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Biological and Chemical Physics

University of Richmond

Blood clots

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Physics

A Modular Fibrinogen Model That Captures The Stress-Strain Behavior Of Fibrin Fibers, Rodney D. Averett, Bryant Menn, Eric H. Lee, Christine C. Helms, Thomas Barker, Martin Guthold Oct 2012

A Modular Fibrinogen Model That Captures The Stress-Strain Behavior Of Fibrin Fibers, Rodney D. Averett, Bryant Menn, Eric H. Lee, Christine C. Helms, Thomas Barker, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

We tested what to our knowledge is a new computational model for fibrin fiber mechanical behavior. The model is composed of three distinct elements: the folded fibrinogen core as seen in the crystal structure, the unstructured α-C connector, and the partially folded α-C domain. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of all three regions and how they may contribute to fibrin fiber stress-strain behavior. Yet no molecular model has been computationally tested that takes into account the individual contributions of all these regions. Constant velocity, steered molecular dynamics studies at 0.025 Å/ps were conducted on the ...


Α−Α Cross-Links Increase Fibrin Fiber Elasticity And Stiffness, Christine C. Helms, Robert A.S. Ariens, S. Uitte De Willige, Kristina F. Standeven, Martin Guthold Jan 2012

Α−Α Cross-Links Increase Fibrin Fiber Elasticity And Stiffness, Christine C. Helms, Robert A.S. Ariens, S. Uitte De Willige, Kristina F. Standeven, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

Fibrin fibers, which are ∼100 nm in diameter, are the major structural component of a blood clot. The mechanical properties of single fibrin fibers determine the behavior of a blood clot and, thus, have a critical influence on heart attacks, strokes, and embolisms. Cross-linking is thought to fortify blood clots; though, the role of αα cross-links in fibrin fiber assembly and their effect on the mechanical properties of single fibrin fibers are poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we used a combined fluorescence and atomic force microscope technique to determine the stiffness (modulus), extensibility, and elasticity of individual ...