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Wayne State University Dissertations

Heterochromatin

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Full-Text Articles in Molecular Biology

Sex And Heterochromatin: An Investigation Of Sexual Dimorphism In Drosophila Melanogaster, Manasi S. Apte Jan 2014

Sex And Heterochromatin: An Investigation Of Sexual Dimorphism In Drosophila Melanogaster, Manasi S. Apte

Wayne State University Dissertations

Over 30% of Drosophila genome is assembled into heterochromatin. Heterochromatin is relatively gene poor, transcriptionally less active and remains condensed during interphase. Previous studies established that roX RNA and some of the Male Specific Lethal (MSL) proteins, all components of the dosage compensation complex, are required for full expression of autosomal heterochromatic genes in male flies but not in females. This was surprising since heterochromatin is generally not thought to be sexually dimorphic. The genetic basis for the regulation of sex-specific heterochromatin was completely unknown.

To determine if roX RNAs localize directly at the heterochromatic regions that they regulate, I ...


The Mechanism Of Regulation Of Autosomal Heterochromatic Genes In Drosophila Melanogaster Males By Rox Rna And Msl Proteins, Satya Kiran Koya Jan 2014

The Mechanism Of Regulation Of Autosomal Heterochromatic Genes In Drosophila Melanogaster Males By Rox Rna And Msl Proteins, Satya Kiran Koya

Wayne State University Dissertations

In humans and flies, males and females have different set of sex chromosomes contributing to different levels of X-linked gene expression. To equalize X-linked gene dosage between sexes, both humans and flies developed independent strategies which are called dosage compensation. Human females randomly inactivate one of their X chromosome into barr body and Drosophila males up regulate their single X chromosome two fold. Both strategies equalize of X linked gene dose between sexes.

In Drosophila, dosage compensation is brought about by the ribonucleoprotein Male Specific Lethal (MSL) complex that binds hundreds of sites along the X chromosome and modifies chromatin ...