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Australian Catholic University

Skeletal muscle

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Full-Text Articles in Medicine and Health Sciences

Exercise And Glut4 In Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue, Marcelo Flores-Opazo, Eva Boland, Andrew Garnham, Robyn M. Murphy, Sean L. Mcgee, Mark Hargreaves Jan 2018

Exercise And Glut4 In Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue, Marcelo Flores-Opazo, Eva Boland, Andrew Garnham, Robyn M. Murphy, Sean L. Mcgee, Mark Hargreaves

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

To examine the effect of acute and chronic exercise on adipose tissue GLUT4 expression, a total of 20 healthy, male subjects performed one of two studies. Ten subjects performed cycle ergometer exercise for 60 min at 73 ± 2% VO2 peak and abdominal adipose tissue samples were obtained immediately before and after exercise and after 3 h of recovery. Another 10 subjects completed 10 days of exercise training, comprising a combination of six sessions of 60 min at 75% VO2 peak and four sessions of 6 × 5 min at 90% VO2 peak, separated by 3 min at 40% VO2 peak. Abdominal ...


Architectural Adaptations Of Muscle To Training And Injury: A Narrative Review Outlining The Contributions By Fascicle Length, Pennation Angle And Muscle Thickness [Accepted Manuscript], Ryan G. Timmins, Anthony J. Shield, Morgan D. Williams, Christian Lorenzen, David Opar Jan 2016

Architectural Adaptations Of Muscle To Training And Injury: A Narrative Review Outlining The Contributions By Fascicle Length, Pennation Angle And Muscle Thickness [Accepted Manuscript], Ryan G. Timmins, Anthony J. Shield, Morgan D. Williams, Christian Lorenzen, David Opar

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Background: The architectural characteristics of muscle (fascicle length, pennation angle muscle thickness) respond to varying forms of stimuli ( eg, training, immobilisation and injury ). Architectural changes following injury are thought to occur in response to the restricted range of motion experienced during rehabilitation and the associated neuromuscular inhibition. However, it is unknown if these differences exist prior to injury, and had a role in injury occuring ( prospectively ), or if they occur in response to the incident itself ( retrospectively ). Considering that the structure of a muscle will influence how it functions, it is of interest to understand how these architectural variations may ...


Post-Exercise Protein Synthesis Rates Are Only Marginally Higher In Type I Compared With Type Ii Muscle Fibres Following Resistance-Type Exercise, René Koopman, Benjamin G. Gleeson, Annemie P. Gijsen, Bart B. L. Groen, Joan M. G. Senden, Michael J. Rennie, Luc J. C. Van Loon Jan 2011

Post-Exercise Protein Synthesis Rates Are Only Marginally Higher In Type I Compared With Type Ii Muscle Fibres Following Resistance-Type Exercise, René Koopman, Benjamin G. Gleeson, Annemie P. Gijsen, Bart B. L. Groen, Joan M. G. Senden, Michael J. Rennie, Luc J. C. Van Loon

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

We examined the effect of an acute bout of resistance exercise on fractional muscle protein synthesis rates in human type I and type II muscle fibres. After a standardised breakfast (31 ± 1 kJ kg−1 body weight, consisting of 52 Energy% (En%) carbohydrate, 34 En% protein and 14 En% fat), 9 untrained men completed a lower-limb resistance exercise bout (8 sets of 10 repetitions leg press and leg extension at 70% 1RM). A primed, continuous infusion of l-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine was combined with muscle biopsies collected from both legs immediately after exercise and after 6 h of post-exercise recovery. Single ...