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Articles 1 - 30 of 2062

Full-Text Articles in Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Job Announcement: Guillford College Is Hiring A Chair For Its Mathematics Department, Mark Dixon Jan 2020

Job Announcement: Guillford College Is Hiring A Chair For Its Mathematics Department, Mark Dixon

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Guilford College is looking to hire a leader and educator of vision to chair its mathematics department. The chair will have the opportunity to build a revolutionary mathematics program that invites all students into the joy, beauty, creativity, and vitality of mathematics.


Verba Volant, Scripta Manent, Tom Ward Jan 2020

Verba Volant, Scripta Manent, Tom Ward

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

``Most people think typography is about fonts. Most designers think typography is about fonts. Typography is more than that, it's expressing language through type. Placement, composition, typechoice.'' (Mark Boulton)


What The Revolution Requires, Timons Esaias Jan 2020

What The Revolution Requires, Timons Esaias

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

A flash fiction which addresses the coming revolution in the genre of Mathematical Fiction.


The Master Oiler, Ernesto Estrada Jan 2020

The Master Oiler, Ernesto Estrada

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

No abstract provided.


Sigint Signifier, Terry Trowbridge Jan 2020

Sigint Signifier, Terry Trowbridge

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

This poem is a meditation on the concept of signal-to-noise ratios. What is the most minimal signal that can be decoded, regardless of the amount of noise?


The Empress's Nose: A Parable, After Feynman, Robert Dawson Jan 2020

The Empress's Nose: A Parable, After Feynman, Robert Dawson

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

No abstract provided.


A Letter To Niccolò Fontana De Brescia, Jessica Huey Jan 2020

A Letter To Niccolò Fontana De Brescia, Jessica Huey

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

A letter to Niccolò Fontana de Brescia from an undergraduate student.


Perfect (A Poem), Joseph Chaney Jan 2020

Perfect (A Poem), Joseph Chaney

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

This sonnet-length, unrhymed syllabic poem speaks of the way the concept of perfection engages the imagination of mathematicians, an experience it compares to the mysterious, complex attraction we may feel toward a lover.


Statistical Poetry, Lawrence M. Lesser Jan 2020

Statistical Poetry, Lawrence M. Lesser

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

This poetry folder consists of author reflection followed by his eight new poems related to statistics.


Book Review: Prime Suspects: The Anatomy Of Integers And Permutations By Andrew Granville And Jennifer Granville, Paolo Mancosu Jan 2020

Book Review: Prime Suspects: The Anatomy Of Integers And Permutations By Andrew Granville And Jennifer Granville, Paolo Mancosu

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Prime Suspects is a delightful graphic novel that performs what might, prima facie, seem almost like an impossible feat. Apart from the aesthetic pleasure it provides by being a well-illustrated and well thought out graphic novel, I would describe its major conceptual goal to be that of conveying to its reader a taste of the exciting nature of mathematical discovery. This is accomplished by focusing on a set of results connecting the study of prime numbers, the study of cycles of permutations, irreducible polynomials in finite fields and more.


Mathematical Conquerors, Unguru Polarity, And The Task Of History, Mikhail Katz Jan 2020

Mathematical Conquerors, Unguru Polarity, And The Task Of History, Mikhail Katz

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

I compare several approaches to the history of mathematics recently proposed by Blåsjö, Fraser–Schroter, Fried, and others. I argue that tools from both mathematics and history are essential for a meaningful history of the discipline.

In an extension of the Unguru–Weil controversy over the concept of geometric algebra, Michael Fried presents a case against both Andr ́e Weil the “privileged observer” and Pierre de Fermat the “mathematical conqueror.” Here I analyze Fried’s version of Unguru’s alleged polarity between a historian’s and a mathematician’s history. I identify some axioms of Friedian historiographic ideology, and propose ...


Simple Arithmetic: Heavy On Butter, Cream, Wine, Sarah Voss Jan 2020

Simple Arithmetic: Heavy On Butter, Cream, Wine, Sarah Voss

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

The language of poetry is one way to offer perspective on ethical issues and social behavior. The language of mathematics is another. The piece herein combines both these ways.


On "Animals", Ql Converts, And Transfer - An Interview, Gizem Karaali, H. L. Vacher Jan 2020

On "Animals", Ql Converts, And Transfer - An Interview, Gizem Karaali, H. L. Vacher

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

In March 2017, Gizem Karaali interviewed Len Vacher, the editor in chief of Numeracy, the flagship journal of the National Numeracy Network. This is the extended transcript of this conversation, which ranges from quantitative literacy to computational geology, from transfer of learned content and skills to interdisciplinary collaboration.


The User's Guide Project: Looking Back And Looking Forward, Don Larson, Kristen Mazur, David White, Carolyn Yarnall Jan 2020

The User's Guide Project: Looking Back And Looking Forward, Don Larson, Kristen Mazur, David White, Carolyn Yarnall

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

In 2014 Luke Wolcott created the User's Guide Project, in which a group of algebraic topologists came together to write user's guides to coincide with their research papers in hopes of making their research more accessible. We examine the role of this innovative project within the greater mathematics community. We discuss the structure and history of the project, its impact on the community, and its value to the participants of the project. We end by encouraging the math community to recognize the value of the project and expand the User's Guide Project to other subfields.


My Last Fermat’S Last Theorem Talk, Richard Delaware Jan 2020

My Last Fermat’S Last Theorem Talk, Richard Delaware

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

From the dangerous snowfall preceding and nearly ending it, to the pleasant years-long fallout afterward, I tell the story of the events surrounding my final presentation of an expository talk on Fermat’s Last Theorem in the same year but months before Andrew Wiles announced his proof.


My Sets Are My Foundation, Andres Sanchez Jan 2020

My Sets Are My Foundation, Andres Sanchez

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

You might be wondering, what the hell does set theory have to do with writing? I’ll tell you a secret:\ everything is built on sets. Sets are things of beauty. They are great ways to conceptualize, compartmentalize, and classify the world and everything it encompasses. And now I know I’ve danced around the question of what sets have to do with my writing. So, here is my answer: I use set theory as the foundation for all of my writing.


Tired: A Reflection On Asceticism And The Value Of Quantitative Assessment, Frances Dean Jan 2020

Tired: A Reflection On Asceticism And The Value Of Quantitative Assessment, Frances Dean

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

I have spent a lot of time thinking this past year and a half about the relationship between asceticism and success. As a mathematics student and a collegiate athlete, I have far too often gotten caught up in the pursuit of objective standards. This chase has left me burnt out and broken. Existential philosophy has been my greatest asset in discerning the true purpose of asceticism. I reflect on this journey and the nature of assessment in this short reflection.


Surviving Mathematics, Nathalie M. Luna Jan 2020

Surviving Mathematics, Nathalie M. Luna

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

In this essay written in an informal voice, the author shares the ups and downs of her experience in academia. She shares her motivation to study mathematics, her undergraduate experience in Puerto Rico, and her graduate experience in South Texas.


The Healing Powers Of Mathematics In The Age Of #Metoo, Veronica G. Sine Jan 2020

The Healing Powers Of Mathematics In The Age Of #Metoo, Veronica G. Sine

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

The ideas of mathematics can provide metaphors to help people handle traumatic situations, or to better understand life experiences. In this short note, the author describes three ways in which the study of mathematics has given her ways to cope with her own difficult experiences.


On Not Teaching Addition: A Homeschooling Parent Teaches And Researches Math, Marion D. Cohen Jan 2020

On Not Teaching Addition: A Homeschooling Parent Teaches And Researches Math, Marion D. Cohen

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Interactions with the humans in one’s life can have bearings on the way one interacts with one’s work – and vice versa. In particular, the ways in which a math person who is also a parent interacts with their children can correlate with the ways that person interacts with students, colleagues, and with math itself. This article describes some of that correlation in one mathmom’s life. In particular, this mathmom worked toward balancing, both as a mom and as a teacher, her beliefs and feelings with societal mindsets and practices.


Tips For Undergraduate Research Supervisors, Stephan Ramon Garcia Jan 2020

Tips For Undergraduate Research Supervisors, Stephan Ramon Garcia

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

I was recently asked to contribute a paper to a forthcoming Foundations for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics (FURM) volume [1]. The article contained, in addition to several lengthy case studies, a list of brief recommendations for undergraduate research supervisors. Several colleagues suggested developing these general principles into a separate, self-contained article. This is that article.


Mathematical Cognition And The Arts, Marcel Danesi Jan 2020

Mathematical Cognition And The Arts, Marcel Danesi

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

This article revisits the study of mathematics in the arts, and vice versa, the arts in mathematics, with a view to connecting mathematical and artistic creativity to the same neural circuits—a proposition put forward for mathematics and language in a critical 2000 book by Lakoff and Núñez, Where Mathematics Comes From: How the Embodied Mind Brings Mathematics into Being. This expanded perspective would open up suggestive avenues for connecting mathematics, language, and the arts as part of an imaginative blend that comes out in different forms but having the same underlying neural source. Whether or not this can be ...


Mathematical Possibilities In Modernism: Can Literature Be A System?, Arka Chattopadhyay Jan 2020

Mathematical Possibilities In Modernism: Can Literature Be A System?, Arka Chattopadhyay

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

From Aristotle’s Poetics, literature and logic have been companions in approaching the hypothetical realm of the ‘what if.’ In this paper, I focus on the combinatorial possibilities of logic to see how mathematics becomes an important tool for the Modernist text’s aesthetic appeal to anti-representational and self-enclosed systemic autonomy. Is mathematical discourse autonomous vis-à-vis external reality? Can literary Modernism achieve textual autonomy that goes against realistic verisimilitude by following mathematical discourse? Though literary texts often negotiate formal systems with sophisticated governing logics, can literature itself become a logico-mathematical system? I trace the dialectic of form and system in ...


Why Our Hand Is Not The Whole Deck: Embrace, Acceptance, Or Use Of Limitations, Robert S.D. Thomas Jan 2020

Why Our Hand Is Not The Whole Deck: Embrace, Acceptance, Or Use Of Limitations, Robert S.D. Thomas

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

I investigate with examples limitations that mathematicians accept in research: aesthetic, scientific, and practical, in particular, on what bases such choices are made. Discussion is partly in terms of the ideal agents that Philip Kitcher and Brian Rotman used to analyse mathematical writing.


Designing Fractal Line Pied-De-Poules: A Case Study In Algorithmic Design Mediating Between Culture And Fractal Mathematics, Loe M.G. Feijs Jan 2020

Designing Fractal Line Pied-De-Poules: A Case Study In Algorithmic Design Mediating Between Culture And Fractal Mathematics, Loe M.G. Feijs

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Millions of people own and wear pied-de-poule (houndstooth) garments. The pattern has an intriguing basic figure and a typical set of symmetries. The origin of the pattern lies in a specific type of weaving. In this article I apply computational techniques to modernize this ancient decorative pattern. In particular I describe a way to enrich pied-de-poule with a fractal structure.

Although a first fractal line pied-de-poule was shown at Bridges 2015, a number of fundamental questions still remained. The following questions are addressed in this article: Does the original pied-de-poule appear as a limit case when the fractal structure is ...


College Mathematics Students' Peceptions Of "Believing" Teacher Actions, Shelly Sheats Harkness, Bethany A. Noblitt Jan 2020

College Mathematics Students' Peceptions Of "Believing" Teacher Actions, Shelly Sheats Harkness, Bethany A. Noblitt

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Believing and doubting – two methodological processes – deserve equal attention according to Elbow (1986; 2006). When a teacher plays the doubting game in a mathematics classroom her own mathematical thinking dominates and she attempts to find flaws and errors and misconceptions in students’ mathematical thinking. When a teacher plays the believing game in a mathematics classroom she surrenders her own mathematical thinking and she attempts to find virtues and strengths and merits in students’ mathematical thinking. Paradoxically and succinctly, a teacher must believe her own mathematical thinking in order to doubt and a teacher must doubt her own mathematical thinking in ...


Students Studying Students And Reasoning About Reasoning: A Qualitative Analysis, Salvatore J. Petrilli, Grant Clark, Nicholas Demarco, Jack Esposito, Brianne Giuliano, Sara Greiss, Emily Harris, Alessia Merritts, Kyle Murray, Mateusz Piekut, Brian Seidl, Scott Shannon, Nicole Silva, Christina Sullivan, Brittany Willoughby, Yile Zhou Jan 2020

Students Studying Students And Reasoning About Reasoning: A Qualitative Analysis, Salvatore J. Petrilli, Grant Clark, Nicholas Demarco, Jack Esposito, Brianne Giuliano, Sara Greiss, Emily Harris, Alessia Merritts, Kyle Murray, Mateusz Piekut, Brian Seidl, Scott Shannon, Nicole Silva, Christina Sullivan, Brittany Willoughby, Yile Zhou

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

In this work, a faculty member takes a journey along with students as they enhance their understanding of how people solve mathematical problems through a mainly qualitative statistical project. Student authors of this paper registered for a problem solving seminar led by the faculty author, and then created and analyzed self-built assessment tools to explore problem solving techniques. Here we share our findings and recommendations, which we hope will inspire others to explore novel pedagogical techniques in the teaching of mathematical problem solving. We incorporate into our presentation ur voices, reflecting on how we and others solve problems.


From Carriage Wheels To Interest Rates: The Evolution Of Word Problems In Algebra Textbooks From 1901 To Today, Jemma Lorenat, Elodie Arbogast, Ethan Baer, Carla Condori Bazan, Robert Bettinger, Emily Carpenter, Hiawatha Davis Iii, Derick Grant, Olivia Howe, Neil Kelley, Maya Minier, Naima Orozco-Valdivia, Alan Peck, Carolina Saavedra, Sumesh Shiwakoty, Hunter Sidel, Carter Stripp, Josephine Terrien, Simone Wolynski, Leana Yearwood Jan 2020

From Carriage Wheels To Interest Rates: The Evolution Of Word Problems In Algebra Textbooks From 1901 To Today, Jemma Lorenat, Elodie Arbogast, Ethan Baer, Carla Condori Bazan, Robert Bettinger, Emily Carpenter, Hiawatha Davis Iii, Derick Grant, Olivia Howe, Neil Kelley, Maya Minier, Naima Orozco-Valdivia, Alan Peck, Carolina Saavedra, Sumesh Shiwakoty, Hunter Sidel, Carter Stripp, Josephine Terrien, Simone Wolynski, Leana Yearwood

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

In teaching algebra, extra-mathematical word problems can bridge the gap between questions about abstract numbers and questions about everyday life. Thus, more than other aspects of elementary algebra, we would expect word problems to have changed in the recent past. This paper documents the findings of a collective research project that examined the content of such word problems over the past century. Alongside amusing and provocative examples, this paper shows how students can participate in exploratory research with primary sources from the history of mathematics.


The Mathematics Of The Astrolabe And Its History, Graziano Gentili, Luisa Simonutti, Daniele C. Struppa Jan 2020

The Mathematics Of The Astrolabe And Its History, Graziano Gentili, Luisa Simonutti, Daniele C. Struppa

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

In this article we trace the scientific and cultural history of the astrolabe, a mechanical instrument used in the past for astronomical measurements and navigational purposes. The story of the astrolabe is interesting from several points of view, since it intertwines mathematical developments, geographical explorations, changing worldviews, and different cultures and civilizations. In our explorations we move from the early understanding of the world due to the Greeks, to the loss of their work, its rediscovery, the reception of Arab thinkers in Western natural philosophy, and, finally, to the new European culture that emerged with the end of the Middle ...


College Students’ Images Of Mathematicians And Mathematical Careers, Katrina Piatek-Jimenez, Miranda Nouhan, Michaela Williams Jan 2020

College Students’ Images Of Mathematicians And Mathematical Careers, Katrina Piatek-Jimenez, Miranda Nouhan, Michaela Williams

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

In this paper we report our findings of college students’ images of mathematicians and we reflect on different methodologies used to assess this information. The study reported in this paper was conducted in two stages. During the first stage, we asked 179 college students to “draw a mathematician” and also asked them to list five characteristics and five careers for a mathematician. In the second stage of the study, we conducted four focus group interviews with a total of twelve college students. During the focus group interviews, we showed the students 16 photos of real people and asked them to ...