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Pathogenic Microbiology Commons

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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Pathogenic Microbiology

The Effects Of Quorum Sensing And Temperature On The Soluble Proteome Of Vibrio Salmonicida, Christopher L. Massey Jun 2016

The Effects Of Quorum Sensing And Temperature On The Soluble Proteome Of Vibrio Salmonicida, Christopher L. Massey

Master's Theses and Project Reports

Vibrio salmonicida causes cold-water vibriosis in salmon populations around the world and causes financial damage to fisheries designed to farm these salmon. Very little is known about the physiology of how V. salmonicida causes disease and measures to contain vibriosis are restricted to either vaccinating individual fish against disease or administering antibiotics when an outbreak is detected. These procedures are costly and increase the risk for selection of antibiotic-resistant V. salmonicida strains. A recent reoccurrence of outbreaks in Norwegian fisheries provided incentive to better understand the virulence mechanisms of V. salmonicida. In this thesis, a proteomic approach was used to ...


The Shellfish Corner -- Vibrios And Shellfish, Michael Rice May 2015

The Shellfish Corner -- Vibrios And Shellfish, Michael Rice

Michael A Rice

Pathogenic Vibrios are becoming an increasing problem for shellfish producers in North America and elsewhere. This paper reviews current research into the pathogenic nature of Vibrios and provides some practical advice for avoiding the propagation of Vibrios on shellfish farms nd in wild harvest molluscan shellfish.


Investigating The Interactions Between Cyanobacteria And Vibrio Parahaemolyticus, Caroline E. Ward Jan 2014

Investigating The Interactions Between Cyanobacteria And Vibrio Parahaemolyticus, Caroline E. Ward

Honors Theses and Capstones

One well-known pathogen that has been the topic of many recent studies is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which causes thousands of foodborne illnesses a year, mostly from the ingestion of raw or undercooked oysters. It has been shown cyanobacteria can act as a long-term reservoir of Vibrio cholerae, another pathogenic Vibrio, by encasing the cells within mucilaginous sheaths during which Vibrios enter a viable but non-culturable state. In this study we investigated the interaction of V. parahaemolyticus with cyanobacteria to determine whether cyanobacteria aid in the longevity and survival of V. parahaemolyticus. We found that non-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strain G445 was able ...


North Atlantic Vibrio Vulnificus Surveillance From Postharvest Oysters At A Us Shellfish Processing Facility, Kenneth Lavalley, Joseph Dealteris, Michael Rice, Marta Gomez-Chiarri Dec 2013

North Atlantic Vibrio Vulnificus Surveillance From Postharvest Oysters At A Us Shellfish Processing Facility, Kenneth Lavalley, Joseph Dealteris, Michael Rice, Marta Gomez-Chiarri

Marta Gomez-Chiarri

Postharvest surveillance for Vibrio vulnificus by a commercial processing facility was conducted from May 2001 to September 2003. Harvest areas included the Delaware Bay, Long Island Sound and Prince Edward Island. Occurrence followed a seasonal distribution. Low densities were observed in June, increased through August, and became rare by September. Given the ubiquitous nature of marine Vibrios, it was not surprising to find V. vulnificus everywhere, which was investigated. Observations confirmed the importance of strict time/temperature and product handling practices by shellfish harvesters, dealers and processors. Mishandling led to a potentially dangerous and uncharacteristically high V. vulnificus observation.


North Atlantic Vibrio Vulnificus Surveillance From Postharvest Oysters At A Us Shellfish Processing Facility, Kenneth Lavalley, Joseph Dealteris, Michael Rice, Marta Gomez-Chiarri Jun 2008

North Atlantic Vibrio Vulnificus Surveillance From Postharvest Oysters At A Us Shellfish Processing Facility, Kenneth Lavalley, Joseph Dealteris, Michael Rice, Marta Gomez-Chiarri

Michael A Rice

Postharvest surveillance for Vibrio vulnificus by a commercial processing facility was conducted from May 2001 to September 2003. Harvest areas included the Delaware Bay, Long Island Sound and Prince Edward Island. Occurrence followed a seasonal distribution. Low densities were observed in June, increased through August, and became rare by September. Given the ubiquitous nature of marine Vibrios, it was not surprising to find V. vulnificus everywhere, which was investigated. Observations confirmed the importance of strict time/temperature and product handling practices by shellfish harvesters, dealers and processors. Mishandling led to a potentially dangerous and uncharacteristically high V. vulnificus observation.