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Medicine and Health Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Australian Catholic University

Skeletal muscle

2016

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Medicine and Health Sciences

Presleep Protein Ingestion Does Not Compromise The Muscle Protein Synthetic Response To Protein Ingested The Following Morning [Accepted Manuscript], Benjamin T. Wall, Nicholas A. Burd, Rinske Franssen, Stefan H. M. Gorissen, Tim Snijders, Joan M. Senden, Annemie P. Gijsen, Luc Van Loon Jan 2016

Presleep Protein Ingestion Does Not Compromise The Muscle Protein Synthetic Response To Protein Ingested The Following Morning [Accepted Manuscript], Benjamin T. Wall, Nicholas A. Burd, Rinske Franssen, Stefan H. M. Gorissen, Tim Snijders, Joan M. Senden, Annemie P. Gijsen, Luc Van Loon

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Protein ingestion before sleep augments postexercise muscle protein synthesis during overnight recovery. It is unknown whether postexercise and presleep protein consumption modulates postprandial protein handling and myofibrillar protein synthetic responses the following morning. Sixteen healthy young ( 24 ± 1 yr ) men performed unilateral resistance-type exercise ( contralateral leg acting as a resting control ) at 2000. Participants ingested 20 g of protein immediately after exercise plus 60 g of protein presleep ( PRO group; n = 8 ) or equivalent boluses of carbohydrate ( CON; n = 8 ). The subsequent morning participants received primed, continuous infusions of l-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and l-[1-13C]leucine combined with ingestion of ...


Muscle Fibre Capillarization Is A Critical Factor In Muscle Fibre Hypertrophy During Resistance Exercise Training In Older Men, Tim Snijders, Joshua P. Nederveen, Sophie Joanisse, Marika Leenders, Lex B. Verdijk, Luc J. C. Van Loon, Gianni Parise Jan 2016

Muscle Fibre Capillarization Is A Critical Factor In Muscle Fibre Hypertrophy During Resistance Exercise Training In Older Men, Tim Snijders, Joshua P. Nederveen, Sophie Joanisse, Marika Leenders, Lex B. Verdijk, Luc J. C. Van Loon, Gianni Parise

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Background Adequate muscle fibre perfusion is critical for the maintenance of muscle mass, it is essential in the rapid delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to the muscle, stimulating muscle fibre growth. Muscle fibre capillarization is known to decrease substantially with advancing age. However, whether (relative) low muscle fibre capillarization negatively impacts the muscle hypertrophic response following resistance exercise training in older adults is unknown. Methods Twenty-two healthy older men (71 ± 1 years) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance type exercise training. To assess the change in muscle fibre characteristics, percutaneous biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken ...


Architectural Adaptations Of Muscle To Training And Injury: A Narrative Review Outlining The Contributions By Fascicle Length, Pennation Angle And Muscle Thickness [Accepted Manuscript], Ryan G. Timmins, Anthony J. Shield, Morgan D. Williams, Christian Lorenzen, David Opar Jan 2016

Architectural Adaptations Of Muscle To Training And Injury: A Narrative Review Outlining The Contributions By Fascicle Length, Pennation Angle And Muscle Thickness [Accepted Manuscript], Ryan G. Timmins, Anthony J. Shield, Morgan D. Williams, Christian Lorenzen, David Opar

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Background: The architectural characteristics of muscle (fascicle length, pennation angle muscle thickness) respond to varying forms of stimuli ( eg, training, immobilisation and injury ). Architectural changes following injury are thought to occur in response to the restricted range of motion experienced during rehabilitation and the associated neuromuscular inhibition. However, it is unknown if these differences exist prior to injury, and had a role in injury occuring ( prospectively ), or if they occur in response to the incident itself ( retrospectively ). Considering that the structure of a muscle will influence how it functions, it is of interest to understand how these architectural variations may ...


May Bed Rest Cause Greater Muscle Loss Than Limb Immobilization? [Accepted Manuscript], Marlou L. Dirks, E. M. P. Backx, Benjamin T. Wall, Lex B. Verdijk, Luc Van Loon Jan 2016

May Bed Rest Cause Greater Muscle Loss Than Limb Immobilization? [Accepted Manuscript], Marlou L. Dirks, E. M. P. Backx, Benjamin T. Wall, Lex B. Verdijk, Luc Van Loon

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Bed rest, as often occurs following surgery or during (critical) illness, may result in greater muscle loss than local muscle disuse, not only because of the amount of muscle tissue that is subjected to disuse, but also because of various systemic factors that may accelerate muscle atrophy. These factors could include hormonal changes or (low-grade) systemic inflammation. In medical research, experimental (whole-body) bed rest and (local) limb immobilization are typically applied in healthy volunteers to investigate the impact of disuse on the loss of muscle mass and strength. Previous work, based on combined results of separate studies, has suggested that ...