Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Medicine and Health Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2004

Discipline
Institution
Keyword
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 2312

Full-Text Articles in Medicine and Health Sciences

Mental Health And Employment Transitions, Carole Gresenz, Roland Sturm Jan 2013

Mental Health And Employment Transitions, Carole Gresenz, Roland Sturm

Roland Sturm

No abstract provided.


Does Relative Deprivation Predict The Need For Mental Health Services?, Christine Eibner, Carole Gresenz, Roland Sturm Jan 2013

Does Relative Deprivation Predict The Need For Mental Health Services?, Christine Eibner, Carole Gresenz, Roland Sturm

Roland Sturm

No abstract provided.


Development Of Dose Conversion Coefficients For Radionuclides Produced In Spallation Neutron Sources: Quarterly Progress Report 9/1/04 – 12/31/04, Phillip W. Patton, Mark Rudin Dec 2004

Development Of Dose Conversion Coefficients For Radionuclides Produced In Spallation Neutron Sources: Quarterly Progress Report 9/1/04 – 12/31/04, Phillip W. Patton, Mark Rudin

Transmutation Sciences Physics (TRP)

The research consortium comprised of representatives from several universities and national laboratories has successfully generated internal and external dose conversion coefficients for twenty radionuclides produced in spallation neutron sources. In addition, the group has identified twenty radionuclide that are missing electron capture files and eighteen additional radionuclides missing substantial physical data.


Cetacean Brain Evolution: Multiplication Generates Complexity, Lori Marino Dec 2004

Cetacean Brain Evolution: Multiplication Generates Complexity, Lori Marino

Anatomy Collection

Over the past 55-60 million years cetacean (dolphin, whale, and porpoise) brains have become hyperexpanded so that modern cetacean encephalization levels are second only to modern humans. At the same time, brain expansion proceeded along very different lines than in other large-brained mammals so that substantial differences between modern cetacean brains and other mammalian brains exist at every level of brain organization. Perhaps the most profound difference between cetacean and other mammalian brains is in the architecture of the neocortex. Cetaceans possess a unique underlying neocortical organizational scheme that is particularly intriguing in light of the fact that cetaceans exhibit ...


Public Health Abstracts 2004 Dec 2004

Public Health Abstracts 2004

Florida Public Health Review

No abstract provided.


Modulating Hiv-1 Replication By Rna Interference Directed Against Human Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5, Yueh-Hsin Ping, Chia-Ying Chu, Hong Cao, Jean-Marc Jacque, Mario Stevenson, Tariq M. Rana Dec 2004

Modulating Hiv-1 Replication By Rna Interference Directed Against Human Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5, Yueh-Hsin Ping, Chia-Ying Chu, Hong Cao, Jean-Marc Jacque, Mario Stevenson, Tariq M. Rana

Open Access Publications by UMass Chan Authors

BACKGROUND: Several cellular positive and negative elongation factors are involved in regulating RNA polymerase II processivity during transcription elongation in human cells. In recruiting several of these regulatory factors to the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter during transcription elongation, HIV-1 modulates replication of its genome in a process mediated by the virus-encoded transactivator Tat. One particular cellular regulatory factor, DSIF subunit human SPT5 (hSpt5), has been implicated in both positively and negatively regulating transcriptional elongation but its role in Tat transactivation in vivo and in HIV-1 replication has not been completely elucidated. RESULTS: To understand the in vivo function ...


Regulation Of Cell Cycle By The Anaphase Spindle Midzone, Maki Murata-Hori, Greenfield Sluder, Yu-Li Wang Dec 2004

Regulation Of Cell Cycle By The Anaphase Spindle Midzone, Maki Murata-Hori, Greenfield Sluder, Yu-Li Wang

Open Access Publications by UMass Chan Authors

BACKGROUND: A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle.

RESULTS: We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell ...


Isolating Adult Psychological Correlates Of Witnessing Parental Violence: Findings From A Predominantly Latina Sample, Corrie A. Davies, David Dilillo, Isaac G. Martinez Dec 2004

Isolating Adult Psychological Correlates Of Witnessing Parental Violence: Findings From A Predominantly Latina Sample, Corrie A. Davies, David Dilillo, Isaac G. Martinez

Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology

This study examined the relationship between childhood exposure to parental violence and adult psychological functioning in a sample of predominantly Mexican American participants. Questionnaires assessing childhood maltreatment, family environment, and current psychological symptomatology were completed by 142 female undergraduates. Findings revealed that witnessing parental violence in childhood was associated with depressive symptoms, low self-esteem, and trauma symptoms in adulthood, even after controlling for child physical and sexual abuse. However, in subsequent analyses, also controlling for levels of nonphysical family conflict, previous associations between exposure to parental violence and adult symptomatology were reduced, such that trauma-related symptoms remained the sole outcome ...


Understanding Perpetrators Of Nonphysical Sexual Coercion: Characteristics Of Those Who Cross The Line, Sarah Degue, David Dilillo Dec 2004

Understanding Perpetrators Of Nonphysical Sexual Coercion: Characteristics Of Those Who Cross The Line, Sarah Degue, David Dilillo

Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology

Sexual coercion is defined here as a form of male sexual misconduct in which nonphysical tactics (e.g., verbal pressure) are utilized to gain sexual contact with an unwilling female partner. This study compares the risk characteristics of sexually coercive (n = 81) and nonoffending college males (n = 223) across several domains. Results revealed that sexual coercers differed from nonoffenders in that they more often subscribed to rape myths, viewed interpersonal violence as more acceptable, reported greater hostility toward females, and perceived male-female relationships as more inherently adversarial. In addition, compared to nonoffenders, sexually coercive males showed stronger indicators of promiscuity ...


Parental Beliefs Regarding Developmental Benefits Of Childhood Injuries, Terri Lewis, David Dilillo, Lizette Peterson Dec 2004

Parental Beliefs Regarding Developmental Benefits Of Childhood Injuries, Terri Lewis, David Dilillo, Lizette Peterson

Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology

Objective: To assess parental beliefs that minor childhood injuries play a beneficial role in the development of young children.
Methods: Mothers and fathers of 159 children, ages 15 to 40 months, completed the Injury Attitudes Questionnaire (IAQ), designed to assess parental beliefs that children "learn from" and "toughen up" as a result of experiencing minor injuries.
Results: A main effect for parent gender was found such that fathers endorsed stronger beliefs than did mothers regarding the developmental benefits of injuries.
Conclusions: The accuracy of these beliefs as well as their relevance to parental injury-prevention behaviors is discussed.


A Meta-Analytic Review Of The Effects Of High Stress On Eyewitness Memory, Kenneth A. Deffenbacher, Brian H. Bornstein, Steven D. Penrod, E. Kiernan Mcgorty Dec 2004

A Meta-Analytic Review Of The Effects Of High Stress On Eyewitness Memory, Kenneth A. Deffenbacher, Brian H. Bornstein, Steven D. Penrod, E. Kiernan Mcgorty

Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology

In the past 30 years researchers have examined the impact of heightened stress on the fidelity of eyewitness memory. Meta-analyses were conducted on 27 independent tests of the effects of heightened stress on eyewitness identification of the perpetrator or target person and separately on 36 tests of eyewitness recall of details associated with the crime. There was considerable support for the hypothesis that high levels of stress negatively impact both types of eyewitness memory. Meta-analytic Z-scores, whether unweighted or weighted by sample size, ranged from -5.40 to -6.44 (high stress condition–low stress condition). The overall effect sizes ...


Retinol Improves Bovine Embryonic Development In Vitro, Tracy Livingston, Dawn Eberhardt, J. Lannett Edwards, James Godkin Dec 2004

Retinol Improves Bovine Embryonic Development In Vitro, Tracy Livingston, Dawn Eberhardt, J. Lannett Edwards, James Godkin

Faculty Publications and Other Works -- Large Animal Clinical Sciences

Abstract

Retinoids are recognized as important regulators of vertebrate development, cell differentiation, and tissue function. Previous studies, performed both in vivo and in vitro, indicate that retinoids influence several reproductive events, including follicular development, oocyte maturation and early embryonic development. The present study evaluated in vitro effects of retinol addition to media containing maturing bovine oocytes and developing embryos in both a low oxygen atmosphere (7%) and under atmospheric oxygen conditions (20%). In the first experiment, abbatoir collected bovine oocytes were matured in the presence or absence of varying concentrations of retinol. After a 22–24 hour maturation period the ...


Public Health, Primary Care, And Privatization Dec 2004

Public Health, Primary Care, And Privatization

Florida Public Health Review

No abstract provided.


Interdependent Assembly Of Specific Regulatory Lipids And Membrane Fusion Proteins Into The Vertex Ring Domain Of Docked Vacuoles, Rutilio A. Fratti, Youngsoo Jun, Alexey J. Merz, Nathan Margolis, William Wickner Dec 2004

Interdependent Assembly Of Specific Regulatory Lipids And Membrane Fusion Proteins Into The Vertex Ring Domain Of Docked Vacuoles, Rutilio A. Fratti, Youngsoo Jun, Alexey J. Merz, Nathan Margolis, William Wickner

Dartmouth Scholarship

Membrane microdomains are assembled by lipid partitioning (e.g., rafts) or by protein-protein interactions (e.g., coated vesicles). During docking, yeast vacuoles assemble "vertex" ring-shaped microdomains around the periphery of their apposed membranes. Vertices are selectively enriched in the Rab GTPase Ypt7p, the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex (HOPS)-VpsC Rab effector complex, SNAREs, and actin. Membrane fusion initiates at vertex microdomains. We now find that the "regulatory lipids" ergosterol, diacylglycerol and 3- and 4-phosphoinositides accumulate at vertices in a mutually interdependent manner. Regulatory lipids are also required for the vertex enrichment of SNAREs, Ypt7p, and HOPS. Conversely ...


Acetylcholine: Ii. Nicotinic Receptors, Joyce Besheer, Rick A. Bevins Dec 2004

Acetylcholine: Ii. Nicotinic Receptors, Joyce Besheer, Rick A. Bevins

Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology

The nicotinic cholinergic system has been widely implicated in mediating learning and/or memory processes in human and nonhuman animals. This chapter highlights various areas of basic research in which stimulation or blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been shown to affect an animals performance in a variety of tasks thought to measure learning and memory. For example, under certain conditions, stimulation of nAChRs by nicotine (or other nAChRs agonists) can enhance working memory of primates as measured in a delayed matching-to-sample task. Attentional processes are also improved in rats as indexed by a five-choice serial reaction time task ...


Dose-Dependent Effects Of Salmon Calcitonin On Bone Turnover In Ovariectomized Rats., Beatrice H. Owens Dec 2004

Dose-Dependent Effects Of Salmon Calcitonin On Bone Turnover In Ovariectomized Rats., Beatrice H. Owens

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

In the United States, osteoporosis results in about 1.5 million annual fractures, costing approximately $15 billion. Calcitonin is safe and effective in slowing osteoporotic bone loss, but its effect is transient. The current studies were designed to explore the dose-dependent effects of salmon calcitonin on bone turnover in ovariectomized rats and to determine if the decrease in therapeutic effectiveness of calcitonin demonstrated over time with higher doses is due to oversuppression of bone turnover. Doses of 5, 15, & 50 IU/kg BW/day of calcitonin were compared to placebo in 12-week-old ovariectomized and sham-ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats for 24 weeks ...


Degradation Of 23s Rrna In Azithromycin-Treated Ribonuclease Mutants Of Escherichia Coli., Jessica A. Silvers Dec 2004

Degradation Of 23s Rrna In Azithromycin-Treated Ribonuclease Mutants Of Escherichia Coli., Jessica A. Silvers

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Azithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, specifically binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacterial ribosomes and inhibits translation. Azithromycin also prevents 50S ribosomal subunit assembly by binding to a 50S ribosomal subunit precursor particle. When exposed to azithromycin, several ribonucleases in wild-type Escherichia coli cells degrade antibiotic-bound 50S precursor particles. Presumably, cells expressing one or more mutated ribonucleases will degrade the antibiotic-bound precursor less efficiently, resulting in increased sensitivity to the antibiotic. To test this, eight ribonucleaseûdeficient strains of Escherichia coli were grown in the presence or absence of azithromycin. Cell viability, growth rates, and protein synthesis rates were measured. Degradation ...


Role Of Macrophage Apoptosis In Atherosclerosis., June Liu Dec 2004

Role Of Macrophage Apoptosis In Atherosclerosis., June Liu

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The presence of apoptotic cells in atherosclerotic lesions has been broadly reported in the past ten years. The majority of these apoptotic cells are macrophages. However, the pathogenic role of macrophage apoptosis in the development of atherosclerosis remains to be elucidated. Elevated expression of Bax, one of the pivotal pro-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family, has been found in human atherosclerotic plaques. Activation of Bax also occurs in free cholesterol-loaded and oxysterol treated mouse macrophages. In this study, we evaluated the influence of Bax deficiency on apoptosis in macrophage-like P388D1 cells by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to suppress Bax ...


Dietary Carbohydrates And Breast Cancer Risk: A Prospective Study Of The Roles Of Overall Glycemic Index And Glycemic Load, Stephanie A. Navarro Silvera, Meera Jain, Geoffrey R. Howe, Anthony B. Miller, Thomas E. Rohan Dec 2004

Dietary Carbohydrates And Breast Cancer Risk: A Prospective Study Of The Roles Of Overall Glycemic Index And Glycemic Load, Stephanie A. Navarro Silvera, Meera Jain, Geoffrey R. Howe, Anthony B. Miller, Thomas E. Rohan

Department of Public Health Scholarship and Creative Works

We examined breast cancer risk in association with an overall glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and dietary carbohydrate and sugar intake in a prospective cohort of 49,613 Canadian women enrolled in the National Breast Screening Study who completed a self-administered food frequency questionnaire between 1980 and 1985. Linkages to national mortality and cancer databases yielded data on deaths and cancer incidence, with follow-up ending between 1998 and 2000. During a mean follow-up of 16.6 years, we observed 1,461 incident breast cancer cases. GI, GL, total carbohydrate, and total sugar intake were not associated with breast cancer ...


A Naturally Occurring Mutation Of The Opsin Gene (T4r) In Dogs Affects Glycosylation And Stability Of The G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Li Zhu, Geeng-Fu Jang, Beata Jastrzebska, Slawomir Filipek, Susan E. Pearce-Kelling, Gustavo D. Aguirre, Ronald E. Stenkamp, Gregory M. Acland, Krzysztof Palczewski Dec 2004

A Naturally Occurring Mutation Of The Opsin Gene (T4r) In Dogs Affects Glycosylation And Stability Of The G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Li Zhu, Geeng-Fu Jang, Beata Jastrzebska, Slawomir Filipek, Susan E. Pearce-Kelling, Gustavo D. Aguirre, Ronald E. Stenkamp, Gregory M. Acland, Krzysztof Palczewski

Departmental Papers (Vet)

Rho (rhodopsin; opsin plus 11-cis-retinal) is a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor responsible for the capture of a photon in retinal photoreceptor cells. A large number of mutations in the opsin gene associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa have been identified. The naturally occurring T4R opsin mutation in the English mastiff dog leads to a progressive retinal degeneration that closely resembles human retinitis pigmentosa caused by the T4K mutation in the opsin gene. Using genetic approaches and biochemical assays, we explored the properties of the T4R mutant protein. Employing immunoaffinity-purified Rho from affected RHOT4R/T4R dog retina, we ...


Dietary Carbohydrates And Breast Cancer Risk: A Prospective Study Of The Roles Of Overall Glycemic Index And Glycemic Load, Stephanie A. Navarro Silvera, Meera Jain, Geoffrey R. Howe, Anthony B. Miller, Thomas E. Rohan Dec 2004

Dietary Carbohydrates And Breast Cancer Risk: A Prospective Study Of The Roles Of Overall Glycemic Index And Glycemic Load, Stephanie A. Navarro Silvera, Meera Jain, Geoffrey R. Howe, Anthony B. Miller, Thomas E. Rohan

Department of Public Health Scholarship and Creative Works

We examined breast cancer risk in association with overall glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and dietary carbohydrate and sugar intake in a prospective cohort of 49,613 Canadian women enrolled in the National Breast Screening Study who completed a self‐administered food frequency questionnaire between 1980 and 1985. Linkages to national mortality and cancer databases yielded data on deaths and cancer incidence, with follow‐up ending between 1998 and 2000. During a mean follow‐up of 16.6 years, we observed 1,461 incident breast cancer cases. GI, GL, total carbohydrate and total sugar intake were not associated with ...


Access To Care: A Hospice Model Of Access To Care For The Homeless, Mary Ann Bridget Kinney Dec 2004

Access To Care: A Hospice Model Of Access To Care For The Homeless, Mary Ann Bridget Kinney

Theses and Graduate Projects

Access to Hospice for the terminally ill patient is a monumental problem for the disenfranchised person. According to the National Coalition for the Homeless (NCH) in Washington D.C. there is an estimate of 3.5 million people who experience homelessness in a year (2003). The homeless face many health care service gaps including the vital service of end- of- life nursing care, which allows for death with dignity. The following paper will discuss the author's experience with the homeless, the need of access to Hospice Care for the homeless, and a review of literature regarding access to Hospice ...


Estimating Percentile-Specific Causal Effects: A Case Study Of Micronutrient Supplementation, Birth Weight, And Infant Mortality, Francesca Dominici, Scott L. Zeger, Giovanni Parmigiani, Joanne Katz, Parul Christian Dec 2004

Estimating Percentile-Specific Causal Effects: A Case Study Of Micronutrient Supplementation, Birth Weight, And Infant Mortality, Francesca Dominici, Scott L. Zeger, Giovanni Parmigiani, Joanne Katz, Parul Christian

Johns Hopkins University, Dept. of Biostatistics Working Papers

In developing countries, higher infant mortality is partially caused by poor maternal and fetal nutrition. Clinical trials of micronutrient supplementation are aimed at reducing the risk of infant mortality by increasing birth weight. Because infant mortality is greatest among the low birth weight infants (LBW) (• 2500 grams), an effective intervention may need to increase the birth weight among the smallest babies. Although it has been demonstrated that supplementation increases the birth weight in a trial conducted in Nepal, there is inconclusive evidence that the supplementation improves their survival. It has been hypothesized that a potential benefit of the treatment on ...


A Hybrid Newton-Type Method For The Linear Regression In Case-Cohort Studies, Menggang Yu, Bin Nan Dec 2004

A Hybrid Newton-Type Method For The Linear Regression In Case-Cohort Studies, Menggang Yu, Bin Nan

The University of Michigan Department of Biostatistics Working Paper Series

Case-cohort designs are increasingly commonly used in large epidemiological cohort studies. Nan, Yu, and Kalbeisch (2004) provided the asymptotic results for censored linear regression models in case-cohort studies. In this article, we consider computational aspects of their proposed rank based estimating methods. We show that the rank based discontinuous estimating functions for case-cohort studies are monotone, a property established for cohort data in the literature, when generalized Gehan type of weights are used. Though the estimating problem can be formulated to a linear programming problem as that for cohort data, due to its easily uncontrollable large scale even for a ...


Expression Of Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels (Girks) And Beta-Adrenergic Regulation Of Breast Cancer Cell Lines, Howard K. Plummer, Qiang Yu, Yavuz Cakir, Hildegard M. Schuller Dec 2004

Expression Of Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels (Girks) And Beta-Adrenergic Regulation Of Breast Cancer Cell Lines, Howard K. Plummer, Qiang Yu, Yavuz Cakir, Hildegard M. Schuller

Faculty Publications and Other Works -- General Biology

Background

Previous research has indicated that at various organ sites there is a subset of adenocarcinomas that is regulated by beta-adrenergic and arachidonic acid-mediated signal transduction pathways. We wished to determine if this regulation exists in breast adenocarcinomas. Expression of mRNA that encodes a G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1) has been shown in tissue samples from approximately 40% of primary human breast cancers. Previously, GIRK channels have been associated with beta-adrenergic signaling.

Methods

Breast cancer cell lines were screened for GIRK channels by RT-PCR. Cell cultures of breast cancer cells were treated with beta-adrenergic agonists and antagonists, and ...


Nursing Students' Self-Efficacy And Attitude: Examining The Influence Ofthe Omaha System In Nurse Managed Centers, Cherie Mooy Dec 2004

Nursing Students' Self-Efficacy And Attitude: Examining The Influence Ofthe Omaha System In Nurse Managed Centers, Cherie Mooy

Master's Projects

Self-efficacy, or confidence, as an outcome behavior has been identified as influencing nursing job satisfaction and retention. Clinical learning environments and teaching strategies that build and support perceived self-efficacy are critical aspects of preparing new nurses for their entry and continuing role as professional nurses in today's information-intensive data-management healthcare environment. The purpose of this pre-test post-test study is to measure, using the C-scale (Grundy, 1992), nursing students' self-efficacy to perform patient assessment in Nurse Managed Centers (NMC) after one semester of using the Omaha System documentation framework. Nursing students' attitudes of preparation for using Standardized Nursing Languages (SNL ...


Haplotype Analysis Of Common Variants In The Brca1 Gene And Risk Of Sporadic Breast Cancer, David G. Cox, Peter Kraft, Susan E. Hankinson, David J. Hunter Dec 2004

Haplotype Analysis Of Common Variants In The Brca1 Gene And Risk Of Sporadic Breast Cancer, David G. Cox, Peter Kraft, Susan E. Hankinson, David J. Hunter

Susan E. Hankinson

Introduction Truncation mutations in the BRCA1 gene cause a substantial increase in risk of breast cancer. However, these mutations are rare in the general population and account for little of the overall incidence of sporadic breast cancer. Method We used whole-gene resequencing data to select haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms, and examined the association between common haplotypes of BRCA1 and breast cancer in a nested case-control study in the Nurses' Health Study (1323 cases and 1910 controls). Results One haplotype was associated with a slight increase in risk (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.37). A ...


Animal Health Matters, David H. Zeman Dec 2004

Animal Health Matters, David H. Zeman

Animal Health MATTERS Newsletter

Head/Director's Message [Page] 1- ADRDL invited to join the NAHLN Diagnostic News [Page] 1- Bovine genital trichomoniasis in western SD [Page] 2- Testing milk for mastitis at ADRDL [Page] 2- Poultry biosecurity [Page] 2- Veterinary poultry specialists sought Research News [Page] 2- VSD/ADRDL professor receives grant to establish research center Extension News [Page] 3- Are white tail deer a threat for spreading BVDV in cattle? [Page] 3- Liver copper concentration in calves [Page] 4- Calendar of events [Page] 4- Holiday hours


Public Health Nursing Acceptance Of The 5 A’S Protocol For Prenatal Smoking Cessation, Jihong Liu Dec 2004

Public Health Nursing Acceptance Of The 5 A’S Protocol For Prenatal Smoking Cessation, Jihong Liu

Faculty Publications

Oregon’s efforts in tobacco cessation have historically focused on the general population and have depended on quit line services as the primary intervention. The Oregon Smoke Free Mothers and Babies Program (SFMB) was developed in 2002 to focus on public health nurses and prenatal care providers who work with high risk pregnant women. It seeks to increase smoking cessation among low income and other high risk pregnant women by disseminating the U.S. Public Health Service best practices, the 5 A’s (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, Arrange) tobacco brief intervention protocol, to public health nurses and prenatal care providers ...


Investigation Of The Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene And Cholesterol As A Risk Factor For Migraine, R. Curtain, R. Lea, S. Quinlan, C. Bellis, L. Tajouri, R. Hughes, J. Macmillan, L. Griffiths Dec 2004

Investigation Of The Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene And Cholesterol As A Risk Factor For Migraine, R. Curtain, R. Lea, S. Quinlan, C. Bellis, L. Tajouri, R. Hughes, J. Macmillan, L. Griffiths

Lotti Tajouri

The Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) gene is a cell surface receptor that plays an important role in cholesterol homeostasis. We investigated the (TA)n polymorphism in exon 18 of the LDLR gene on chromosome 19p13.2 performing an association analysis in 244 typical migraine-affected patients, 151 suffering from migraine with aura (MA), 96 with migraine without aura (MO) and 244 unaffected controls. The populations consisted of Caucasians only, and controls were age- and sex-matched. The results showed no significant difference between groups for allele frequency distributions of the (TA)n polymorphism even after separation of the migraine-affected individuals into subgroups ...