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Full-Text Articles in Molecular Biology

Promoter Library Designed For Fine-Tuned Gene Expression In Pichia Pastoris, Franz S. Hartner, Claudia Ruth, David Langenegger, Sabrina N. Johnson, Petr Hyka, Geoff P. Lin-Cereghino, Joan Lin-Cereghino, Karin Kovar, James Cregg, Anton Glieder Mar 2019

Promoter Library Designed For Fine-Tuned Gene Expression In Pichia Pastoris, Franz S. Hartner, Claudia Ruth, David Langenegger, Sabrina N. Johnson, Petr Hyka, Geoff P. Lin-Cereghino, Joan Lin-Cereghino, Karin Kovar, James Cregg, Anton Glieder

Joan Lin-Cereghino

Although frequently used as protein production host, there is only a limited set of promoters available to drive the expression of recombinant proteins in Pichia pastoris. Fine-tuning of gene expression is often needed to maximize product yield and quality. However, for efficient knowledge-based engineering, a better understanding of promoter function is indispensable. Consequently, we created a promoter library by deletion and duplication of putative transcription factor-binding sites within the AOX1 promoter (PAOX1) sequence. This first library initially spanned an activity range between ∼6% and >160% of the wild-type promoter activity. After characterization of the promoter library employing a green ...


Genetic Variation In Concentration Of The 33-Mer Protein Subcomponent In Wheat, Robert L. Paris, Kaleb M. Pauley, Ryan K. Lokkesmoe, Sarah E. Lyon, James C. Dunlap, Julia M. Pierre, Timothy Vanwingerden, Finny J. Johns, Kyle J. Kilchrist, Tyler J. Reid, Caleb M. Winn Apr 2017

Genetic Variation In Concentration Of The 33-Mer Protein Subcomponent In Wheat, Robert L. Paris, Kaleb M. Pauley, Ryan K. Lokkesmoe, Sarah E. Lyon, James C. Dunlap, Julia M. Pierre, Timothy Vanwingerden, Finny J. Johns, Kyle J. Kilchrist, Tyler J. Reid, Caleb M. Winn

Robert L. Paris, Ph.D.

Celiac Disease is a hypersensitive response to gluten caused by HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 T-cell presentation, initiating destruction of intestinal epithelial cells. Currently, the only remedy for those suffering from celiac disease is elimination of all gluten from the diet. Studies indicate that an indigestible fragment of the gluten molecule, alpha-gliadin subcomponent 33-mer, rich in proline and glutamine, is responsible for the hypersensitivity response. Determination of 33-mer concentration in wheat lines could be beneficial to future development of wheat lines with reduced 33-mer concentration. Protein from wheat flour was extracted and subjected to ELISA techniques in order to quantify the concentration ...


Genetic Variation In Concentration Of The 33-Mer Protein Subcomponent In Wheat, Robert L. Paris, Kaleb M. Pauley, Ryan K. Lokkesmoe, Sarah E. Lyon, James C. Dunlap, Julia M. Pierre, Timothy Vanwingerden, Finny J. Johns, Kyle J. Kilchrist, Tyler J. Reid, Caleb M. Winn Apr 2017

Genetic Variation In Concentration Of The 33-Mer Protein Subcomponent In Wheat, Robert L. Paris, Kaleb M. Pauley, Ryan K. Lokkesmoe, Sarah E. Lyon, James C. Dunlap, Julia M. Pierre, Timothy Vanwingerden, Finny J. Johns, Kyle J. Kilchrist, Tyler J. Reid, Caleb M. Winn

Kaleb M. Pauley, Ph.D.

Celiac Disease is a hypersensitive response to gluten caused by HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 T-cell presentation, initiating destruction of intestinal epithelial cells. Currently, the only remedy for those suffering from celiac disease is elimination of all gluten from the diet. Studies indicate that an indigestible fragment of the gluten molecule, alpha-gliadin subcomponent 33-mer, rich in proline and glutamine, is responsible for the hypersensitivity response. Determination of 33-mer concentration in wheat lines could be beneficial to future development of wheat lines with reduced 33-mer concentration. Protein from wheat flour was extracted and subjected to ELISA techniques in order to quantify the concentration ...


Genetic Diversity In Concentration Of A Protein Subcomponent In Selected Wheat Lines, Andrew B. Berman, Kelsey Gentry, Alexander K. Lee, Molly Yandrofski, Malorie Young, Robert L. Paris Jul 2016

Genetic Diversity In Concentration Of A Protein Subcomponent In Selected Wheat Lines, Andrew B. Berman, Kelsey Gentry, Alexander K. Lee, Molly Yandrofski, Malorie Young, Robert L. Paris

Robert L. Paris, Ph.D.

Celiac Disease is a hypersensitive response to gluten caused by HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 T-cell presentation, initiating destruction of intestinal epithelial cells. Studies indicate that an indigestible fragment of the gluten molecule, alpha-gliadin subcomponent 33-mer, rich in proline and glutamine, is responsible for the hypersensitivity response. Determination of 33 mer concentration in wheat lines would be beneficial to future development of wheat lines with reduced 33 mer concentration. Protein from wheat flour was extracted and subjected to western blot in order to quantify the concentration of 33-mer. This will be a valuable tool for future research efforts focused on identification and ...


Staufen Negatively Modulates Microrna Activity In Caenorhabditis Elegans, Zhiji Ren, Isana Veksler-Lublinsky, David Morrissey, Victor Ambros Mar 2016

Staufen Negatively Modulates Microrna Activity In Caenorhabditis Elegans, Zhiji Ren, Isana Veksler-Lublinsky, David Morrissey, Victor Ambros

Victor R. Ambros

The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various post-transcriptional gene regulatory processes. Here we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3' untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs, or other ...


Inhibiting Mirna In Caenorhabditis Elegans Using A Potent And Selective Antisense Reagent, Genhua Zheng, Victor R. Ambros, Wen-Hong Li Oct 2015

Inhibiting Mirna In Caenorhabditis Elegans Using A Potent And Selective Antisense Reagent, Genhua Zheng, Victor R. Ambros, Wen-Hong Li

Victor R. Ambros

BACKGROUND: Antisense reagents can serve as efficient and versatile tools for studying gene function by inhibiting nucleic acids in vivo. Antisense reagents have particular utility for the experimental manipulation of the activity of microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in the regulation of diverse developmental and physiological pathways in animals. Even in traditional genetic systems, such as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, antisense reagents can provide experimental strategies complementary to mutational approaches. Presently no antisense reagents are available for inhibiting miRNAs in the nematode C. elegans. RESULTS: We have developed a new class of fluorescently labelled antisense reagents to inhibit miRNAs in ...


Systematic Analysis Of Dynamic Mirna-Target Interactions During C. Elegans Development, Liang Zhang, Molly Hammell, Brian Kudlow, Victor Ambros, Min Han Oct 2015

Systematic Analysis Of Dynamic Mirna-Target Interactions During C. Elegans Development, Liang Zhang, Molly Hammell, Brian Kudlow, Victor Ambros, Min Han

Victor R. Ambros

Although microRNA (miRNA)-mediated functions have been implicated in many aspects of animal development, the majority of miRNA::mRNA regulatory interactions remain to be characterized experimentally. We used an AIN/GW182 protein immunoprecipitation approach to systematically analyze miRNA::mRNA interactions during C. elegans development. We characterized the composition of miRNAs in functional miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISCs) at each developmental stage and identified three sets of miRNAs with distinct stage-specificity of function. We then identified thousands of miRNA targets in each developmental stage, including a significant portion that is subject to differential miRNA regulation during development. By identifying thousands of miRNA ...


Effect Of Life History On Microrna Expression During C. Elegans Development, Xantha Karp, Molly Hammell, Maria C. Ow, Victor R. Ambros Oct 2015

Effect Of Life History On Microrna Expression During C. Elegans Development, Xantha Karp, Molly Hammell, Maria C. Ow, Victor R. Ambros

Victor R. Ambros

Animals have evolved mechanisms to ensure the robustness of developmental outcomes to changing environments. MicroRNA expression may contribute to developmental robustness because microRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of developmental gene expression and can affect the expression of multiple target genes. Caenorhabditis elegans provides an excellent model to study developmental responses to environmental conditions. In favorable environments, C. elegans larvae develop rapidly and continuously through four larval stages. In contrast, in unfavorable conditions, larval development may be interrupted at either of two diapause stages: The L1 diapause occurs when embryos hatch in the absence of food, and the dauer diapause occurs ...


Micrornas: Genetically Sensitized Worms Reveal New Secrets, Victor Ambros Oct 2015

Micrornas: Genetically Sensitized Worms Reveal New Secrets, Victor Ambros

Victor R. Ambros

Why do many microRNA gene mutants display no evident phenotype? Multiply mutant worms that are selectively impaired in genetic regulatory network activities have been used to uncover previously unknown functions for numerous Caenorhabditis elegans microRNAs.


In The Tradition Of Science: An Interview With Victor Ambros, Victor R. Ambros Oct 2015

In The Tradition Of Science: An Interview With Victor Ambros, Victor R. Ambros

Victor R. Ambros

No abstract provided.


Three-Dimensional Confocal Microscopy Indentation Method For Hydrogel Elasticity Measurement, Donghee Lee, Md Mahmudur Rahman, You Zhou, Sangjin Ryu Aug 2015

Three-Dimensional Confocal Microscopy Indentation Method For Hydrogel Elasticity Measurement, Donghee Lee, Md Mahmudur Rahman, You Zhou, Sangjin Ryu

Md Mahmudur Rahman

No abstract provided.


Homeotic Gene Teashirt (Tsh) Has A Neuroprotective Function In Amyloid-Beta 42 Mediated Neurodegeneration, Michael T. Moran, Meghana Tare, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Amit Singh Jul 2015

Homeotic Gene Teashirt (Tsh) Has A Neuroprotective Function In Amyloid-Beta 42 Mediated Neurodegeneration, Michael T. Moran, Meghana Tare, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Amit Singh

Madhuri Kango-Singh

Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating age related progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognition, and eventual death of the affected individual. One of the major causes of AD is the accumulation of Amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) polypeptides formed by the improper cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. These plaques disrupt normal cellular processes through oxidative stress and aberrant signaling resulting in the loss of synaptic activity and death of the neurons. However, the detailed genetic mechanism(s) responsible for this neurodegeneration still remain elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings: We have generated a transgenic Drosophila ...


Homeotic Gene Teashirt (Tsh) Has A Neuroprotective Function In Amyloid-Beta 42 Mediated Neurodegeneration, Michael T. Moran, Meghana Tare, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Amit Singh Jul 2015

Homeotic Gene Teashirt (Tsh) Has A Neuroprotective Function In Amyloid-Beta 42 Mediated Neurodegeneration, Michael T. Moran, Meghana Tare, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Amit Singh

Amit Singh

Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating age related progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognition, and eventual death of the affected individual. One of the major causes of AD is the accumulation of Amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) polypeptides formed by the improper cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. These plaques disrupt normal cellular processes through oxidative stress and aberrant signaling resulting in the loss of synaptic activity and death of the neurons. However, the detailed genetic mechanism(s) responsible for this neurodegeneration still remain elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings: We have generated a transgenic Drosophila ...


Hnrnp A1 And Secondary Structure Coordinate Alternative Splicing Of Mag, Nancy Zearfoss, Emily Johnson, Sean Ryder May 2015

Hnrnp A1 And Secondary Structure Coordinate Alternative Splicing Of Mag, Nancy Zearfoss, Emily Johnson, Sean Ryder

Sean P. Ryder

Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a major component of myelin in the vertebrate central nervous system. MAG is present in the periaxonal region of the myelin structure, where it interacts with neuronal proteins to inhibit axon outgrowth and protect neurons from degeneration. Two alternatively spliced isoforms of Mag mRNA have been identified. The mRNA encoding the shorter isoform, known as S-MAG, contains a termination codon in exon 12, while the mRNA encoding the longer isoform, known as L-MAG, skips exon 12 and produces a protein with a longer C-terminal region. L-MAG is required in the central nervous system. How inclusion of ...


Heterogeneous Dynamics In Dna Site Discrimination By The Structurally Homologous Dna-Binding Domains Of Ets-Family Transcription Factors, Gaofei He, Ana Tolic, James K. Bashkin, Gregory M. K. Poon Apr 2015

Heterogeneous Dynamics In Dna Site Discrimination By The Structurally Homologous Dna-Binding Domains Of Ets-Family Transcription Factors, Gaofei He, Ana Tolic, James K. Bashkin, Gregory M. K. Poon

James Bashkin

The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences ...


Neutron Radiography With Combined Computed Tomography: A Novel Tool For Cancer Diagnosis And Imaging (Abstract), Maria Cekanova, H Bilheux, Kusum Rathore, J Bilheux, L Walker, Robert Donnell, Alfred Legendre May 2013

Neutron Radiography With Combined Computed Tomography: A Novel Tool For Cancer Diagnosis And Imaging (Abstract), Maria Cekanova, H Bilheux, Kusum Rathore, J Bilheux, L Walker, Robert Donnell, Alfred Legendre

Alfred M Legendre DVM, MS, DACVIM

No abstract provided.


Preclinical Single-Dose Safety And Pharmacokinetic Evaluation Of Fluorocoxib A: Pilot Study Of Novel Cyclooxygenase-2-Targeted Optical Imaging Agent In A Canine Model, Maria Cekanova, M Uddin, Alfred Legendre, Gina Gaylon, Joseph Bartges, Amanda Callens, L Marnett May 2013

Preclinical Single-Dose Safety And Pharmacokinetic Evaluation Of Fluorocoxib A: Pilot Study Of Novel Cyclooxygenase-2-Targeted Optical Imaging Agent In A Canine Model, Maria Cekanova, M Uddin, Alfred Legendre, Gina Gaylon, Joseph Bartges, Amanda Callens, L Marnett

Alfred M Legendre DVM, MS, DACVIM

We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1  mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs ...


Molecular Imaging Of Cyclooxygenase-2 In Canine Transitional Cell Carcinomas In Vitro And In Vivo, Maria Cekanova, M Uddin, Joseph Bartges, Amanda Callens, Kusum Rathore, Alfred Legendre, L Wright, L Marnett Apr 2013

Molecular Imaging Of Cyclooxygenase-2 In Canine Transitional Cell Carcinomas In Vitro And In Vivo, Maria Cekanova, M Uddin, Joseph Bartges, Amanda Callens, Kusum Rathore, Alfred Legendre, L Wright, L Marnett

Maria Cekanova MS, RNDr, PhD

The enzyme COX-2 is induced at high levels in tumors but not in surrounding normal tissues, which makes it an attractive target for molecular imaging of cancer. We evaluated the ability of novel optical imaging agent, fluorocoxib A to detect urinary bladder canine transitional cell carcinomas (K9TCC). Here, we show that fluorocoxib A uptake overlapped with COX-2 expression in primary K9TCC cells in vitro. Using subcutaneously implanted primary K9TCC in athymic mice, we show specific uptake of fluorocoxib A by COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenograft tumors in vivo. Fluorocoxib A uptake by COX-2-expressing xenograft tumors was blocked by 70% (P < 0.005) when pretreated with the COX-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib (10 mg/kg), 4 hours before intravenous administration of fluorocoxib A (1 mg/kg). Fluorocoxib A was taken up by COX-2-expressing tumors but not by COX-2-negative human UMUC-3 xenograft tumors. UMUC-3 xenograft tumors with no expression of COX-2 showed no uptake of fluorocoxib A. In addition, fluorocoxib A uptake was evaluated in five dogs diagnosed with TCC. Fluorocoxib A specifically detected COX-2-expressing K9TCC during cystoscopy in vivo but was not detected in normal urothelium. Taken together, our findings show that fluorocoxib A selectively bound to COX-2-expressing primary K9TCC cells in vitro, COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenografts tumors in nude mice, and heterogeneous canine TCC during cystoscopy in vivo. Spontaneous cancers in companion animals offer a unique translational model for evaluation of novel imaging and therapeutic agents using primary cancer cells in vitro and in heterogeneous cancers in vivo.


Genetic Parameters For Concentrations Of Minerals In Longissimus Muscle And Their Associations With Palatability Traits In Angus Cattle, R. G. Mateescu, A. J. Garmyn, Richard G. Tait Jr., Qing Duan, Q. Liu, Mary S. Mayes, Dorian J. Garrick, A. L. Van Eenennaam, D. L. Vanoverbeke, G. G. Hilton, Donald C. Beitz, James M. Reecy Apr 2013

Genetic Parameters For Concentrations Of Minerals In Longissimus Muscle And Their Associations With Palatability Traits In Angus Cattle, R. G. Mateescu, A. J. Garmyn, Richard G. Tait Jr., Qing Duan, Q. Liu, Mary S. Mayes, Dorian J. Garrick, A. L. Van Eenennaam, D. L. Vanoverbeke, G. G. Hilton, Donald C. Beitz, James M. Reecy

Richard G. Tait Jr.

The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for concentrations of minerals in LM and to evaluate their associations with beef palatability traits. Samples of LM from 2,285 Angus cattle were obtained and fabricated into steaks for analysis of mineral concentrations and for trained sensory panel assessments. Nine minerals, including calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and zinc, were quantified. Restricted maximum likelihood procedures were used to obtain estimates of variance and covariance components under a multiple-trait animal model. Estimates of heritability for mineral concentrations in LM varied from 0.01 to 0.54. Iron ...


Genetic Parameters For Carnitine, Creatine, Creatinine, Carnosine, And Anserine Concentration In Longissimus Muscle And Their Association With Palatability Traits In Angus Cattle, R. G. Mateescu, A. J. Garmyn, M. A. O'Neil, Richard G. Tait Jr., Almass A. Abuzaid, Mary S. Mayes, Dorian J. Garrick, A. L. Van Eenennaam, D. L. Vanoverbeke, G. G. Hilton, Donald C. Beitz, James M. Reecy Apr 2013

Genetic Parameters For Carnitine, Creatine, Creatinine, Carnosine, And Anserine Concentration In Longissimus Muscle And Their Association With Palatability Traits In Angus Cattle, R. G. Mateescu, A. J. Garmyn, M. A. O'Neil, Richard G. Tait Jr., Almass A. Abuzaid, Mary S. Mayes, Dorian J. Garrick, A. L. Van Eenennaam, D. L. Vanoverbeke, G. G. Hilton, Donald C. Beitz, James M. Reecy

Richard G. Tait Jr.

The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for carnitine, creatine, creatinine, carnosine, and anserine concentration in LM and to evaluate their associations with Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and beef palatability traits. Longissimus muscle samples from 2,285 Angus cattle were obtained and fabricated into steaks for analysis of carnitine, creatine, creatinine, carnosine, anserine, and other nutrients, and for trained sensory panel and WBSF assessments. Restricted maximum likelihood procedures were used to obtain estimates of variance and covariance components under a multiple-trait animal model. Estimates of heritability for carnitine, creatine, creatinine, carnosine, and anserine concentrations in LM from ...


Modulation Of Adipose Tissue Inflammation By Bioactive Food Compounds, N. Siriwardhana, N. Kalupahana, Maria Cekanova, M. Lemieux, B. Greer, N, Moustaid-Moussa Mar 2013

Modulation Of Adipose Tissue Inflammation By Bioactive Food Compounds, N. Siriwardhana, N. Kalupahana, Maria Cekanova, M. Lemieux, B. Greer, N, Moustaid-Moussa

Maria Cekanova MS, RNDr, PhD

Adipose tissue has an important endocrine function in the regulation of whole-body metabolism. Obesity leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation of the adipose tissue, which disrupts this endocrine function and results in metabolic derangements, such as type-2 diabetes. Dietary bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols and certain fatty acids, are known to suppress both systemic and adipose tissue inflammation and have the potential to improve these obesity-associated metabolic disorders. Mechanistically, polyphenolic compounds including non-flavonoids, such as curcumin and resveratrol, and flavonoids, such as catechins (tea-polyphenols), quercetin and isoflavones, suppress nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (MAPK) pathways while activating ...


Neutron Radiography With Combined Computed Tomography: A Novel Tool For Cancer Diagnosis And Imaging (Abstract), Maria Cekanova, H Bilheux, Kusum Rathore, J Bilheux, L Walker, Robert Donnell, Alfred Legendre Jan 2013

Neutron Radiography With Combined Computed Tomography: A Novel Tool For Cancer Diagnosis And Imaging (Abstract), Maria Cekanova, H Bilheux, Kusum Rathore, J Bilheux, L Walker, Robert Donnell, Alfred Legendre

Maria Cekanova MS, RNDr, PhD

No abstract provided.


Preclinical Single-Dose Safety And Pharmacokinetic Evaluation Of Fluorocoxib A: Pilot Study Of Novel Cyclooxygenase-2-Targeted Optical Imaging Agent In A Canine Model, Maria Cekanova, M Uddin, Alfred Legendre, Gina Gaylon, Joseph Bartges, Amanda Callens, L Marnett Oct 2012

Preclinical Single-Dose Safety And Pharmacokinetic Evaluation Of Fluorocoxib A: Pilot Study Of Novel Cyclooxygenase-2-Targeted Optical Imaging Agent In A Canine Model, Maria Cekanova, M Uddin, Alfred Legendre, Gina Gaylon, Joseph Bartges, Amanda Callens, L Marnett

Maria Cekanova MS, RNDr, PhD

We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1  mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs ...


Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation Is Inhibited By Bad: Regulation Of Cyclin D1, R Fernando, Js Foster, A Bible, A Ström, Rg Pestell, M Rao, Arnold Saxton, Seung Baek, K Yamaguchi, Robert Donnell, Maria Cekanova, J Wimalasena Jul 2012

Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation Is Inhibited By Bad: Regulation Of Cyclin D1, R Fernando, Js Foster, A Bible, A Ström, Rg Pestell, M Rao, Arnold Saxton, Seung Baek, K Yamaguchi, Robert Donnell, Maria Cekanova, J Wimalasena

Seung J Baek

Recent investigations suggest that functions of the proapoptotic BCL2 family members, including BAD, are not limited to regulation of apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that BAD inhibits G(1) to S phase transition in MCF7 breast cancer cells independent of apoptosis. BAD overexpression inhibited G(1) transit and cell growth as well as cyclin D1 expression. Inhibition of cyclin D1 expression was mediated through inhibition of transcription activated by AP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that BAD is localized at the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-response element (TRE) and cAMP-response element (CRE) in the cyclin D1 promoter. This was shown to reflect direct binding interactions of ...


Pulmonary Fibroblasts Stimulate The Proliferation Of Cell Lines From Human Lung Adenocarcinomas, Maria Cekanova, T Masi, Howard Plummer, M Majidi, P Fedorocko, Hildegard Schuller Aug 2011

Pulmonary Fibroblasts Stimulate The Proliferation Of Cell Lines From Human Lung Adenocarcinomas, Maria Cekanova, T Masi, Howard Plummer, M Majidi, P Fedorocko, Hildegard Schuller

Howard K. Plummer III

Human lung cancer cell lines are widely used to test anticancer drugs. These in-vitro tests, however, preclude the detection of responses to paracrine factors from surrounding stroma. We have cocultured pulmonary fibroblasts CCD-19Lu, from a healthy donor, or HLF-A, from a patient with epidermoid carcinoma of the lung, with two human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell lines to test the hypothesis that the fibroblasts stimulate the growth of the tumor cells. Both fibroblast cell lines significantly increased the proliferation of the pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell lines in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assays, with HLF-A fibroblasts yielding the most pronounced responses ...


Expression Of G-Protein Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels (Girks) In Lung Cancer Cell Lines, Howard Plummer, Madhu Dhar, Maria Cekanova, Hildegard Schuller Aug 2011

Expression Of G-Protein Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels (Girks) In Lung Cancer Cell Lines, Howard Plummer, Madhu Dhar, Maria Cekanova, Hildegard Schuller

Howard K. Plummer III

BACKGROUND: Previous data from our laboratory has indicated that there is a functional link between the beta-adrenergic receptor signaling pathway and the G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1) in human breast cancer cell lines. We wanted to determine if GIRK channels were expressed in lung cancers and if a similar link exists in lung cancer. METHODS: GIRK1-4 expression and levels were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. GIRK protein levels were determined by western blots and cell proliferation was determined by a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay. RESULTS: GIRK1 mRNA was expressed in three of six ...


Small Rnas Prevent Transcription-Coupled Erosion Of Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methylation In Arabidopsis Thaliana, Raymond Enke, Z. Dong, J. Bender Dec 2010

Small Rnas Prevent Transcription-Coupled Erosion Of Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methylation In Arabidopsis Thaliana, Raymond Enke, Z. Dong, J. Bender

Ray Enke Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


A Feedback Circuit Involving Let-7-Family Mirnas And Daf-12 Integrates Environmental Signals And Developmental Timing In Caenorhabditis Elegans, Christopher M. Hammell, Xantha Karp, Victor R. Ambros Nov 2009

A Feedback Circuit Involving Let-7-Family Mirnas And Daf-12 Integrates Environmental Signals And Developmental Timing In Caenorhabditis Elegans, Christopher M. Hammell, Xantha Karp, Victor R. Ambros

Victor R. Ambros

Animal development is remarkably robust; cell fates are specified with spatial and temporal precision despite physiological and environmental contingencies. Favorable conditions cause Caenorhabditis elegans to develop rapidly through four larval stages (L1-L4) to the reproductive adult. In unfavorable conditions, L2 larvae can enter the developmentally quiescent, stress-resistant dauer larva stage, enabling them to survive for prolonged periods before completing development. A specific progression of cell division and differentiation events occurs with fidelity during the larval stages, regardless of whether an animal undergoes continuous or dauer-interrupted development. The temporal patterning of developmental events is controlled by the heterochronic genes, whose products ...


Ppar Agonists Down-Regulate The Expression Of Atp10c Mrna During Adipogenesis, A Peretich, Maria Cekanova Ms, Rndr, Phd, S Hurst, Sj Baek, Madhu Dahr Oct 2009

Ppar Agonists Down-Regulate The Expression Of Atp10c Mrna During Adipogenesis, A Peretich, Maria Cekanova Ms, Rndr, Phd, S Hurst, Sj Baek, Madhu Dahr

Maria Cekanova MS, RNDr, PhD

No abstract provided.


Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Activated Gene-1 Expression Inhibits Urethane-Induced Pulmonary Tumorigenesis In Transgenic Mice, Maria Cekanova, Seong-Ho Lee, Robert Donnell, M Sukhthankar, Te Eling, Sm Fischer, Seung Baek Apr 2009

Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Activated Gene-1 Expression Inhibits Urethane-Induced Pulmonary Tumorigenesis In Transgenic Mice, Maria Cekanova, Seong-Ho Lee, Robert Donnell, M Sukhthankar, Te Eling, Sm Fischer, Seung Baek

Maria Cekanova MS, RNDr, PhD

The expression of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene-1 (NAG-1) inhibits gastrointestinal tumorigenesis in NAG-1 transgenic mice (C57/BL6 background). In the present study, we investigated whether the NAG-1 protein would alter urethane-induced pulmonary lesions in NAG-1 transgenic mice on an FVB background (NAG-1(Tg+/FVB)). NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice had both decreased number and size of urethane-induced tumors, compared with control littermates (NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) = 16 +/- 4 per mouse versus control = 20 +/- 7 per mouse, P < 0.05). Urethane-induced pulmonary adenomas and adenocarcinomas were observed in control mice; however, only pulmonary adenomas were observed in NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice. Urethane-induced tumors from control littermates and NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice highly expressed proteins in the arachidonic acid pathway (cyclooxygenases 1/2, prostaglandin E synthase, and prostaglandin E(2) receptor) and highly activated several kinases (phospho-Raf-1 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2). However, only urethane-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was decreased in NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice. Furthermore, significantly increased apoptosis in tumors of NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice compared with control mice was observed as assessed by caspase-3/7 activity. In addition, fewer inflammatory cells were observed in the lung tissue isolated from urethane-treated NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice compared with control mice. These results paralleled in vitro assays using human A549 pulmonary carcinoma cells. Less phosphorylated p38 MAPK was observed in cells overexpressing NAG-1 compared with control cells. Overall, our study revealed for the first time that the NAG-1 protein inhibits urethane-induced tumor formation, probably mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway, and is a possible new target for lung cancer chemoprevention.