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Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

Ferromagnetism

Latika Menon

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Full-Text Articles in Physics

Possible Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism In Hydrogenated Carbon Nanotubes, Adam Friedman, Hyunkyung Chun, Yung Joon Jung, Don Heiman, Evan Glaser, Latika Menon Oct 2012

Possible Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism In Hydrogenated Carbon Nanotubes, Adam Friedman, Hyunkyung Chun, Yung Joon Jung, Don Heiman, Evan Glaser, Latika Menon

Latika Menon

We find that ferromagnetism can be induced in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by introducing hydrogen. Multiwalled CNTs grown inside porous alumina templates contain a large density of defects resulting in significant hydrogen uptake when annealed at high temperatures. This hydrogen incorporation produces H-complex and adatom magnetism which generates a sizable ferromagnetic moment and a Curie temperature near TC=1000  K. We studied the conditions for the incorporation of hydrogen, the temperature-dependent magnetic behavior, and the dependence of the ferromagnetism on the size of the nanotubes.


Investigation Of Electrical Transport In Hydrogenated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes, Adam Friedman, Hyunkyung Chun, Don Heiman, Yung Jung, Latika Menon Jun 2011

Investigation Of Electrical Transport In Hydrogenated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes, Adam Friedman, Hyunkyung Chun, Don Heiman, Yung Jung, Latika Menon

Latika Menon

Highly disordered multiwalled carbon nanotubes of large outer diameter (~60 nm) fabricated by means of chemical vapor deposition process inside porous alumina templates exhibit ferromagnetism when annealed in a H2/Ar atmosphere. In the presence of an applied magnetic field, there is a transition from positive to negative magnetoresistance. The transition may be explained in terms of the Bright model for ordered and disordered carbon structures. Additionally, temperature dependent electrical transport experiments exhibit a zero-bias anomaly at low temperature.