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Full-Text Articles in Molecular Biology

Developmental Regulation Of Strongyloides Stercoralis Infectious Third-Stage Larvae By Canonical Dauer Pathways, Jonathan David Chaffee Stoltzfus Jan 2013

Developmental Regulation Of Strongyloides Stercoralis Infectious Third-Stage Larvae By Canonical Dauer Pathways, Jonathan David Chaffee Stoltzfus

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Parasitic nematodes inflict a vast global disease burden in humans as well as animals and plants of agricultural importance; understanding how these worms infect their hosts has significant health and economic implications. In humans, soil-transmitted parasitic nematodes cause hookworm disease and strongyloidiasis, and vector-transmitted parasitic nematodes cause filariasis. The infectious form of the species causing these diseases is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i). Molecular mechanisms governing L3i developmental arrest and activation within a host have been poorly understood. An analogous developmentally arrested third-stage larva--the dauer larva--forms during stressful environmental conditions in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and is controlled ...


Host-Apicomplexan Parasite Interactions: Leveraging Biological Discovery Into Antiparasitic Drug Development, Melanie Grace Millholland Jan 2013

Host-Apicomplexan Parasite Interactions: Leveraging Biological Discovery Into Antiparasitic Drug Development, Melanie Grace Millholland

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

The obligate intracellular pathogens Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii remodel their host cell to facilitate their intracellular development and progress through their asexual life cycle, a virulent lytic cycle responsible for parasite-mediated pathogenesis. While several studies have highlighted parasite proteins that interact with the host cell during this cycle, host proteins exploited by the parasite for successful growth and conversely, host molecules evolutionarily tuned to control parasite infection remain unclear. We addressed this question from both sides of the host-parasite interaction in the hope to leverage biological discovery of host molecules involved in infection into the validation of novel drug ...