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Pathogenic Microbiology Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Pathogenic Microbiology

Methods Of Testing Skin Mucosomes Of Anaxyrus Boreas In The Face Of Batrachocytrium Dendrobatidis, Gena Rumsey Jan 2019

Methods Of Testing Skin Mucosomes Of Anaxyrus Boreas In The Face Of Batrachocytrium Dendrobatidis, Gena Rumsey

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The microbial community of amphibians skin has demonstrated significant importance in amphibian health and disease resistance specifically in response to the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd; Barnhart et al. 2017). Since its discovery in the late 1990s, Bd has contributed to world-wide decline in amphibian populations. Multiple naturally occurring amphibian-skin bacteria have been identified as inhibitors of Bd, including Janthinobacterium lividum (J liv; Harris et al. 2009). The McKenzie group developed a probiotic treatment of J liv as an intervention for a boreal toad population in Colorado drastically declining due to a Bd epidemic. Since wild toads cannot be ...


The Acid Response In Helicobacter Pylori Via The Two Component System Arsrs, Jiajia Chen May 2018

The Acid Response In Helicobacter Pylori Via The Two Component System Arsrs, Jiajia Chen

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the mucosal layer of the human stomach. Today, nearly half of the world population is infected with H. pylori. This infection leads to chronic inflammation, and potentially peptic ulcer disease, or gastric cancer. Developing therapeutics based on the colonization mechanism of this bacterium holds great promise as a therapeutic paradigm to promote human gastric health. To adapt to the hostile acidic environment in human stomach, H. pylori utilizes a Two-Component Signal Transduction system (TCS), ArsRS, to mediate the expression of acid response genes, such as the adhesin gene sabA and the urease ...


The Unusual Paradigm Of The Acid Response Two Component System Of Helicobacter Pylori, Anna Kenan May 2018

The Unusual Paradigm Of The Acid Response Two Component System Of Helicobacter Pylori, Anna Kenan

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Two component signal transduction systems in bacteria are key for environmental adaptation. Signaling via these systems is traditionally considered to be relatively simple, only involving interactions between the sensory protein and its cognate response regulator. The ArsRS two component system is vital for the acid response in Helicobacter pylori. This study investigates the mechanism by which ArsRS responds to acid in H pylori. Recent studies in our lab have challenged the the classic model in which the response regulator ArsR is activated by the phosphorylation of a conserved aspartic acid by the transfer of a phosphoryl group from a histidine ...


Determination Of The Effects That A Previously Uncharacterized Secreted Product From Klebsiella Pneumoniae Has On Citrobacter Freundii And Enterobacter Cloacae Biofilms, Cody M. Hastings May 2017

Determination Of The Effects That A Previously Uncharacterized Secreted Product From Klebsiella Pneumoniae Has On Citrobacter Freundii And Enterobacter Cloacae Biofilms, Cody M. Hastings

Undergraduate Honors Theses

More so than ever, Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) bacteria are on the rise due to overuse of antibiotics along with natural selection for adaptations that enhance drug-resistant properties. One particular bacterial family, Enterobacteriaceae, has been problematic, exhibiting several bacterial members that have developed a precipitous resistance to modern antibiotics and are also primary causative agents of nosocomial, or hospital acquired, infections. Citrobacter freundii (CF) and Enterobacter cloacae (ECL) are two species of the Enterobacteriaceae family causing significant medical concern due to their role in producing numerous opportunistic infections such as bacteremia, lower respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and endocarditis ...


An Analysis Of Outer Inflammatory Protein A In Cag Pathogenicity Island Negative And Positive Strains Of Helicobacter Pylori, Danielle N. Horridge Apr 2017

An Analysis Of Outer Inflammatory Protein A In Cag Pathogenicity Island Negative And Positive Strains Of Helicobacter Pylori, Danielle N. Horridge

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Outer inflammatory protein A (OipA) is an outer membrane protein virulence factor of the bacterial gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori. oipA gene expression is regulated by phase variation at a CT dinucleotide repeat located within the 5’ end of the gene, such that the gene is alternatively in-frame (phase on) or out-of-frame (phase off). OipA has been shown to play a role in inflammation and as an adhesin that assists in the attachment of H. pylori to host cells. H. pylori isolates lacking the cag Pathogenicity Island (cagPAI negative), the primary virulence determinant of H. pylori, induce less host inflammation ...


Bathing In Bacteria: Mycobacteria Relative Abundance On Showerhead Biofilms, Robin G. Hacker-Cary Jan 2017

Bathing In Bacteria: Mycobacteria Relative Abundance On Showerhead Biofilms, Robin G. Hacker-Cary

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Mycobacterium is a genus of Actinobacteria that contains many human pathogens, causing diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung disease. Diagnosed cases of NTM lung disease, are increasing rapidly across the United States. Recent studies have indicated that this respiratory infection is acquired through the inhalation of aerosolized mycobacteria derived from the biofilms found on the inside of household showerheads.

To asses the factors that influence mycobacteria abundance on the interior biofilms of showerheads we analyzed bacterial and protistan communities from showerhead samples gathered across the United States. Further, we investigated water chemistry, specifically total chorine concentration ...


Mechanisms Of Helicobacter Pylori Adhesion Regulation And Impacts On Host Immune Response, Catherine Rose Acio May 2016

Mechanisms Of Helicobacter Pylori Adhesion Regulation And Impacts On Host Immune Response, Catherine Rose Acio

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosal layer of 50% of the world’s population. H. pylori utilizes a variety of adhesin proteins to adhere to the gastric epithelial layer, allowing the bacterium to successfully colonize its host, gain access to nutrients, and persist even during gastric mucosal shedding. The present study investigates transcriptional regulation of adhesin-encoding genes sabA and hopZ in the H. pylori strain J99. Several adhesin-encoding genes, including sabA and hopZ, possess a repeating homopolymeric nucleotide tract within their promoter region and a poly-cytosine-thymine (poly-CT) tract downstream of the translational start site ...


Characterization Of Novel Compounds That Inhibit Intracellular Salmonella Growth, Madeline Edwards Jan 2016

Characterization Of Novel Compounds That Inhibit Intracellular Salmonella Growth, Madeline Edwards

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Although instances of antibiotic resistance are steadily rising, traditional screening platforms have stopped producing novel antibiotics. The combination of these two events has led to fear that we may enter a post-antibiotic era, where common infections will no longer be treatable. In order to combat this issue, Abigail Reens and Amy Crooks in our lab carried out a high-throughput screen that identifies compounds that prevent bacterial growth in mammalian cells instead of in laboratory media. They screened a library of 14,400 drug-like compounds for activity against Salmonella enterica growing within macrophages. Of 286 chemicals with antibacterial activity, I found ...


Effects Of Carbon Quantity And Plant Diversity On Pathogen Suppression By Soil-Borne Streptomyces, Nuttapon Pombubpa Jan 2015

Effects Of Carbon Quantity And Plant Diversity On Pathogen Suppression By Soil-Borne Streptomyces, Nuttapon Pombubpa

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Members of the genus Streptomyces are some of the best candidates for biological control of soil-borne pathogenic bacteria. Antibiotic production by Streptomyces is thought to be crucial for this strain’s ability to compete with other closely related soil microorganisms. Furthermore, Streptomyces is able to not only inhibit the growth of its competitors, but also that of many soil-borne plant pathogens. My thesis assessed Streptomyces performance under varying levels of soil resources (carbon componds that serve as energy sources) and in plots with varying degrees of plant diversity that, in turn, affects soil resources. This project aims to deconvolute the ...


Polymorphic Membrane Protein Expression In Chlamydia/Hsv Co-Infected Cells, Julia S. Colgrove May 2014

Polymorphic Membrane Protein Expression In Chlamydia/Hsv Co-Infected Cells, Julia S. Colgrove

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Chlamydiaceae are a bacterial family that contains a single genus: Chlamydia. The genus Chlamydia consists of 9 species that are obligate, intracellular pathogens. Untreated C. trachomatis infections can lead to serious health ramifications, such as ectopic pregnancy, tubal factor infertility, pelvic inflammatory disease, and long-term pelvic pain. In this study, it was found that a primary antibody dilution of 1:400 using methanol fixed HeLA cells, as derived from Carrasco, et al. protocol, was only optimal for PMP-C staining. Pmp-A, Pmp-B, and Pmp-F were found to stain brighter with formaldehyde fixed, infected HeLa cells and using different primary antibody ...