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Physics Faculty Publications and Presentations

1986

Plasma and Beam Physics

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Physics

Fabrication Of Bipolar Transistors By Maskless Ion Implantation, Robert H. Reuss, Damon Morgan, Ann Goldenetz, William M. Clark, David B. Rensch, Mark Utlaut Jan 1986

Fabrication Of Bipolar Transistors By Maskless Ion Implantation, Robert H. Reuss, Damon Morgan, Ann Goldenetz, William M. Clark, David B. Rensch, Mark Utlaut

Physics Faculty Publications and Presentations

The first focused ion beam (FIB) arsenic ion implants are reported. A shallow junction, vertical npn bipolar transistor fabricated by maskless implantation of B and As is described. For comparison, devices on the same wafer were also processed with conventional, broad‐beam B and/or As implants. Good transistor performance is obtained for each type of implanted transistor. Device characteristics for FIB and conventional implants are generally the same. However, initial results indicate that diode quality and junction leakage appear somewhat degraded (excess generation–recombination) for FIB arsenic implanted devices. Characteristics of FIB boron implanted devices obtained over an extended ...


The Focused Ion Beam As An Integrated Circuit Restructuring Tool, J. Melngailis, C. R. Musil, E. H. Stevens, Mark Utlaut, E. M. Kellogg, R. T. Post, M. W. Geis, R. W. Mountain Jan 1986

The Focused Ion Beam As An Integrated Circuit Restructuring Tool, J. Melngailis, C. R. Musil, E. H. Stevens, Mark Utlaut, E. M. Kellogg, R. T. Post, M. W. Geis, R. W. Mountain

Physics Faculty Publications and Presentations

One of the capabilities of focused ion beam systems is ion milling. The purpose of this work is to explore this capability as a tool for integrated circuit restructuring. Methods for cutting and joining conductors are needed. Two methods for joining conductors are demonstrated. The first consists of spinning nitrocellulose (a self‐developing resist) on the circuit, ion exposing an area, say, 7×7 μm, then milling a smaller via with sloping sidewalls through the first metal layer down to the second, e‐beam evaporating metal, and then dissolving the nitrocellulose to achieve liftoff. The resistance of these links between ...