Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Physical Sciences and Mathematics Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 141

Full-Text Articles in Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Soil Heat And Water Flow With A Partial Surface Mulch, Sang-Ok Chung, Robert Horton Jr. Dec 1987

Soil Heat And Water Flow With A Partial Surface Mulch, Sang-Ok Chung, Robert Horton Jr.

Agronomy Publications

A computer model using the alternating direction implicit (ADI) finite difference method to study two-dimensional coupled soil heat and water flow with a partial surface mulch cover is developed. A new, simplified computational procedure, which has only tridiagonal matrix problems, for the ADI method is introduced. The model uses a soil surface energy balance equation to determine soil surface boundary conditions for both heat and water flow. The inputs required for the computer simulations are weather data, soil thermal and hydraulic properties, and mulch data. Numerical experiments are performed to examine the effects of soil type, mulch width, and weather ...


A Review Of Machinery For Cropping With Reduced Water Erosion, K J. Bligh Oct 1987

A Review Of Machinery For Cropping With Reduced Water Erosion, K J. Bligh

Resource management technical reports

No abstract provided.


Rise To Power Of Senator Joseph R. Mccarthy: Reflections Of The Cold War Mccarthy Era In American Film, Scott Lainer May 1987

Rise To Power Of Senator Joseph R. Mccarthy: Reflections Of The Cold War Mccarthy Era In American Film, Scott Lainer

Honors Theses

The common bond between much of the film industry and Joseph McCarthy was insecurity and the drive for national approval. If one grasps the specific characteristics of McCarthy the man, and the methods of these politically "inspired" movies, we can to better place the period into context and acknowledge the fact that, if the citizenry is not aware, and is again caught by an ever-building wave of trickle down sentiment, the 1950s might not prove to be an isolated period in American history. Insecurity was not a fifties novelty. It still exists, and could potentially escalate anti-Communist policy and sentiment ...


Disturbed Alpine Ecosystems: Seedling Establishment Of Early And Late Seral Dominant Species, Jeanne C. Chambers May 1987

Disturbed Alpine Ecosystems: Seedling Establishment Of Early And Late Seral Dominant Species, Jeanne C. Chambers

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

This study examined the effects of seedbed and seedling environment on establishment of early and late seral dominant alpine species. Species studied included late seral dominant forbs (Geum rossii, Artemisia scopulorum, and Polemonium viscosum), early seral dominant forbs (Potentilla diversifolia and Sibbaldia procumbens), a late seral dominant grass (Festuca idahoensis), and early seral dominant grasses (Calamagrostis purpurascens and Deschampsia cespitosa). Germination responses of each species to wet vs. dry cold stratification and light vs. dark conditions were investigated. No statistical differences were observed in the seed germination of early and late seral dominant forbs or early and late seral dominant ...


Marketing Quality Alfalfa Hay, Garry D. Lacefield Feb 1987

Marketing Quality Alfalfa Hay, Garry D. Lacefield

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Alfalfa hay is a potentially marketable-profitable product if--if quality is satisfactory to meet buyer's needs, if it is packaged such that it meets buyer's feeding program and can be transported efficiently, if in sufficient quantity, if storage site is accessible by truck or trailer, and if it is competitively priced. Meeting these minimum criteria only means the hay is potentially marketable; only after it has been sold does it become potentially profitable.


Feeding Alfalfa To South Carolina Dairy Herds, Fred E. Pardue, Terry Sudduth Feb 1987

Feeding Alfalfa To South Carolina Dairy Herds, Fred E. Pardue, Terry Sudduth

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

The nutritional value of alfalfa hay is important if it is to be used competitively with other feedstuffs in rations being fed to South Carolina Dairy Herds. Excellent quality hay has high nutrient concentration, digestibility and intake. The appearance of good physical characteristics of alfalfa hay as well as other hays and forages along with the knowledge of harvest dates, stages of maturity, and other conditions are not enough and can be deceiving. Therefore, forage testing is crucial and very important.


Marketing Kentucky Hay — An Update, J. Kenneth Evans Feb 1987

Marketing Kentucky Hay — An Update, J. Kenneth Evans

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Based on soil capabilities, Kentucky could grow 2-million acres of alfalfa while increasing the acreage of corn and soybeans. Even more than 2-million acres could be grown if Kentucky grown alfalfa should show market demands making it economically competitive with corn and soybeans. Marketing is the key to developing demand which could make hay a $1-billion Kentucky crop.

Many of you have heard or read my comments on marketing hay. In this presentation, I will present a brief review of what I have previously said and then bring you up to date on hay marketing activities since the alfalfa conference ...


Evaluating Alfalfa Grazing — Dollars And Cents, Robert N. Barnes Feb 1987

Evaluating Alfalfa Grazing — Dollars And Cents, Robert N. Barnes

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Returns on many Kentucky farms are declining due to reduced tobacco and feedgrain income. This fact, coupled with traditionally low (or negative) returns from typical cow/calf beef enterprises, has been associated with interest in alternative crop and livestock production systems. Alfalfa produced as a cash crop is increasing and many farmers are realizing substantial returns. In the Central Kentucky Area, many farmers have been stimulated to produce alfalfa since demand for high quality hay by horse farms has been strong. As interest in alfalfa is renewed, other farms have begun to introduce intensive or controlled grazing techniques in order ...


Grazing Options In Alfalfa Utilization, Paul D. Deaton Feb 1987

Grazing Options In Alfalfa Utilization, Paul D. Deaton

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Objective

  1. The pure alfalfa stand would not be damaged during the grazing period.
  2. For steers - animal performance while on the alfalfa was more important than pounds of beef produced per acre.
  3. For cow/calf - animal density high enough to remove green leaf area in maximum of 5 days.
  4. Initiate the demonstration with a minimal out-of-pocket cost for fence, water system, etc.
  5. Minimize the occurrence of bloat where possible.


Comparison Of Electrical Moisture Meters For Baled Alfalfa Hay, W. H. Henson Jr., G. M. Turner, Michael Collins, O. J. Yeoman Feb 1987

Comparison Of Electrical Moisture Meters For Baled Alfalfa Hay, W. H. Henson Jr., G. M. Turner, Michael Collins, O. J. Yeoman

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

A primary concern in producing quality alfalfa hay is moisture measurement. Some precision in moisture measurement is required since hay can be too wet, leading to dry matter and quality loss through mold; it can be too dry, leading to shatter loss during baling, handling and storage.

Moisture measurement in hay can take many forms. One form of subjective (personal judgment) evaluation is brittleness of leaves and stems in the windrow or bale. Typical objective methods consist of electric meters with calibration curves and oven drying.


Advances In Alfalfa Weed Control, James R. Martin Feb 1987

Advances In Alfalfa Weed Control, James R. Martin

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

The most significant advances in weed control in alfalfa have originated from developments in herbicide technology, This method of weed control began over 20 years ago when such herbicides as EPTC and 2,4-DB were being used by alfalfa farmers. Since then, more than twelve herbicides have been added to the list of products recommended for weed control in alfalfa. (For specific recommendations, see Extension publication "Chemical Control of Weeds in Kentucky Farm Crops", AGR-6).


Influence Of Potato Leafhopper On Alfalfa Yield And Quality, C. M. Christensen Feb 1987

Influence Of Potato Leafhopper On Alfalfa Yield And Quality, C. M. Christensen

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

The potato leafhopper has the distinction of being one of the native insects that can have a very major impact on the production characteristics of alfalfa. This insect is very definitely the second most important pest of this crop, with the alfalfa weevil, an imported insect, holding the distinction of being the most damaging. These tiny insects (full grown potato leafhoppers are 1/8 inch long) have a very definite impact on alfalfa but their damage is very insidious and hard to recognize.


Quality Seed Production And Use, Garry D. Lacefield Feb 1987

Quality Seed Production And Use, Garry D. Lacefield

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Quality seed is an important consideration and investment in an efficient alfalfa program. Farmers who depend on alfalfa need to be certain that the seed they purchase is of high quality. High quality seed means it must be free of noxious weeds, have a purity of 99.5 percent, a germination of approximately 90 percent or higher and be seed that is true to the variety stated.


Effects Of Soils And Fertility On Alfalfa Production, Monroe Rasnake Feb 1987

Effects Of Soils And Fertility On Alfalfa Production, Monroe Rasnake

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Alfalfa can be grown anywhere in Kentucky and on a wide range of soil types. This statement seems to contrast with what we are accustomed to hearing in regard to alfalfa. The usual statement is: "Alfalfa requires a deep, well drained and highly fertile soil . . .". Actually, the two statements are not conflicting. They just represent the plant-soil interactions. The first looks at what is possible while the other is concerned with the ideal situation. In order to understand these different perspectives, we need to consider how soil characteristics affect the alfalfa plant.


Foreword [1987], Garry D. Lacefield Feb 1987

Foreword [1987], Garry D. Lacefield

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

This is the front matter of the proceedings.


Wheat And Barley Experiments On The Kumarl Soils At Salmon Gums, D A. Collins, Michael D A Bolland, R D. Fletcher Jan 1987

Wheat And Barley Experiments On The Kumarl Soils At Salmon Gums, D A. Collins, Michael D A Bolland, R D. Fletcher

Technical Bulletins

The water-holding capacity of these soils, and their location in a low rainfall area combine to make them marginal for producing grain. In contrast to sowing wheat on ley pasture, mechanically fallowing the year before planting markedly improved grain yields by 1.3 to 4 times.


Wheat Experimental Results, S. P. Loss Jan 1987

Wheat Experimental Results, S. P. Loss

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

The development of wheat relative to frost susceptibility, 87NA10. Optimum flowering times of wheat, 87NA11 and 87WH8. Grain growth and development of a historical set of wheats.


Tillage Investigations., R. J. Jarvis, L. G. Butcher, L. D.J. Smith Jan 1987

Tillage Investigations., R. J. Jarvis, L. G. Butcher, L. D.J. Smith

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

77A16, red/brown sandy loam - York gum. 77WH17, yellow clayey-sand (Wongan loamy sand). 77M13, red sandy clay loam (Salmon Gum, Gimlet). 77Mt15, gravelly loamy sand/sandy loam - forest soil. 77A43 brown loamy sand/sandy loam - jam country. 77WH88, grey loamy sand over gravel at 50 cm - Elphin soil series – Mallee. 77M56, red sandy clay loam - salmon gum, Gimlet. 82M35, Loamy sand/sandy loam – Mallee. 77E52, fine white sand over gravel at 40 cm. 85SG28, grey-brown calcareous Earth - Kumarl – SGRS. 84M064, heavy land management systems - medium rainfall area. 84M063, heavy land management systems - ne wheat belt - continuous wheat additional heavy land ...


Lupin Seeding Rates, Pea Seeding Rates, And Weed Control., K. French, A. Little Jan 1987

Lupin Seeding Rates, Pea Seeding Rates, And Weed Control., K. French, A. Little

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

Lupin seeding rates, 87ME70. Lupin seeding rates on deep soils, 87ME71. Lupin seeding rates on shallow duplex or gravel soils, 87N27. Lupin seeding rates on deep soils, 87N28, 87A27. Lupin seeding rates on shallow duplex or gravel soils, 87KA54, 87TS32, 87NA88, 87M066, Lupin seeding rates on heavy soil, 87A26, 87TS33. Lupin seeding rate by seed size, 87ME92. Pea seeding rates, 87ME72, 87KA56. Broadleaf weed control in field peas, 87LG41. Grass control in peas, 87LG53


An Inventory And Condition Survey Of Rangelands In The Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia, A L. Payne, G F. Spencer, P J. Curry Jan 1987

An Inventory And Condition Survey Of Rangelands In The Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia, A L. Payne, G F. Spencer, P J. Curry

Technical Bulletins

The inventory and condition survey of rangelands in the Carnarvon Basin, undertaken by the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) between 1980 and 1982, describes and maps the natural resources of the region’s pastoral leasehold land. This survey report provides a baseline record of the existence and condition of the natural area’s resources, to assist with the planning and implementation of land management practices. The report identified and described the condition of soils, landforms, vegetation, habitat, ecosystems, and declared plants and animals. It also assessed the impact of pastoralism and made land management recommendations. The area ...


Effect Of Agronomic Practices On Wheat Protein Levels, M G. Mason Jan 1987

Effect Of Agronomic Practices On Wheat Protein Levels, M G. Mason

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

High grain protein levels are preferred for many end-uses of wheat. However, there has been little or no incentive for farmers to use practices which would increase protein levels, because wheat payments are made without a price differential for proteinlevel, except where wheat could qualify for the Australian Hard grade.


Plot Size Trial (Wheat), G. J. Lewis Jan 1987

Plot Size Trial (Wheat), G. J. Lewis

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

To determine if plot size (length or width) x cultivar or seeding machine x cultivar interactions exist within a set of wheat cultivars. 87BA20, 87N20, 87WH36, To examine the relationship between the relative yield of wheat cultivars grown in experiments and in similarly treated bulk areas at the same site. 87M80.


Crop Agronomy., S. Porritt Jan 1987

Crop Agronomy., S. Porritt

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

Seeding machinery for stubble retention in lupin cereal rotations, 85LG21, and 85LG22. Dynamic Lifter (cereal mix) fertiliser evaluation, 86LG2. Cultural systems for lupin: wheat rotations on water repellent soils, 87ES2. Stubble retention and Rovral for brownspot control in lupins, 87M66. Straw length Effects on wheat growth on red-brown earths, 87M70. Row spacing and stubble retention effects on wheat growth on red-brown earths, 87M71. Nitrogen fertiliser for wheat production after volunteer pasture or sub clover-based pasture, 87ME73 and 87ME74. Effect of seeding rate and sowing depth on lupin establishment, 87ME75. Time of seeding various wheat varieties, 87WE76.


The Role Of Barley In Future Rotational Systems In Drier Wheatbelt Areas Of Western Australia., P. Simpson Jan 1987

The Role Of Barley In Future Rotational Systems In Drier Wheatbelt Areas Of Western Australia., P. Simpson

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

Comparison of barley and wheat yields over four soil types and yield component analysis at Nangeenan NW of Merredin, 86ME88, 86ME89, 86ME90 and 86ME91. Comparison of barley and wheat yields over four soil types at Bodallin, east of Merredin, 86ME92, 86ME93, 86ME94 and 86ME95. Comparison of barley and wheat yields over two ‘levels’ of soil salinity - EC, 87ME63 and 87ME64. Comparison of barley and wheat yields over 2 soils of differing textural type – ‘heavy’ and ‘light’, 87ME65 and 87ME66. Effect of time of sowing on barley and wheat yields, 87ME67.


Grain Legumes Evaluation., G. H. Walton, T. R. Trent Jan 1987

Grain Legumes Evaluation., G. H. Walton, T. R. Trent

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

Lupin agronomy, 87AL14. Nitrogen fertilizer for legume crops, 87BA2. Pea variety evaluation, 87C59, 87M08, 87ME1, 87N012, 87SG8, 87KA7, 87N2. Interstate pea variety trials, 87N096, 87N099, 87KA6. Disease Resistance Pea Variety Testing, 87JE1. Grain legume species comparisons, 87A2, 87C2, 87KA37, 87M09, 87MA1, 87NA15. Legume species variety trials, 87LG2. Faba bean evaluation, 87MC34 and 87KA8. Faba bean 'synthetic' variety yield trial, 87MC36. Faba bean screening nursery, 87MC35. Preliminary agronomy of faba bean, chickpea and lentil, 87A21. Seeding date, 87A22. Legume species herbicide tolerance, 87KA82.


Disease And Insect Resistance; Murex Medic Evaluation; Legume Species Phasic Development, D J. Gillespie Jan 1987

Disease And Insect Resistance; Murex Medic Evaluation; Legume Species Phasic Development, D J. Gillespie

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

A summary of the performance of the control varieties (four replications) is shown in Table 3. A summary of the root rot ratings for some varieties showing a range of root rot susceptibility to all four pathogens is given in Table 4. Plant weights were recorded for all varieties tested against the three pathogens in the Western Australian experiments. Results for 12 of the 60 varieties are shown in Table 5. Murex medic evaluation. 86MT56 (Mount Barker), Gravelly loam pH 5.2 (water). 86NA46 (Darken) Loamy sand pH 5.4 86M037 (Regans Ford) Fine red sand pH 5.8 All ...


Productivity Of Grazed Legume Pastures., Pasture Agronomy Branch Jan 1987

Productivity Of Grazed Legume Pastures., Pasture Agronomy Branch

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

86MT51, 86MT55, Mt Barker research station. Aim, treatment, detail, results.


Evaluation Of New Pasture Legume Species In Terms Of Summer Feeding Value And Effects On Wool Production., S E. Flecker, C W. Thorn, J. B. Rowe, Tess Casson Jan 1987

Evaluation Of New Pasture Legume Species In Terms Of Summer Feeding Value And Effects On Wool Production., S E. Flecker, C W. Thorn, J. B. Rowe, Tess Casson

Experimental Summaries - Plant Research

86KA71, Pasture legumes improve the feeding value of summer pastures in a mediterranean-type environment by maintaining the protein intake of grazing animals over the dry summer period, much of which comes from the ingestion of legume burr (A.D. Wilson and N.L. Hindley, 1968). Some of the most important species of pasture legumes to have been released commercially are Trifolium subterraneum (sub.clover), Medicago truncatula (barrel medic) and Medicago polymorpha (burr medic) (D.B. Purser, G.B. Taylor and W.J. Collins, 1987). What little information is available on the feeding value of these species suggests that barrel medic ...


Field Peas In The Wheatbelt, R J. French Jan 1987

Field Peas In The Wheatbelt, R J. French

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Plantings of lupins in the Western Australian wheatbelt increased rapidly in the late 1970s and early 980s as improved varieties became available and farmers realised the benefits to be gained from growing grain legumes. Grain legumes are useful not simply as alternative cash crops. They provide 'fixed' atmospheric nitrogewn to following cereal crops and act as a cleaning crop to break cereal disease cycles. They are also valuable sheep feed.

In 1975, throughout the wheatbelt, the Department of Agriculture began a comparison of several alternative legumes. The crops included field peas, faba beans, chickpeas, lentills and various vetches. Field peas ...


Gypsum Use In The Wheatbelt, M R. Howell Jan 1987

Gypsum Use In The Wheatbelt, M R. Howell

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

One of the limitations to crop productivity in the wheatbelt is the poor structure of heavy textured soils. Many years of clearing and cultivation have caused the loss of soil organic matter and breakdown of soil aggregates - particles of sand, silt and clay - in the surface layers. This has led to the development of unstable soils with poor physical properties.

Although loss of soil structure is a serious problem, it can be reversed by altering the tillage practices that caused the problem. This improvement in soil structure and return to productivity can be a slow process. However gypsum can be ...