody’s son, Charles, set about teaching classes. The pattern established by Moorehead and Peabody, however, was disrupted in 1914 when the school refocused the program exclusively on research. Classes were offered periodically over the next decades, and some students ...


Incorporating Field Excavations In Introduction To Archaeology, Rebecca M. Dean Feb 2019

Incorporating Field Excavations In Introduction To Archaeology, Rebecca M. Dean

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Most archaeology students first experience field work during a field school aimed at upper-division undergraduate majors. An excavation component in an Introduction to Archaeology class, however, can create an unequaled educational experience for students at all levels of experience and interest in archaeology. Excavations help students to master basic field methods, understand the nature of archaeological inference, recognize the strengths and limitations of archaeological data, grapple with archaeological ethics, and foster a sense of archaeological stewardship. This paper explores the outcomes of providing a field experience in the introductory class at the University of Minnesota Morris, the liberal arts campus ...


What College Students Learn From Teaching Others, Larkin N. Hood Dec 2018

What College Students Learn From Teaching Others, Larkin N. Hood

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This article describes what undergraduate students learned from participating in a museum docent program at a large, public university on the West Coast of the United States. The majority (93%) of students report an increase in their ability to effectively communicate specialized knowledge to museum visitors in one or more of the following ways: 1) identifying what visitors know and adjusting their explanations accordingly; 2) translating technical information to visitors; 3); communicating information in an active, hands-on manner; 4) confidently communicating their knowledge to others. Students reported personal and professional benefits as well. In addition to this focused observation approach ...


Key To The Past: Community Perceptions Of Yup’Ik Youth Interaction With Culturally Relevant Education Inspired By The Nunalleq Archaeology Project, Sean R. O'Rourke, Justin J. Turner, Krista Ritchie Nov 2018

Key To The Past: Community Perceptions Of Yup’Ik Youth Interaction With Culturally Relevant Education Inspired By The Nunalleq Archaeology Project, Sean R. O'Rourke, Justin J. Turner, Krista Ritchie

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This study qualitatively describes a) the implementation of culturally relevant education (CRE) programs for Yup’ik youth in Quinhagak, Alaska that developed from the Nunalleq Project—a nearby archaeological excavation—and b) community members’ and program facilitators’ perceptions of associated youth social and psychological outcomes. Ten semi-structured interviews (seven community members, three program facilitators) were undertaken and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Community members and program facilitators attributed numerous outcomes to the Nunalleq-related CRE, such as imparting practical skills (e.g., wilderness survival, artistic and technological skills), teaching young people to value their heritage (e.g., educating them about the ...


Say What?: Demystifying Discourse Analysis For Archaeology Students, Cynthia L. Van Gilder Jun 2018

Say What?: Demystifying Discourse Analysis For Archaeology Students, Cynthia L. Van Gilder

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Most archaeology instructors are eager to have their students appreciate that the study of the past is relevant to the present. In fact, most current introductory textbooks include a section, however brief it may be, on the socio-politics of archaeology. These discussions are usually framed around how ideas about the past have been used to justify abuse (e.g., Nazi archaeology to support an Aryan homeland), or how the involvement of descendant communities in research is now considered best practice in the field (e.g., NAGPRA, community based archaeology). One of the most powerful tools for understanding how what we ...


Utilizing Ground-Penetrating Radar In The Delineation And Cultural Resource Management Of Eroding Maine Coastal Shell Middens, Jacquelynn F. Miller May 2018

Utilizing Ground-Penetrating Radar In The Delineation And Cultural Resource Management Of Eroding Maine Coastal Shell Middens, Jacquelynn F. Miller

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Shell middens along the Maine coast archive up to 5000 years of cultural and climatic change, but the record is continually and rapidly lost to the sea through climate-driven coastal erosion and sea-level rise. These sites were constructed by the ancestors of Maine Tribes, and are composed of centimeters to meters of clam (Mya arenaria) and/or oyster (Crassostrea virginica) shells, other faunal remains, and cultural materials. Shell middens record human interaction with the environment and early coastal occupation and adaptation. The faunal remains reflect paleoenvironmental conditions and the distribution of extinct and extant forage-species along the western Gulf of ...


Digital Bridges Across Disciplinary, Practical And Pedagogical Divides: An Online Professional Master’S Program In Heritage Resource Management, John R. Welch, David V. Burley, Jonathan C. Driver, Erin A. Hogg, Kanthi Jayasundera, Michael Klassen, David Maxwell, George P. Nicholas, Janet Pivnick, Christopher D. Dore Feb 2018

Digital Bridges Across Disciplinary, Practical And Pedagogical Divides: An Online Professional Master’S Program In Heritage Resource Management, John R. Welch, David V. Burley, Jonathan C. Driver, Erin A. Hogg, Kanthi Jayasundera, Michael Klassen, David Maxwell, George P. Nicholas, Janet Pivnick, Christopher D. Dore

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Growth and diversification in heritage resource management (HRM) archaeology since the 1960s have created new demands for training the next generations of HRM leaders and for addressing persistent and counterproductive divisions between academic and applied archaeologies. The Simon Fraser University Department of Archaeology (SFU) has responded to these demands with an all-new, cohort-based, thesis-focused graduate program created by and for HRM professionals. The program’s target audience is HRM practitioners who hold Bachelor’s credentials, have initiated promising careers in HRM, and desire advanced, research-focused degrees to enable their professional capacity and upward mobility. The SFU program is structured and ...


Teaching Bones From My Garden, John C. Whittaker Jan 2018

Teaching Bones From My Garden, John C. Whittaker

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Abstract

Faunal analysis, or zooarchaeology, is an important subfield that provides information on human ecology, economy, culture, and society. Few of my students have much experience with hunting, farming, anatomy, or even eating meat these days, so faunal analysis labs in an Archaeological Field Methods class present some difficulties.

Faunal assemblages from archaeological sites are often small, fragile, and too valuable for class use. They require good comparative collections, and it may be difficult for students to relate to unfamiliar animals and cultures.

These problems can be overcome by producing a faunal teaching assemblage from home meat consumption. For over ...


Department Of Anthropology (University Of Maine) Records, 1962-2006, Special Collections, Raymond H. Fogler Library, University Of Maine Jan 2018

Department Of Anthropology (University Of Maine) Records, 1962-2006, Special Collections, Raymond H. Fogler Library, University Of Maine

Finding Aids

Records in this collection are mainly textual information and photographic material created by Professor Alaric Faulkner and his survey teams. The record group also includes cartographic material, cassette tapes, and some computer discs and audio visual material.

The record series Administrative Records includes material related to the administration of the University of Maine's Department of Anthropology, includes a proposal for a graduate study in historical archaeology, details of Faulkner's appointment as Historical Archaeologist at the University of Maine in 1978, and a report by Faulkner on his activities from 1984-1985.

Alaric Faulkner was born January 12, 1945, in ...