Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Sports Medicine Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Sports Medicine

Differential Gene Expression Of Foxo1, Id1, And Id3 Between Young And Older Men And Associations With Muscle Mass And Function, Thomas W. Buford, Matthew B. Cooke, Brian D. Shelmadine, Geoffrey M. Hudson, Liz L. Redd, Darryn S. Willoughby Jun 2011

Differential Gene Expression Of Foxo1, Id1, And Id3 Between Young And Older Men And Associations With Muscle Mass And Function, Thomas W. Buford, Matthew B. Cooke, Brian D. Shelmadine, Geoffrey M. Hudson, Liz L. Redd, Darryn S. Willoughby

Faculty Publications

Background and aims: Aging is associated with significant losses of skeletal muscle mass and function. Numerous biochemical molecules have been implicated in the development of these age-related changes, however evidence from human models is sparse. Assessment of transcript expression is useful as it requires minimal tissue and may potentially be used in clinical trials. This study aimed to compare mRNA expression of proteolytic genes in skeletal muscle of young (18–35 yrs) and older (55–75 yrs) men.

Methods: Muscle tissue was obtained from young (n=14, 21.35±01.03 yrs) and older (n=13, 63.85±1.83 ...


Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2011, St. Cloud State University Mar 2011

Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2011, St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter

Contents of this issue include:

  • Kelly's Corner by David Bacharach
  • Socket Wall Texture by Janna Miron
  • Don’t Lose the Big Picture: Insights for Training by Dennis Madden
  • Block Angle in Swim Starts by Kate Kaufmann
  • Ischemic Strength Training by Chad Johnson
  • HPL Alumni Feature: Dr. Bruce Johnson, 1983


Post-Exercise Protein Synthesis Rates Are Only Marginally Higher In Type I Compared With Type Ii Muscle Fibres Following Resistance-Type Exercise, René Koopman, Benjamin G. Gleeson, Annemie P. Gijsen, Bart B. L. Groen, Joan M. G. Senden, Michael J. Rennie, Luc J. C. Van Loon Jan 2011

Post-Exercise Protein Synthesis Rates Are Only Marginally Higher In Type I Compared With Type Ii Muscle Fibres Following Resistance-Type Exercise, René Koopman, Benjamin G. Gleeson, Annemie P. Gijsen, Bart B. L. Groen, Joan M. G. Senden, Michael J. Rennie, Luc J. C. Van Loon

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

We examined the effect of an acute bout of resistance exercise on fractional muscle protein synthesis rates in human type I and type II muscle fibres. After a standardised breakfast (31 ± 1 kJ kg−1 body weight, consisting of 52 Energy% (En%) carbohydrate, 34 En% protein and 14 En% fat), 9 untrained men completed a lower-limb resistance exercise bout (8 sets of 10 repetitions leg press and leg extension at 70% 1RM). A primed, continuous infusion of l-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine was combined with muscle biopsies collected from both legs immediately after exercise and after 6 h of post-exercise recovery. Single ...


Exercise-Induced Splanchnic Hypoperfusion Results In Gut Dysfunction In Healthy Men, Kim V. Wijck, Kaatje Lenaerts, Luc Van Loon, Wilbert H. M. Peters, Wim A. Buurman, Cornelis H. C. Dejong Jan 2011

Exercise-Induced Splanchnic Hypoperfusion Results In Gut Dysfunction In Healthy Men, Kim V. Wijck, Kaatje Lenaerts, Luc Van Loon, Wilbert H. M. Peters, Wim A. Buurman, Cornelis H. C. Dejong

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Background Splanchnic hypoperfusion is common in various pathophysiological conditions and often considered to lead to gut dysfunction. While it is known that physiological situations such as physical exercise also result in splanchnic hypoperfusion, the consequences of flow redistribution at the expense of abdominal organs remained to be determined. This study focuses on the effects of splanchnic hypoperfusion on the gut, and the relationship between hypoperfusion, intestinal injury and permeability during physical exercise in healthy men. Methods and Findings Healthy men cycled for 60 minutes at 70% of maximum workload capacity. Splanchnic hypoperfusion was assessed using gastric tonometry. Blood, sampled every ...