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Physics Faculty Research & Creative Works

Photoionization

2008

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Full-Text Articles in Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Potential For Ultrafast Dynamic Chemical Imaging With Few-Cycle Infrared Lasers, Toru Morishita, Anh-Thu Le, Zhangjin Chen, C. D. Lin Feb 2008

Potential For Ultrafast Dynamic Chemical Imaging With Few-Cycle Infrared Lasers, Toru Morishita, Anh-Thu Le, Zhangjin Chen, C. D. Lin

Physics Faculty Research & Creative Works

We studied the photoelectron spectra generated by an intense few cycle infrared laser pulse. By focusing on the angular distributions of the back rescattered high energy photoelectrons, we show that accurate differential elastic scattering cross-sections of the target ion by free electrons can be extracted. Since the incident direction and the energy of the free electrons can be easily changed by manipulating the laser's polarization, intensity and wavelength, these extracted elastic scattering cross-sections, in combination with more advanced inversion algorithms, may be used to reconstruct the effective single-scattering potential of the molecule, thus opening up the possibility of using ...


Accurate Retrieval Of Structural Information From Laser-Induced Photoelectron And High-Order Harmonic Spectra By Few-Cycle Laser Pulses, Toru Morishita, Anh-Thu Le, Zhangjin Chen, C. D. Lin Jan 2008

Accurate Retrieval Of Structural Information From Laser-Induced Photoelectron And High-Order Harmonic Spectra By Few-Cycle Laser Pulses, Toru Morishita, Anh-Thu Le, Zhangjin Chen, C. D. Lin

Physics Faculty Research & Creative Works

By analyzing accurate theoretical results from solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of atoms in few-cycle laser pulses, we established the general conclusion that laser-generated high-energy electron momentum spectra and high-order harmonic spectra can be used to extract accurate differential elastic scattering and photo-recombination cross sections of the target ion with free electrons, respectively. Since both electron scattering and photoionization (the inverse of photo-recombination) are the conventional means for interrogating the structure of atoms and molecules, this result implies that existing few-cycle infrared lasers can be implemented for ultrafast imaging of transient molecules with temporal resolution of a few femtoseconds.