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Pathogenic Microbiology Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Pathogenic Microbiology

Colonization Of Intestinal Pathogen Changes The Gut Microbiota, Kaitlyn Shondelmyer Apr 2014

Colonization Of Intestinal Pathogen Changes The Gut Microbiota, Kaitlyn Shondelmyer

Senior Honors Theses

Enterohemorrhagic Escherechia coli is a serious human pathogen causing bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome. It is difficult to study in animal models, but pathogenesis may be modeled in mice with the similar murine pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium. C. rodentium does not cause disease in streptomycin-treated mice, suggesting that it is competition with other facultative anaerobes that triggers pathogenesis. Streptomycin-treated mice were co-colonized with C. rodentium and a commensal E. coli strain. The intestinal microbiota of each group was observed over a 15-day period using quantitative PCR. Colon weights were also measured over the same period. Results indicate that the disease ...


Biology And Pathogenesis Of Acanthamoeba., Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui, Naveed Ahmed Khan Jan 2012

Biology And Pathogenesis Of Acanthamoeba., Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui, Naveed Ahmed Khan

Department of Biological & Biomedical Sciences

Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens.


An Ecotypic Differentiation Of Human And Bovine Fecal Streptococci, With Application To Human Pollution In The Yakima River, Harlen Harvey Johnson Dec 1968

An Ecotypic Differentiation Of Human And Bovine Fecal Streptococci, With Application To Human Pollution In The Yakima River, Harlen Harvey Johnson

All Master's Theses

It was the purpose of this study to report on the development of a technique for distinguishing human fecal streptococci from bovine fecal streptococci, and to make application of this technique in describing some of the sources of pollution in the Yakima River as contributed by the Wilson Creek drainage system, in the Ellensburg area of Washington.