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Aquaculture and Fisheries Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1994

Crassostrea virginica

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Full-Text Articles in Aquaculture and Fisheries

Modeling Oyster Populations Ii. Adult Size And Reproductive Effort, E. E. Hofmann, J. M. Klinck, E. N. Powell, S. Boyles, M. Ellis Jan 1994

Modeling Oyster Populations Ii. Adult Size And Reproductive Effort, E. E. Hofmann, J. M. Klinck, E. N. Powell, S. Boyles, M. Ellis

CCPO Publications

A time-dependent model of energy flow in post-settlement oyster populations is used to examine the factors that influence adult size and reproductive effort in a particular habitat, Galveston Bay, Texas, and in habitats that extend from Laguna Madre, Texas to Chesapeake Bay. The simulated populations show that adult size and reproductive effort are determined by the allocation of net production to somatic or reproductive tissue development and the rate of food acquisition, both of which are temperature dependent. For similar food conditions, increased temperature reduces the allocation of net production to somatic tissue and increases the rate of food acquisition ...


Modeling Oyster Populations. Iv. Rates Of Mortality, Population Crashes, And Management, E. N. Powell, J. M. Klinck, E. E. Hofmann, S. M. Ray Jan 1994

Modeling Oyster Populations. Iv. Rates Of Mortality, Population Crashes, And Management, E. N. Powell, J. M. Klinck, E. E. Hofmann, S. M. Ray

CCPO Publications

A time-dependent energy-flow model was used to examine how mortality affects oyster populations over the latitudinal gradient from Galveston Bay, Texas, to Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Simulations using different mortality rates showed that mortality is required for market-site oysters to be a component of the population's size-frequency distribution; otherwise a population of stunted individuals results. As mortality extends into the juvenile sizes, the population's size frequency shifts toward the larger sizes. In many cases adults increase despite a decrease in overall population abundance. Simulations, in which the timing of mortality varied, showed that oyster populations are more susceptible to ...