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Molecular Biology Commons

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Developmental Biology

University of Massachusetts Medical School

Fertility

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Molecular Biology

Small Rnas And Argonautes Provide A Paternal Epigenetic Memory Of Germline Gene Expression To Promote Thermotolerant Male Fertility: A Dissertation, Colin C. Conine Sep 2014

Small Rnas And Argonautes Provide A Paternal Epigenetic Memory Of Germline Gene Expression To Promote Thermotolerant Male Fertility: A Dissertation, Colin C. Conine

GSBS Dissertations and Theses

During each life cycle, gametes must preserve and pass on both genetic and epigenetic information, making the germline both immortal and totipotent. In the male germline the dramatic morphological transformation of a germ cell through meiosis, into a sperm competent for fertilization, while retaining this information is an incredible example of cellular differentiation. This process of spermatogenesis is inherently thermosensitive in numerous metazoa ranging from worms to man. Here, I describe the role of two redundant AGO-class paralogs, ALG-3/4, and their small RNA cofactors, in promoting thermotolerant male fertility in Caenorhabditis elegans. alg-3/4 double mutants exhibit temperature dependent ...


The Embryonic Mir-35 Family Of Micrornas Promotes Multiple Aspects Of Fecundity In Caenorhabditis Elegans, Katherine Mcjunkin, Victor R. Ambros Jul 2014

The Embryonic Mir-35 Family Of Micrornas Promotes Multiple Aspects Of Fecundity In Caenorhabditis Elegans, Katherine Mcjunkin, Victor R. Ambros

Program in Molecular Medicine Publications and Presentations

MicroRNAs guide many aspects of development in all metazoan species. Frequently, microRNAs are expressed during a specific developmental stage to perform a temporally defined function. The C. elegans mir-35-42 microRNAs are expressed abundantly in oocytes and early embryos and are essential for embryonic development. Here, we show that these embryonic microRNAs surprisingly also function to control the number of progeny produced by adult hermaphrodites. Using a temperature-sensitive mir-35-42 family mutant (a deletion of the mir-35-41 cluster), we demonstrate three distinct defects in hermaphrodite fecundity. At permissive temperatures, a mild sperm defect partially reduces hermaphrodite fecundity. At restrictive temperatures, somatic gonad ...