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Biological and Chemical Physics

University of Richmond

2010

Mechanical properties

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Physics

The Mechanical Stress–Strain Properties Of Single Electrospun Collagen Type I Nanofibers, Christine C. Helms, Corentin Coulais, Martin Guthold Aug 2010

The Mechanical Stress–Strain Properties Of Single Electrospun Collagen Type I Nanofibers, Christine C. Helms, Corentin Coulais, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

Knowledge of the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers is important for their successful application in tissue engineering, material composites, filtration and drug delivery. In particular, electrospun collagen has great potential for biomedical applications due to its biocompatibility and promotion of cell growth and adhesion. Using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/optical microscopy technique, the single fiber mechanical properties of dry, electrospun collagen type I were determined. The fibers were electrospun from a 80 mg ml−1 collagen solution in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluro-2-propanol and collected on a striated surface suitable for lateral force manipulation by AFM. The ...


The Mechanical Properties Of Single Fibrin Fibers, W. Liu, Christine C. Helms, E. A. Sparks, Martin Guthold May 2010

The Mechanical Properties Of Single Fibrin Fibers, W. Liu, Christine C. Helms, E. A. Sparks, Martin Guthold

Physics Faculty Publications

Background:

Blood clots perform the mechanical task of stemming the flow of blood.

Objectives:

To advance understanding and realistic modeling of blood clot behavior we determined the mechanical properties of the major structural component of blood clots, fibrin fibers.

Methods:

We used a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/fluorescence microscopy technique to determine key mechanical properties of single crosslinked and uncrosslinked fibrin fibers.

Results and conclusions:

Overall, full crosslinking renders fibers less extensible, stiffer, and less elastic than their uncrosslinked counterparts. All fibers showed stress relaxation behavior (time-dependent weakening) with a fast and a slow relaxation time, 2 and 52 ...