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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Physics

Effect Of Substrate Composition And Alignment On Corneal Cell Phenotype, Donna Phu '09, Lindsay S. Wray '08, Robert V. Warren '10, Richard C. Haskell, Elizabeth J. Orwin Jan 2011

Effect Of Substrate Composition And Alignment On Corneal Cell Phenotype, Donna Phu '09, Lindsay S. Wray '08, Robert V. Warren '10, Richard C. Haskell, Elizabeth J. Orwin

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Corneal blindness is a significant problem treated primarily by corneal transplants. Donor tissue supply is low, creating a growing need for an alternative. A tissue-engineered cornea made from patient-derived cells and biopolymer scaffold materials would be widely accessible to all patients and would alleviate the need for donor sources. Previous work in this lab led to a method for electrospinning type I collagen scaffolds for culturing corneal fibroblasts ex vivo that mimics the microenvironment in the native cornea. This electrospun scaffold is composed of small-diameter, aligned collagen fibers. In this study, we investigate the effect of scaffold nanostructure and composition ...


Kinematic Evidence For Superfast Locomotory Muscle In Two Species Of Teneriffiid Mites, Grace C. Wu, Jonathan C. Wright, Dwight L. Whitaker, Anna N. Ahn Aug 2010

Kinematic Evidence For Superfast Locomotory Muscle In Two Species Of Teneriffiid Mites, Grace C. Wu, Jonathan C. Wright, Dwight L. Whitaker, Anna N. Ahn

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Locomotory muscles typically operate over a narrow range of contraction frequencies, characterized by the predominant fiber types and functional roles. The highest documented frequencies in the synchronous sound-producing muscles of insects (550 Hz) and toadfish (200 Hz) far exceed the contraction frequencies observed in weight-bearing locomotory muscles, which have maximum documented frequencies below 15-30 Hz. Laws of scaling, however, predict that smaller arthropods may employ stride frequencies exceeding this range. In this study we measured running speed and stride frequency in two undescribed species of teneriffiid mites from the coastal sage scrub of southern California. Relative speeds of both species ...


Thermal Links For The Implementation Of An Optical Refrigerator, John Parker, David Mar, Steven Von Der Porten, John Hankinson, Kevin Byram, Chris Lee, Michael K. Mayeda, Richard C. Haskell, Qimin Yang, Scott R. Greenfield, Richard I. Epstein Jan 2009

Thermal Links For The Implementation Of An Optical Refrigerator, John Parker, David Mar, Steven Von Der Porten, John Hankinson, Kevin Byram, Chris Lee, Michael K. Mayeda, Richard C. Haskell, Qimin Yang, Scott R. Greenfield, Richard I. Epstein

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Optical refrigeration has been demonstrated by several groups of researchers, but the cooling elements have not been thermally linked to realistic heat loads in ways that achieve the desired temperatures. The ideal thermal link will have minimal surface area, provide complete optical isolation for the load, and possess high thermal conductivity. We have designed thermal links that minimize the absorption of fluoresced photons by the heat load using multiple mirrors and geometric shapes including a hemisphere, a kinked waveguide, and a tapered waveguide. While total link performance is dependent on additional factors, we have observed net transmission of photons with ...


Motion-Sensitive 3-D Optical Coherence Microscope Operating At 1300 Nm For The Visualization Of Early Frog Development, Barbara M. Hoeling, Stephanie S. Feldman, Daniel T. Strenge, Aaron Bernard, Emily R. Hogan, Daniel C. Petersen, Scott E. Fraser, Yun Kee, J. Michael Tyszka, Richard C. Haskell Jan 2007

Motion-Sensitive 3-D Optical Coherence Microscope Operating At 1300 Nm For The Visualization Of Early Frog Development, Barbara M. Hoeling, Stephanie S. Feldman, Daniel T. Strenge, Aaron Bernard, Emily R. Hogan, Daniel C. Petersen, Scott E. Fraser, Yun Kee, J. Michael Tyszka, Richard C. Haskell

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We present 3-dimensional volume-rendered in vivo images of developing embryos of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis taken with our new en-face-scanning, focus-tracking OCM system at 1300 nm wavelength. Compared to our older instrument which operates at 850 nm, we measure a decrease in the attenuation coefficient by 33%, leading to a substantial improvement in depth penetration. Both instruments have motion-sensitivity capability. By evaluating the fast Fourier transform of the fringe signal, we can produce simultaneously images displaying the fringe amplitude of the backscattered light and images showing the random Brownian motion of the scatterers. We present time-lapse movies of ...


Immunogold Labeling To Enhance Contrast In Optical Coherence Microscopy Of Tissue Engineered Corneal Constructs, Chris B. Raub, Elizabeth J. Orwin, Richard C. Haskell Sep 2004

Immunogold Labeling To Enhance Contrast In Optical Coherence Microscopy Of Tissue Engineered Corneal Constructs, Chris B. Raub, Elizabeth J. Orwin, Richard C. Haskell

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Our lab has used an optical coherence microscope (OCM) to assess both the structure of tissue-engineered corneal constructs and their transparency. Currently, we are not able to resolve cells versus collagen matrix material in the images produced. We would like to distinguish cells in order to determine if they are viable while growing in culture and also if they are significantly contributing to the light scattering in the tissue. In order to do this, we are currently investigating the use of immunogold labeling. Gold nanoparticles are high scatterers and can create contrast in images. We have conjugated gold nanoparticles to ...


Visualizing Early Frog Development With Motion-Sensitive 3-D Optical Coherence Microscopy, Richard C. Haskell, Mary E. Williams, Daniel C. Petersen, Barbara M. Hoeling, Andrew J. Schile, J. D. Pennington, M. G. Seetin, J. M. Castelaz, Scott E. Fraser, Cyrus Papan, Hongwu Ren, Johannes F. De Boer, Zhongping Chen Sep 2004

Visualizing Early Frog Development With Motion-Sensitive 3-D Optical Coherence Microscopy, Richard C. Haskell, Mary E. Williams, Daniel C. Petersen, Barbara M. Hoeling, Andrew J. Schile, J. D. Pennington, M. G. Seetin, J. M. Castelaz, Scott E. Fraser, Cyrus Papan, Hongwu Ren, Johannes F. De Boer, Zhongping Chen

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A motion-sensitive en-face-scanning 3-D optical coherence microscope (OCM) has been designed and constructed to study critical events in the early development of plants and animals. We describe the OCM instrument and present time-lapse movies of frog gastrulation, an early developmental event in which three distinct tissue layers are established that later give rise to all major organ systems. OCM images constructed with fringe-amplitude data show the mesendoderm migrating up along the blastocoel roof, thus forming the inner two tissue layers. Motion-sigma data, measuring the random motion of scatterers, is used to construct complementary images that indicate the presence of Brownian ...


A High-Bandwidth Frequency-Domain Photon Migration Instrument For Clinical Use, Steen J. Madsen, Eric R. Anderson, Richard C. Haskell, Bruce J. Tromberg May 1995

A High-Bandwidth Frequency-Domain Photon Migration Instrument For Clinical Use, Steen J. Madsen, Eric R. Anderson, Richard C. Haskell, Bruce J. Tromberg

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We have developed a high-bandwidth frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) instrument which is capable of noninvasively determining the optical properties of biological tissues in near-real-time. This portable, inexpensive, diode-based instrument is unique in the sense that we employ direct diode laser modulation and avalanche photodiode detection. Diffusion models were used to extract the optical properties (absorption and transport scattering coefficients)of tissue-simulating solutions.from the 300 kHz to I GHz photon density wave data.