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Full-Text Articles in Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Results Of The Deepest All-Sky Survey For Continuous Gravitational Waves On Ligo S6 Data Running On The Einstein@Home Volunteer Distributed Computing Project, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, Michele Zanolin, Et Al. Nov 2016

Results Of The Deepest All-Sky Survey For Continuous Gravitational Waves On Ligo S6 Data Running On The Einstein@Home Volunteer Distributed Computing Project, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, Michele Zanolin, Et Al.

Publications

We report results of a deep all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars in data from the S6 LIGO science run. The search was possible thanks to the computing power provided by the volunteers of the Einstein@Home distributed computing project.


Improved Analysis Of Gw150914 Using A Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al. Oct 2016

Improved Analysis Of Gw150914 Using A Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al.

Publications

This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016).]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom) and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB) model calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations, which forces spin alignment (nonprecessing EOBNR). Here, we present new results that include a 15-dimensional precessing-spin waveform model (precessing EOBNR) developed within the EOB formalism. (See article for remainder of abstract.)


Gw151226: Observation Of Gravitational Waves From A 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al. Jun 2016

Gw151226: Observation Of Gravitational Waves From A 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al.

Publications

We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a significance greater than 5 σ. The signal persisted in the LIGO frequency band for approximately 1 s, increasing in frequency and amplitude over about 55 cycles from 35 ...


Search For Transient Gravitational Waves In Coincidence With Short-Duration Radio Transients During 2007-2013, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, D. Stiles, M. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al. Jun 2016

Search For Transient Gravitational Waves In Coincidence With Short-Duration Radio Transients During 2007-2013, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, D. Stiles, M. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al.

Publications

We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes Fast Radio Bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short-duration radio signals and transient gravitational-wave emission include starquakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational-wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found ...


Observing Gravitational-Wave Transient Gw150914 With Minimal Assumptions, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al. Jun 2016

Observing Gravitational-Wave Transient Gw150914 With Minimal Assumptions, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al.

Publications

The gravitational-wave signal GW150914 was first identified on September 14, 2015, by searches for short-duration gravitational-wave transients. These searches identify time-correlated transients in multiple detectors with minimal assumptions about the signal morphology, allowing them to be sensitive to gravitational waves emitted by a wide range of sources including binary black hole mergers. Over the observational period from September 12 to October 20, 2015, these transient searches were sensitive to binary black hole mergers similar to GW150914 to an average distance of ∼600  Mpc. In this paper, we describe the analyses that first detected GW150914 as well as the parameter estimation ...


Characterization Of Transient Noise In Advanced Ligo Relevant To Gravitational Wave Signal Gw150914, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al. Jun 2016

Characterization Of Transient Noise In Advanced Ligo Relevant To Gravitational Wave Signal Gw150914, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M. J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al.

Publications

On September 14, 2015, a gravitational wave signal from a coalescing black hole binary system was observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors. This paper describes the transient noise backgrounds used to determine the significance of the event (designated GW150914) and presents the results of investigations into potential correlated or uncorrelated sources of transient noise in the detectors around the time of the event. The detectors were operating nominally at the time of GW150914. We have ruled out environmental influences and non-Gaussian instrument noise at either LIGO detector as the cause of the observed gravitational wave signal.


Observation Of Gravitational Waves From A Binary Black Hole Merger, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M, J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al. Feb 2016

Observation Of Gravitational Waves From A Binary Black Hole Merger, B. P. Abbott, K. Gill, B. Hughey, M, J. Szczepańczyk, M. Zanolin, Et Al.

Publications

On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10−21. It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years ...