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Physical Sciences and Mathematics Commons

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Physics Faculty Research & Creative Works

Atoms

2016

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Theory Of Noncontact Friction For Atom-Surface Interactions, Ulrich D. Jentschura, M. Janke, Maarten F M De Kieviet Aug 2016

Theory Of Noncontact Friction For Atom-Surface Interactions, Ulrich D. Jentschura, M. Janke, Maarten F M De Kieviet

Physics Faculty Research & Creative Works

The noncontact (van der Waals) friction is an interesting physical effect, which has been the subject of controversial scientific discussion. The direct friction term due to the thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field leads to a friction force proportional to 1/Z5 (where Z is the atom-wall distance). The backaction friction term takes into account the feedback of thermal fluctuations of the atomic dipole moment onto the motion of the atom and scales as 1/Z8. We investigate noncontact friction effects for the interactions of hydrogen, ground-state helium, and metastable helium atoms with α-quartz (SiO2), gold (Au ...


Analytical Model For Calibrating Laser Intensity In Strong-Field-Ionization Experiments, Song-Feng. Zhao, Anh-Thu Le, Cheng Jin, Xu Wang, C. D. Lin Feb 2016

Analytical Model For Calibrating Laser Intensity In Strong-Field-Ionization Experiments, Song-Feng. Zhao, Anh-Thu Le, Cheng Jin, Xu Wang, C. D. Lin

Physics Faculty Research & Creative Works

The interaction of an intense laser pulse with atoms and molecules depends extremely nonlinearly on the laser intensity. Yet experimentally there still exists no simple reliable methods for determining the peak laser intensity within the focused volume. Here we present a simple method, based on an improved Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev model, that would allow the calibration of laser intensities from the measured ionization signals of atoms or molecules. The model is first examined by comparing ionization probabilities (or signals) of atoms and several simple diatomic molecules with those from solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We then show the possibility of using ...