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Full-Text Articles in Physics

Simultaneous Rayleigh-Scatter And Sodium Resonance Lidar Temperature Comparisons In The Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Tao Yuan, Neal R. Criddle Aug 2018

Simultaneous Rayleigh-Scatter And Sodium Resonance Lidar Temperature Comparisons In The Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Tao Yuan, Neal R. Criddle

All Physics Faculty Publications

The Utah State University (USU) campus (41.7°N, 111.8°W) hosts a unique upper atmospheric observatory that houses both a high-power, large-aperture Rayleigh lidar and a Na lidar. For the first time, we will present 19 nights of coordinated temperature measurements from the two lidars, overlapping in the 80–110 km observational range, over one annual cycle (summer 2014 to summer 2015). This overlap has been achieved through upgrades to the existing USU Rayleigh lidar that increased its observational altitude from 45–95 to 70–115 km and by relocating the Colorado State Na lidar to the USU ...


Extremely Sensitive Rayleigh-Scatter Lidar At Usu, Vincent B. Wickwar, Leda Sox, David Barton, Matthew T. Emerick Jun 2014

Extremely Sensitive Rayleigh-Scatter Lidar At Usu, Vincent B. Wickwar, Leda Sox, David Barton, Matthew T. Emerick

Posters

Rayleigh lidar opened a portion of the atmosphere, from 30 to 90 km, to ground-based observations. Rayleigh-scatter observations were made at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (ALO) at Utah State University (USU) from 1993–2004 between 45 and 90 km, creating a very dense data set consisting of ~5000 hours of observations carried out over ~900 nights. The lidar had a mirror of area 0.15 m2 and a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm at 30 Hz at ~21 W, giving a power-aperture product (PAP) of ~3.1 Wm2.


Interpretation (Or Is It Calibration?) Of Rayleigh-Scatter Lidar Signals, Vincent B. Wickwar, Leda Sox Jun 2014

Interpretation (Or Is It Calibration?) Of Rayleigh-Scatter Lidar Signals, Vincent B. Wickwar, Leda Sox

Presentations

No abstract provided.


Rayleigh Lidar Observations Of The Mid-Latitude Mesosphere During Stratospheric Warming Events And A New Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar At Usu, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Chad Fish, Joshua P. Herron, Matthew T. Emerick Sep 2013

Rayleigh Lidar Observations Of The Mid-Latitude Mesosphere During Stratospheric Warming Events And A New Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar At Usu, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Chad Fish, Joshua P. Herron, Matthew T. Emerick

Presentations

No abstract provided.


Multi-Year Observations Of Mid-Latitude Middle Atmospheric Winds, Waves, And Temperature Associated With Ssw Events Over Northern Utah, Chad Fish, Vincent B. Wickwar, B. Thurairajah, Jan J. Sojka, F. T. Berkey, S. Bailey, Titus Yuan, Michael J. Taylor, N. Mitchell, W. Hocking Aug 2013

Multi-Year Observations Of Mid-Latitude Middle Atmospheric Winds, Waves, And Temperature Associated With Ssw Events Over Northern Utah, Chad Fish, Vincent B. Wickwar, B. Thurairajah, Jan J. Sojka, F. T. Berkey, S. Bailey, Titus Yuan, Michael J. Taylor, N. Mitchell, W. Hocking

Presentations

We investigate the behavior of 14 years of wind, wave, and temperature observations in the middle atmosphere over northeastern Utah, USA during periods of sudden stratospheric warming events. This systematic review of the impacts of sudden stratospheric warming events on the middle atmosphere at a northern mid-latitude site is conducted using ground based measurements from imaging Doppler interferometry and meteor wind radar and Na and Raleigh lidar and space based measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry sensor onboard the NASA sponsored Thermosphere Ionosphere mesosphere Energetics Dynamics Mission.


Rayleigh Lidar Temperature Studies In The Upper Mesosphere And Lower Thermosphere, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, Matthew T. Emerick Jun 2013

Rayleigh Lidar Temperature Studies In The Upper Mesosphere And Lower Thermosphere, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, Matthew T. Emerick

Posters

Rayleigh lidar technology opened the middle atmosphere (from 30–90 km) to ground-based observations. The upgraded system at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (ALO) on the campus of Utah State University (41.74, 111.81) has shown that these ground-based observations can be extended to 109 km, with the goal of reaching 120 km. The resultant study of short and long-term temperature trends, using Rayleigh lidar, contributes immensely to the overall understanding of the properties and dominant physical processes in the middle atmosphere and Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region. Temperature variations on short time scales, from minutes to days, give insight into ...


First Temperature Observations With The Usu Very Large Rayleigh Lidar: An Examination Of Mesopause Temperatures, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, Marcus J. Bingham, Lance W. Petersen, Matthew T. Emerick Dec 2012

First Temperature Observations With The Usu Very Large Rayleigh Lidar: An Examination Of Mesopause Temperatures, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, Marcus J. Bingham, Lance W. Petersen, Matthew T. Emerick

Posters

As the impetus for extended observational measurements throughout the middle atmosphere has increased1 , the limits of previous instrumentation need to be pushed. The Rayleigh lidar group at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (ALO) at Utah State University has pushed such limits on existing Rayleigh scatter lidar technology and, through major upgrades to the previous lidar system, has been able to gather temperature measurements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere from approximately 70P109 km. A data campaign with the new system was conducted around the annual temperature minimum, centered on late June 2012, in this region. The temperatures from this campaign ...


Upgraded Alo Rayleigh Lidar System And Its Improved Gravity Wave Measurements, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, Marcus J. Bingham Jun 2012

Upgraded Alo Rayleigh Lidar System And Its Improved Gravity Wave Measurements, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, Marcus J. Bingham

Graduate Student Posters

The Rayleigh-Scatter lidar system at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (ALO) on the Utah State campus is currently going through a series of upgrades to significantly improve its observational abilities. A specific objective of these upgrades is to expand the altitude range over which backscattered photons can be collected. A second objective is to increase the sensitivity of the instrument to be able to analyze the raw data at finer temporal and/or spatial resolutions. By measuring relative densities, the system will be able to produce absolute temperatures and relative density perturbations, which illustrate gravity wave structures. Gravity wave studies will ...


Lidar User’S Manual, Lance William Peterson May 2011

Lidar User’S Manual, Lance William Peterson

Undergraduate Honors Capstone Projects

This is intended to be a user’s manual for the upgraded USU Rayleigh lidar. As such, it begins with a discussion of the purpose of a lidar. This is followed by a brief explanation of the fundamentals of Rayleigh scatter lidar. Next the reasons for and benefits of upgrading the lidar are discussed and as well as how the upgrade was accomplished. After establishing this basis, instructions are provided for operating the lidar, performing basic maintenance, and aligning various components.


Early Observations Of The Middle Atmosphere Above Usu With The World’S Most Sensitive Lidar, Lance W. Petersen, Marcus J. Bingham, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron Apr 2011

Early Observations Of The Middle Atmosphere Above Usu With The World’S Most Sensitive Lidar, Lance W. Petersen, Marcus J. Bingham, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron

Posters

Extensive measurements have been made of the upper atmosphere by satellites and the lower atmosphere is measured twice daily by weather balloons. In contrast, the middle atmosphere is a difficult area to measure and therefore has been much less extensively studied. We are currently upgrading an old lidar system to a new system that will be 70 times more sensitive, making this the most sensitive lidar of its kind in the world. The upgrade consists of combining the outputs of 18 and 24 watt Nd:YAG lasers; implementing an optical chain to detect backscattered light using an existing large, four-mirror ...


Rayleigh-Lidar Observations Of Mesospheric Instabilities, Gabriel C. Taylor, Durga N. Kafle, Vincent B. Wickwar Apr 2009

Rayleigh-Lidar Observations Of Mesospheric Instabilities, Gabriel C. Taylor, Durga N. Kafle, Vincent B. Wickwar

Posters

From 1993 to 2004 the Utah State University Rayleigh lidar, known as the USU green laser, collected 900 nights of data from the mesosphere (45-90 km). From these observations profiles of relative neutral densities and absolute temperatures were derived. Usually, the atmosphere is horizontally stratified with a balance between gravitational and pressure forces. When this balance is perturbed, it leads to the generation of buoyancy or “gravity” waves. An example of these is clear air turbulence, which can have dramatic effects on airplanes. As these waves propagate upward, the decrease in atmospheric density and conservation of energy combine to give ...


The Effects Of Large Data Gaps On Estimating Linear Trend In Autocorrelated Data, Troy A. Wynn, Vincent B. Wickwar May 2007

The Effects Of Large Data Gaps On Estimating Linear Trend In Autocorrelated Data, Troy A. Wynn, Vincent B. Wickwar

Conference publications

It is well known that atmospheric data is autocorrelated. Techniques for fitting a model to autocorrelated data without data gaps are well known. However in cases where large data gaps exist the analysis ins more challenging. By large data gaps we mean 16-24% of the possible data present. This paper explores the challenges of estimating the correlation coefficient in an autocorrelated data set containing large data gaps and suggests ways to accurately estimate the autocorrelation and linear trend in a signal when such cases arise.


Observations Of A Noctilucent Cloud Above Logan, Utah (41.7°N, 111.8°W) In 1995, J P. Herron, Vincent B. Wickwar, P J. Espy, J W. Merriwether Jan 2007

Observations Of A Noctilucent Cloud Above Logan, Utah (41.7°N, 111.8°W) In 1995, J P. Herron, Vincent B. Wickwar, P J. Espy, J W. Merriwether

All Physics Faculty Publications

A Rayleigh-scatter lidar has been operated at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (ALO) on the Utah State University (USU) campus (41.7°N, 111.8°W) since August 1993. During the morning of 22 June 1995, lidar returns from a noctilucent cloud (NLC) were observed for approximately 1 hr, well away from the twilight periods when NLCs are visible. This detection of an NLC at this latitude shows that the first reported sighting, in 1999 (Wickwar et al., 2002), was not a unique occurrence. This 1995 observation differs from the 1999 one in that temperatures could be deduced. Near the 83-km ...


Comparisons Of Long-Term Trends And Variability In The Middle Atmosphere, Troy Wynn, Joshua P. Herron, Vincent B. Wickwar Dec 2004

Comparisons Of Long-Term Trends And Variability In The Middle Atmosphere, Troy Wynn, Joshua P. Herron, Vincent B. Wickwar

Posters

The USU Rayleigh Lidar (41.74°N 111.81°W) has been regularly used to measure temperatures in the middle atmosphere from 45 to 90 km. It is well suited for nightly observation; provides excellent vertical temperature resolution; and does not need external calibration. It began operation in August 1993 and a dataset spanning more than ten years has been collected. The analysis here includes 593 nightly temperature profiles from September 1993 through July 2003.

With many sources of variation in the atmosphere, all temperature effects cannot be easily detected. The largest source of temperature variation, and the easiest to ...


Rayleigh-Lidar Observations Of Mesospheric Mid-Latitude Density Climatology Above Utah State University, Eric M. Lundell, Vincent B. Wickwar Dec 2004

Rayleigh-Lidar Observations Of Mesospheric Mid-Latitude Density Climatology Above Utah State University, Eric M. Lundell, Vincent B. Wickwar

Posters

Data from Rayleigh lidars have been used extensively to derive temperatures in the mesospheric region of the atmosphere. However, these data have not been used extensively in a similar way to derive neutral densities. We report on one such mid-latitude, density climatology between 45 and ~90 km, based on nearly 600 good nights of observations carried out since 1993 at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (ALO) at Utah State University (41.7°N 111.8°W). They produce relative density profiles that are then normalized at 45 km to an empirical model, in this case the MSISe00 model. Despite this normalization ...


Comparisons Of Long-Term Trends And Variability In The Middle Atmosphere, Troy Wynn, Joshua P. Herron, Vincent B. Wickwar Jul 2004

Comparisons Of Long-Term Trends And Variability In The Middle Atmosphere, Troy Wynn, Joshua P. Herron, Vincent B. Wickwar

Posters

Rayleigh Lidar is routinely used to measure temperatures in the middle atmosphere from 45 to 90 km. It is well adapted for nightly observation, provides excellent vertical temperature resolution, and does not need external calibration. The USU Rayleigh Lidar (41.74°N 111.81°W) dataset spans more than ten years from September 1993 to July 2003 with 62 monthly profiles (about 5 years of data) spread over that period.

With many sources of variation in the atmosphere, all temperature effects cannot be detected. The largest source, and the easiest to measure, is the seasonal variation. In addition there are ...


Lidar Investigations Of The Middle Atmosphere Or What Is The Middle Atmosphere, What Is The Green Beam, And What Is The Red Beam?, Vincent B. Wickwar Jan 2003

Lidar Investigations Of The Middle Atmosphere Or What Is The Middle Atmosphere, What Is The Green Beam, And What Is The Red Beam?, Vincent B. Wickwar

Presentations

No abstract provided.