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Biological and Chemical Physics

University of Richmond

Mechanical properties

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Physics

A Modular Fibrinogen Model That Captures The Stress-Strain Behavior Of Fibrin Fibers, Rodney D. Averett, Bryant Menn, Eric H. Lee, Christine C. Helms, Thomas Barker, Martin Guthold Oct 2012

A Modular Fibrinogen Model That Captures The Stress-Strain Behavior Of Fibrin Fibers, Rodney D. Averett, Bryant Menn, Eric H. Lee, Christine C. Helms, Thomas Barker, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

We tested what to our knowledge is a new computational model for fibrin fiber mechanical behavior. The model is composed of three distinct elements: the folded fibrinogen core as seen in the crystal structure, the unstructured α-C connector, and the partially folded α-C domain. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of all three regions and how they may contribute to fibrin fiber stress-strain behavior. Yet no molecular model has been computationally tested that takes into account the individual contributions of all these regions. Constant velocity, steered molecular dynamics studies at 0.025 Å/ps were conducted on the ...


The Mechanical Stress–Strain Properties Of Single Electrospun Collagen Type I Nanofibers, Christine C. Helms, Corentin Coulais, Martin Guthold Aug 2010

The Mechanical Stress–Strain Properties Of Single Electrospun Collagen Type I Nanofibers, Christine C. Helms, Corentin Coulais, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

Knowledge of the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers is important for their successful application in tissue engineering, material composites, filtration and drug delivery. In particular, electrospun collagen has great potential for biomedical applications due to its biocompatibility and promotion of cell growth and adhesion. Using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/optical microscopy technique, the single fiber mechanical properties of dry, electrospun collagen type I were determined. The fibers were electrospun from a 80 mg ml−1 collagen solution in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluro-2-propanol and collected on a striated surface suitable for lateral force manipulation by AFM. The ...


The Mechanical Properties Of Single Fibrin Fibers, W. Liu, Christine C. Helms, E. A. Sparks, Martin Guthold May 2010

The Mechanical Properties Of Single Fibrin Fibers, W. Liu, Christine C. Helms, E. A. Sparks, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

Background:

Blood clots perform the mechanical task of stemming the flow of blood.

Objectives:

To advance understanding and realistic modeling of blood clot behavior we determined the mechanical properties of the major structural component of blood clots, fibrin fibers.

Methods:

We used a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/fluorescence microscopy technique to determine key mechanical properties of single crosslinked and uncrosslinked fibrin fibers.

Results and conclusions:

Overall, full crosslinking renders fibers less extensible, stiffer, and less elastic than their uncrosslinked counterparts. All fibers showed stress relaxation behavior (time-dependent weakening) with a fast and a slow relaxation time, 2 and 52 ...


The Mechanical Properties Of Individual, Electrospun Fibrinogen Fibers, Christine C. Helms, Corentin Coulais, Manoj Namboothiry, David L. Carroll, Roy R. Hantgan, Martin Guthold Feb 2009

The Mechanical Properties Of Individual, Electrospun Fibrinogen Fibers, Christine C. Helms, Corentin Coulais, Manoj Namboothiry, David L. Carroll, Roy R. Hantgan, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

We used a combined atomic force microscope (AFM)/fluorescence microscope technique to study the mechanical properties of individual, electrospun fibrinogen fibers in aqueous buffer. Fibers (average diameter 208 nm) were suspended over 12 μm-wide grooves in a striated, transparent substrate. The AFM, situated above the sample, was used to laterally stretch the fibers and to measure the applied force. The fluorescence microscope, situated below the sample, was used to visualize the stretching process. The fibers could be stretched to 2.3 times their original length before breaking; the breaking stress was 22·106 Pa. We collected incremental stress-strain curves ...