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Sports Medicine Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Sports Medicine

The Acute Effects Of Whole Body Vibration On Isometric Mid-Thigh Pull Performance, W. Guy Hornsby, Mark A. South, Ashley Kavanaugh, Andrew S. Layne, G. Gregory Haff, William A. Sands, Marco Cardinale, Michael W. Ramsey, Michael H. Stone Dec 2009

The Acute Effects Of Whole Body Vibration On Isometric Mid-Thigh Pull Performance, W. Guy Hornsby, Mark A. South, Ashley Kavanaugh, Andrew S. Layne, G. Gregory Haff, William A. Sands, Marco Cardinale, Michael W. Ramsey, Michael H. Stone

ETSU Faculty Works

Acute exposure to vibration has been suggested to produce transient increases in muscular strength (1,2,8), vertical jump displacement (4,8), and power output (2,6,7) recorded while performing various tasks. It has been hypothesized that the reported acute vibration induced increases in performance occur as a result of alterations in neuromuscular stimulation (1,3,4). Specifically, most studies have ascribed the observed improvements to the likeliness of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) in producing a “tonic vibration reflex” (TVR) in which the primary nerve endings of the Ia afferents of the muscle spindle are activated. This is thought ...


Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2009, St. Cloud State University Mar 2009

Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2009, St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter

Contents of this issue include:

  • Kelly's Corner by David Bacharach
  • Visitor from Abroad by Mary Uderman (Zheng Xiaohong)
  • Is Stretching Before Exercise Really Beneficial? by Ashlee Ford
  • From the Drawing Board to the Track by Sam Johnson
  • Is It Easier for Men to Shed the Pounds? by April Kuschke


Exercise In The Treatment And Prevention Of Diabetes, Sheri R. Colberg, Carmine R. Grieco Jan 2009

Exercise In The Treatment And Prevention Of Diabetes, Sheri R. Colberg, Carmine R. Grieco

Human Movement Sciences Faculty Publications

The inclusion of regular physical activity is critical for optimal insulin action and glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Current research suggests that Type II diabetes mellitus can be prevented and that all types of diabetes can be controlled with physical activity, largely through improvements in muscular sensitivity to insulin. This article discusses diabetes prevention and the acute and chronic benefits of exercise for individuals with diabetes, along with the importance and impact of aerobic, resistance, or combined training upon glycemic control. To undertake physical activity safely, individuals also must learn optimal management of glycemia.


Dietary Supplement Increases Plasma Norepinephrine, Lipolysis, And Metabolic Rate In Resistance Trained Men, Richard Bloomer, Kelley Fisher-Wellman, Kelley Hammond, Brian K. Schilling, Adrianna Weber, Bradford Cole Jan 2009

Dietary Supplement Increases Plasma Norepinephrine, Lipolysis, And Metabolic Rate In Resistance Trained Men, Richard Bloomer, Kelley Fisher-Wellman, Kelley Hammond, Brian K. Schilling, Adrianna Weber, Bradford Cole

Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences Faculty Publications

Background

Dietary supplements targeting fat loss and increased thermogenesis are prevalent within the sport nutrition/weight loss market. While some isolated ingredients have been reported to be efficacious when used at high dosages, in particular in animal models and/or via intravenous delivery, little objective evidence is available pertaining to the efficacy of a finished product taken by human subjects in oral form. Moreover, many ingredients function as stimulants, leading to increased hemodynamic responses. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of a finished dietary supplement on plasma catecholamine concentration, markers of lipolysis, metabolic rate, and hemodynamics ...