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Full-Text Articles in Molecular Biology

Regulation Of Nachrs And Stemness By Nicotine And E-Cigarettes In Nsclc, Courtney Schaal Aug 2016

Regulation Of Nachrs And Stemness By Nicotine And E-Cigarettes In Nsclc, Courtney Schaal

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women, nationally and internationally and kills more people each year than breast, prostate, and colon cancers combined. Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is the most common histological subtype of lung cancer, and accounts for 85% of all cases. Cigarette smoking is the single greatest risk factor for lung cancer, and is correlated with 80-90% of all lung cancer deaths. Nicotine, the addictive component of tobacco smoke, is not a carcinogen and cannot initiate tumors itself; however, it is known to act as a tumor promoter, by enhancing ...


Cell Cycle Arrest By Tgfß1 Is Dependent On The Inhibition Of Cmg Helicase Assembly And Activation, Brook Samuel Nepon-Sixt Jun 2016

Cell Cycle Arrest By Tgfß1 Is Dependent On The Inhibition Of Cmg Helicase Assembly And Activation, Brook Samuel Nepon-Sixt

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Tumorigenesis is a multifaceted set of events consisting of the deregulation of several cell-autonomous and tissue microenvironmental processes that ultimately leads to the acquisition of malignant disease. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFß) and its family members are regulatory cytokines that function to ensure proper organismal development and the maintenance of homeostasis by controlling cellular differentiation, proliferation, adhesion, and survival, as well as by modulating components of the cellular microenvironment and immune system. The pleiotropic control by TGFß of these cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is intimately linked to the prevention of tumor formation, the specifics of which are dependent on ...


Cmg Helicase Assembly And Activation: Regulation By C-Myc Through Chromatin Decondensation And Novel Therapeutic Avenues For Cancer Treatment, Victoria Bryant Jun 2016

Cmg Helicase Assembly And Activation: Regulation By C-Myc Through Chromatin Decondensation And Novel Therapeutic Avenues For Cancer Treatment, Victoria Bryant

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The CMG (Cdc45, MCM, GINS) helicase is required for cellular proliferation and functions to unwind double-stranded DNA to allow the replication machinery to duplicate the genome. Cancer cells mismanage helicase activation through a variety of mechanisms, leading to the potential for the development of novel anti-cancer treatments. Mammalian cells load an excess of MCM complexes that act as reserves for new replication origins to be created when replication forks stall due to stress conditions, such as drug treatment. Targeting the helicase through inhibition of the MCM complex has sensitized cancer cells to drugs that inhibit DNA replication, such as aphidicolin ...


Nonreplicative Dna Helicases Involved In Maintaining Genome Stability, Salahuddin Syed Apr 2016

Nonreplicative Dna Helicases Involved In Maintaining Genome Stability, Salahuddin Syed

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Double-strand breaks and stalled forks arise when the replication machinery encounters damage from exogenous sources like DNA damaging agents or ionizing radiation, and require specific DNA helicases to resolve these structures. Sgs1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases and has a role in DNA repair and recombination. The RecQ family includes human genes BLM, WRN, RECQL4, RECQL1, and RECQL5. Mutations in BLM, WRN, and RECQL4 result in genetic disorders characterized by developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to cancer. All RecQ helicases have common features including a helicase domain, an RQC domain, and a ...


Analysis Of The Induction Of Autophagy During Er Stress And The Vesicle Fusion Machinery At The Trans-Golgi Network In Arabidopsis Thaliana, Xiaochen Yang Jan 2016

Analysis Of The Induction Of Autophagy During Er Stress And The Vesicle Fusion Machinery At The Trans-Golgi Network In Arabidopsis Thaliana, Xiaochen Yang

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The vacuole in plant cells occupies more than 80% of the cellular volume and is involved in development, detoxification, and degradation of proteins. In this dissertation, I focused on the two vesicle trafficking pathways, autophagy and vacuolar trafficking, which deliver cellular components to the vacuole.

Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in eukaryotic cells for degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic materials and damaged cell components during development or upon encountering stress conditions. Previous studies showed that autophagy is activated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and delivers ER fragments to the vacuole. ER stress is defined as accumulation of unfolded or ...


Prokineticin-2: A Novel Anti-Apoptotic And Anti-Inflammatory Signaling Protein In Parkinson’S Disease, Matthew Neal Jan 2016

Prokineticin-2: A Novel Anti-Apoptotic And Anti-Inflammatory Signaling Protein In Parkinson’S Disease, Matthew Neal

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The mechanisms behind the development and progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are still not fully understood. Several pathophysiological mechanisms have been implicated in the progression of the disease including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, protein aggregation, and neuroinflammation. Since current therapeutic options for PD treat only the symptoms without influencing disease progression, recent translational studies have focused on identifying factors that protect against putative pathophysiological mechanisms of PD. We show herein, that the chemokine-like signaling protein, Prokineticin-2 (PK2), is expressed and secreted at higher levels in dopaminergic neurons during the acute phase of inflammatory or neurotoxic stress. Furthermore, we ...