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Incorporating Sea Level Change Scenarios Into Norfolk Harbor Channels Deepening And Elizabeth River Southern Branch Navigation Improvements Study : Final Report On The “Hydrodynamic Modeling”, Zhuo Liu, Harry V. Wang, Yinglong J. Zhang, Fei Ye Sep 2017

Incorporating Sea Level Change Scenarios Into Norfolk Harbor Channels Deepening And Elizabeth River Southern Branch Navigation Improvements Study : Final Report On The “Hydrodynamic Modeling”, Zhuo Liu, Harry V. Wang, Yinglong J. Zhang, Fei Ye

Reports

The Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) team has applied a 3D unstructured-grid hydrodynamic model SCHISM in the study of the impact of channel dredging on hydrodynamics in the lower Chesapeake Bay project area. This report is a companion report to that of Zhang et al. (2017; doi:10.21220/V5MF0F) and focuses on the impact of channel dredging specifically under the projected future sea-level change (SLC) of 1 meter rise by 2100. This is an average of the high end of semi-empirical, global sea-level rise (SLR) projections adopted by the Virginia Port Authority (VPA) and the Army Corps of ...


Incorporation Of Sea Level Change Scenarios Into Norfolk Harbor And Channels Deepening Study & Elizabeth River Southern Branch Navigation Improvements Study : Final Report, Rico Wang, Jian Shen, Mac Sisson Sep 2017

Incorporation Of Sea Level Change Scenarios Into Norfolk Harbor And Channels Deepening Study & Elizabeth River Southern Branch Navigation Improvements Study : Final Report, Rico Wang, Jian Shen, Mac Sisson

Reports

Previously the VIMS modeling group has studied the impact of channel deepening on the water quality in lower James River, including Norfolk Harbor and Elizabeth River. A study of the response of the water quality to future Sea Level Change (SLC) is required by present USACE guidance (ER 1100-2-8162 and ETL 1100-2-1). ETL 1100-2-1 recommends analyzing the effects of SLC on the projects at three future time periods of post-construction, including 20 years, 50 years, and 100 years. The future change of sea level is mainly caused by the sea level rise (SLR) in this region. This document provides results ...


Sea-Level Rise & Virginia's Coastal Wetlands, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science Jul 2016

Sea-Level Rise & Virginia's Coastal Wetlands, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science

Reports

Rivers & Coast is a periodic publication of the Center for Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute of Marine Science. The goal of Rivers & Coast is to keep readers well informed of current scientific understanding behind key environmental issues related to watershed rivers and coastal ecosystems of the Chesapeake Bay.


Recurrent Flooding Study For Tidewater Virginia, Molly Mitchell, Carl Hershner, Julie Herman, Daniel E. Schatt, Emily Eggington, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science Jan 2013

Recurrent Flooding Study For Tidewater Virginia, Molly Mitchell, Carl Hershner, Julie Herman, Daniel E. Schatt, Emily Eggington, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science

Reports

No abstract provided.


The Effects Of Sea Level Rise On Tidal Wetlands In The Lynnhaven River Watershed, Marcia Berman, Harry Berquist, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science Jan 2009

The Effects Of Sea Level Rise On Tidal Wetlands In The Lynnhaven River Watershed, Marcia Berman, Harry Berquist, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science

Reports

This study classified tidal wetlands for the Lynnhaven Watershed using remote sensing techniques and high resolution imagery from 2007. This updated delineation of wetlands, was used in conjunction with a simplistic geospatial elevation model to quantify the potential loss of wetlands under various sea level rise scenarios.The study revealed that using conservative estimates of sea level rise, nearly all wetlands would be lost by the year 2100. Projecting sea level rise into the future can be considered speculative, nevertheless such predictions are necessary to begin managing for and planning for climate change impacts. Evidence from this study suggests that ...


Marine Plankton Food Webs And Climate Change, Walker O. Smith Jr., Deborah K. Steinberg, Deborah A. Bronk, Kam W. Tang, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Marine Plankton Food Webs And Climate Change, Walker O. Smith Jr., Deborah K. Steinberg, Deborah A. Bronk, Kam W. Tang, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

VIMS climate change white papers: Marine plankton food webs and climate change


Vulnerability Of Shallow Tidal Water Habitats In Virginia To Climate Change, Donna Marie Bilkovic, Carl H. Herschner, Tamia Rudnicky, Karinna Nunez, Daniel E. Schatt, Sharon Kileen, Marcia Berman, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science Jan 2009

Vulnerability Of Shallow Tidal Water Habitats In Virginia To Climate Change, Donna Marie Bilkovic, Carl H. Herschner, Tamia Rudnicky, Karinna Nunez, Daniel E. Schatt, Sharon Kileen, Marcia Berman, Center For Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science

Reports

The principal objective of this study was to develop a characterization of current shallow-water habitat components in Virginia tidal waters and predict climate driven changes to these habitats. To project broad-scale climate change effects on the abundance and distribution of coastal habitats, an inundation model based on anticipated relative sea-level rise, temperature and salinity projections, and coastal development were integrated into a GIS modeling framework. Using this framework, simple models were constructed that forecast the distribution of key coastal habitat parameters within the next 50 to 100 years including: shallow-water areas, tidal wetlands, submerged aquatic vegetation and estuarine beaches. The ...


Climate Change And Submerged Aquatic Vegetation In Virginia, Kenneth A. Moore, Robert J. Orth, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Climate Change And Submerged Aquatic Vegetation In Virginia, Kenneth A. Moore, Robert J. Orth, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

VIMS climate change white paper: Climate change and submerged aquatic vegetation in Virginia


Climate Change And Aquatic Animal Health In Virginia : Effects And Responses, Wolfgang K. Vogelbein, Eugene M. Burreson, Ryan Carnegie, Jeffrey D. Shields, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Reseach Jan 2009

Climate Change And Aquatic Animal Health In Virginia : Effects And Responses, Wolfgang K. Vogelbein, Eugene M. Burreson, Ryan Carnegie, Jeffrey D. Shields, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Reseach

Reports

Climate change, with concomitant increases in sea level, temperature, greenhouse gases and alterations in precipitation, is a major environmental challenge for the future management of Virginia’s valuable marine resources.


Vims Response To Climate Change 2009, United Nations Environmental Programme : Responding To Climate Change In The Coastal Zone, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Vims Response To Climate Change 2009, United Nations Environmental Programme : Responding To Climate Change In The Coastal Zone, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

VIMS Response to Climate Change 2009 United Nations Environmental Program Responding to climate change in the coastal zone


Extreme Storm Events Increase The Risk For Chemical Contamination Of Coastal Waters, Michael A. Unger, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Extreme Storm Events Increase The Risk For Chemical Contamination Of Coastal Waters, Michael A. Unger, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

Sea-level rise and an increase in the severity of coastal storms are probable outcomes for the Chesapeake Bay due to global climate change. A consequent ecological and economic risk for tidewater Virginia and other low-lying coastal zones is the contamination of coastal waters by industrial and agricultural chemicals released by accidental spills during severe storm events. . . .


Observing And Modeling Global Warming Impacts In Virginia, Mark R. Patterson, Mark Brush, Marjorie A.M. Friedrichs, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Observing And Modeling Global Warming Impacts In Virginia, Mark R. Patterson, Mark Brush, Marjorie A.M. Friedrichs, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

VIMS climate change white paper: Observing and modeling global warming impacts in Virginia


Planning For Sea Level Rise And Coastal Flooding, John D. Boon, Harry V. Wang, Jian Shen, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Planning For Sea Level Rise And Coastal Flooding, John D. Boon, Harry V. Wang, Jian Shen, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

VIMS climate change white papers: Planning for sea level rise and coastal flooding


Land-Coast Connections And Climate Change : Carbon Cycling In Chesapeake Bay And Its Watershed, Elizabeth A. Canuel, James E. Bauer, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science, Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Land-Coast Connections And Climate Change : Carbon Cycling In Chesapeake Bay And Its Watershed, Elizabeth A. Canuel, James E. Bauer, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science, Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

VIMS climate change white paper: Land-coast connections and climate change : carbon cycling in Chesapeake Bay and its watershed


Vanishing And Emerging Ecosystems Of Coastal Virginia : Climate Change Impacts And Adaptation, Emmett J. Duffy, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research Jan 2009

Vanishing And Emerging Ecosystems Of Coastal Virginia : Climate Change Impacts And Adaptation, Emmett J. Duffy, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science. Initiative For Coastal Climate Change Research

Reports

VIMS climate change white papers: Vanishing and emerging ecosystems of coastal Virginia : climate change impacts and adaptation


The Chesapeake Bay : A Synopsis, William J. Hargis Jr. Jan 2003

The Chesapeake Bay : A Synopsis, William J. Hargis Jr.

Reports

No abstract provided.


Benthic Habitat Mapping For Living Resources, Robert J. Diaz, Paul Gapcynski, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science Jan 1990

Benthic Habitat Mapping For Living Resources, Robert J. Diaz, Paul Gapcynski, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science

Reports

Much of the development activity in Chesapeake Bay involves modification to subtidal bottoms. . . .


A Socio-Economic Environmental Baseline Summary For The South Atlantic Region Between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina And Cape Canaveral, Florida Volume 2 : Climatology, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science Sep 1974

A Socio-Economic Environmental Baseline Summary For The South Atlantic Region Between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina And Cape Canaveral, Florida Volume 2 : Climatology, Virginia Institute Of Marine Science

Reports

The geographic area covered in this report extends from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, on the north, to Cape Canaveral, Florida, to the·south. Included within this area are portions of the coastal areas of South Carolina and Georgia. All or portions of thirty coastal counties are included within the study area.

Estuaries in this area tend to be partially mixed due to relatively low runoff per mile of coast. The proximity of the Gulf Stream to the continental shelf and the low runoff combine to cause the salinity of the coastal water to be somewhat higher than that of the ...