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Full-Text Articles in Aquaculture and Fisheries

Zebra Mussel (Dreissena Polymorpha) Affects The Feeding Ecology Of Early Stage Striped Bass (Morone Saxatilis) In The Hudson River Estuary, Michael G. Smircich, David L. Strayer, Eric T. Schultz Jan 2016

Zebra Mussel (Dreissena Polymorpha) Affects The Feeding Ecology Of Early Stage Striped Bass (Morone Saxatilis) In The Hudson River Estuary, Michael G. Smircich, David L. Strayer, Eric T. Schultz

EEB Articles

Variability in the feeding ecology of young fishes over short and long time scales in estuaries is likely to affect population dynamics. We studied 14 years of early stage Striped Bass feeding ecology in the Hudson River Estuary over a 25-year time span, including years in which invasive zebra mussels markedly altered energy flow within the estuary. We predicted that feeding success would be low and that diet composition would be altered during years of high zebra mussel impact, particularly in upriver locations where mussels occur. Feeding success in the short term was indicated by volume of gut contents and ...


An Approach For Use Of Dual Frequency Identification Sonar (Didson) To Quantify Behavioral Aspects Of Piscivory At Ecologically Relevant Time And Space Scales, Victoria E. Price May 2012

An Approach For Use Of Dual Frequency Identification Sonar (Didson) To Quantify Behavioral Aspects Of Piscivory At Ecologically Relevant Time And Space Scales, Victoria E. Price

Master's Theses

Predator-prey interactions of large vagile fishes are difficult to study in the ocean due to limitations in the space and time requirements for observations. Small-scale direct underwater observations by divers (<10m >radius) and large-scale hydroacoustic surveys (10s - 100s km2) are traditional approaches. However, large piscivorous predators identify and attack prey at the scale of meters to tens of meters. Dual- Frequency Identification Sonar, or DIDSON, is a high-resolution acoustic camera operating in the MHz range that provides detailed continuous video-like imaging of objects out to 30 m range. This technology can be used to observe predator-prey interactions at ecologically relevant space ...


Out Of Sight, But Not Out Of Mind: A Look At Nanoparticles In The Marine Environment, Evan Ward, John J. Doyle Jan 2012

Out Of Sight, But Not Out Of Mind: A Look At Nanoparticles In The Marine Environment, Evan Ward, John J. Doyle

Wrack Lines

Nanoparticles exist in many products used by humans, such as sunscreens. medications, cosmetics, paints and electronics. But what is the effect of these tiny particles on the ocean or estuarine environment when the sunscreen washes off? This article looks at that question and at shellfish in particular. Evan Ward and John Doyle are marine scientists at UConn.


Angler Survey Of The Connecticut River, Justin P. Davis Jan 2011

Angler Survey Of The Connecticut River, Justin P. Davis

EEB Articles

The Connecticut River is the largest and most diverse inland fishery resource in the State of Connecticut. Significant improvements in water quality over the past 30 years have led to progressive increases in recreational use, presumably increasing fishing pressure on some species and possibly decreasing overall fishing quality. To address this concern, the Inland Fisheries Division (IFD) of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT DEEP) conducted an angler survey on the entire portion of the Connecticut River within the state during March-October of 2008-09. The survey used a similar design as a smaller-scale survey of the river ...


Environmental And Endogenous Factors Influencing Emigration In Juvenile Anadromous Alewives, Benjamin I. Gahagan, Eric T. Schultz, Katie E. Gherard Jan 2010

Environmental And Endogenous Factors Influencing Emigration In Juvenile Anadromous Alewives, Benjamin I. Gahagan, Eric T. Schultz, Katie E. Gherard

EEB Articles

We analyzed juvenile anadromous alewife migration at Bride Lake, a coastal lake in Connecticut, during summer 2006 and found that migration on 24-hour and seasonal timescales was influenced by conditions of the environment and characteristics of the individual. To identify environmental cues of juvenile migration, we continuously video recorded fish at the lake outflow and employed information-theoretic model selection to identify the best predictors of daily migration rate. More than 80% of the approximately 320,000 juveniles that migrated from mid-June to mid-August departed in three pulses lasting one or two days. Pulses of migration were associated with precipitation events ...


Looking Ahead To Spring's Returning Bounty: Natal Homing, Jason Vokoun, Benjamin Gahagan Dec 2009

Looking Ahead To Spring's Returning Bounty: Natal Homing, Jason Vokoun, Benjamin Gahagan

Wrack Lines

Natal homing plays a part in fisheries restoration. This article describes research by Dr. Jason Vokoun and his students on otoliths in migratory finfish such as river herring, alewives, etc.


Temporal Shifts In Demography And Life History Of An Anadromous Alewife Population In Connecticut, Justin P. Davis, Eric T. Schultz May 2009

Temporal Shifts In Demography And Life History Of An Anadromous Alewife Population In Connecticut, Justin P. Davis, Eric T. Schultz

EEB Articles

Populations of anadromous alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) are declining throughout much of their range, particularly in southern New England where fishery moratoriums have recently been instituted in three states. The alewife run at Bride Brook, a coastal stream in East Lyme, Connecticut, was studied from 2003-06 to assess shifts in demography and life history. Annual censuses of abundance, along with sampling for size, age, and spawning history structure were conducted. These data were compared to similar data in 1966-67 at this site. Recent alewife runs at Bride Brook featured lower abundance and younger, smaller fish that were less likely to be ...


Fort Richardson Ordnance Detonations And The Harbor Porpoise: A Case Study In Marine Mammal Bioacoustics, Heather Heenehan May 2009

Fort Richardson Ordnance Detonations And The Harbor Porpoise: A Case Study In Marine Mammal Bioacoustics, Heather Heenehan

Honors Scholar Theses

Hearing is extremely important for cetaceans because it is their “principal sense” (Weilgart, 2007) thus the harbor porpoise and other marine animals are highly dependent on sound for survival. This is why we should care about the impact of noise on animals like the harbor porpoise. Since sound travels so well in water, an explosion, sonar, boat noise, etc. can affect a very large area and thus many different species of marine mammals. Although military actions such as low frequency sonar have made recent news, noise has been affecting cetaceans, especially beaked whales, since at least 1991 (Weilgart, 2007).

This ...


Estimating Predation On Declining River Herring: Tag-Recapture Study Of Striped Bass In The Connecticut River, Eric T. Schultz, Justin P. Davis, Jason Vokoun Jan 2009

Estimating Predation On Declining River Herring: Tag-Recapture Study Of Striped Bass In The Connecticut River, Eric T. Schultz, Justin P. Davis, Jason Vokoun

EEB Articles

Populations of anadromous alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and blueback herring Alosa aestivalis, collectively referred to as river herring, have declined in the Connecticut River. A hypothesis for why river herring have declined is that predation pressures have increased associated with recent increases in abundance of striped bass Morone saxatilis. Information on striped bass abundance, size structure, and consumption rates are required to test this hypothesis. This study was designed to provide estimates of striped bass population size in the Connecticut River during the spring migration season, via an intensive mark-recapture exercise and either an open or robust mark-recapture model. Striped bass ...


Assessment Of River Herring And Striped Bass In The Connecticut River: Abundance, Population Structure, And Predator/Prey Interactions, Justin P. Davis, Eric T. Schultz, Jason Vokoun Jan 2009

Assessment Of River Herring And Striped Bass In The Connecticut River: Abundance, Population Structure, And Predator/Prey Interactions, Justin P. Davis, Eric T. Schultz, Jason Vokoun

EEB Articles

Populations of anadromous alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and blueback herring A. aestivalis, collectively referred to as river herring, have declined in the Connecticut River. An explanatory hypothesis for these declines is that predation pressures have increased as a result of recent increases in abundance of sympatric striped bass Morone saxatilis. We sampled river herring and striped bass from the stretch of the Connecticut River between Wethersfield, CT and Holyoke, MA during the vernal migration seasons of 2005-2008. The objectives of the sampling program were to assess abundance, temporal/spatial distribution, and population structure of both river herring and striped bass, as ...


Determining Winter Flounder Spawning Sites In Two Connecticut Estuaries, Eric T. Schultz, Jose J. Pereira, Peter J. Auster Jan 2007

Determining Winter Flounder Spawning Sites In Two Connecticut Estuaries, Eric T. Schultz, Jose J. Pereira, Peter J. Auster

EEB Articles

Winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) come inshore during the late winter and early spring to lay their eggs in shallow bays and estuaries along the coast. Unlike most fish eggs, which are buoyant, these eggs are demersal and sink to the seafloor. This makes them vulnerable to burial from various types of natural and human caused disturbances (e.g., storms, mobile fishing gear, maintenance dredging). Our objective was to map spawning areas in two harbors and search for generalities among these sites that would allow us to predict where winter flounder might spawn in other areas. This would allow managers to ...


Anadromous Rainbow Smelt And Tomcod In Connecticut: Assessment Of Populations, Conservation Status, And Need For Restoration Plan, Heather A. Fried, Eric T. Schultz Jun 2006

Anadromous Rainbow Smelt And Tomcod In Connecticut: Assessment Of Populations, Conservation Status, And Need For Restoration Plan, Heather A. Fried, Eric T. Schultz

EEB Articles

(beginning of rainbow smelt executive summary)

Evidence indicates that anadromous rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) populations in Connecticut and elsewhere in the northeast United States have severely declined. Several sampling programs have documented declines in Connecticut’s smelt populations over the last three decades (Marcy 1976a, Marcy 1976b, Millstone Environmental Laboratory 2005). Similar declines have also been documented in the Hudson River (ASA Analysis & Communication 2005) and in Massachusetts (personal communication, Brad Chase, MA Division of Marine Fisheries 2004). Recreational and commercial fisheries in the region for this species have virtually ceased (Blake and Smith 1984). The Connecticut Fish Advisory Committee ...


Assessment Of Anadromous Alewife And Blueback Herring Populations In Connecticut Coastal Streams And Connecticut River Tributaries, Justin P. Davis, Eric T. Schultz Jan 2006

Assessment Of Anadromous Alewife And Blueback Herring Populations In Connecticut Coastal Streams And Connecticut River Tributaries, Justin P. Davis, Eric T. Schultz

EEB Articles

Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (A. aestivalis) occur in anadromous populations that have a largely overlapping distribution from Florida to Newfoundland (Loesch 1987). Anadromous populations of these species are commonly collectively referred to as “river herring”. Adults inhabit coastal shelf waters until sexual maturity is reached at age 3-5 (Neves 1981). Sexually mature individuals make spawning migrations, commonly referred to as “runs”, into freshwater systems during spring months (Loesch 1987). Spawners can survive and return to spawn in subsequent years (Mullen et al. 1986). Juveniles reside in freshwater for 3-7 months, at which time they undertake a gradual migration ...


The Essentials On Estuarine Fish Habitat, Its Evaluation And Protection By Federal Fisheries Law, Eric T. Schultz, Michael Ludwig Jan 2005

The Essentials On Estuarine Fish Habitat, Its Evaluation And Protection By Federal Fisheries Law, Eric T. Schultz, Michael Ludwig

EEB Articles

No abstract provided.


Distribution, Habitat Use, Growth, And Condition Of A Native And An Introduced Catfish Species In The Hudson River Estuary, Stephen M. Jordan, Robert M. Neumann, Eric T. Schultz Jan 2004

Distribution, Habitat Use, Growth, And Condition Of A Native And An Introduced Catfish Species In The Hudson River Estuary, Stephen M. Jordan, Robert M. Neumann, Eric T. Schultz

EEB Articles

White catfish (Ameiurus catus) is native to the Hudson River and is now coexisting with the recently established channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). These species were sampled from four freshwater reaches and four habitat types of the Hudson River estuary to assess whether the two species overlapped in their habitat use, and whether any impact on the native species was evident. Catfishes were sampled in 1998 and 1999 using baited hoop nets (N = 708 net nights). Catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE, number of fish per net night; total catch = 368) of white catfish was significantly different among reaches and habitat types; CPUE was greatest ...


Studies Of The Ichthyofauna Of Connecticut, Paul M. Jacobson Sep 1980

Studies Of The Ichthyofauna Of Connecticut, Paul M. Jacobson

Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station

No abstract provided.


An Evaluation Of The Fishery Resources Of The Thames River Watershed, Connecticut, Connecticut Department Of Environmental Protection May 1975

An Evaluation Of The Fishery Resources Of The Thames River Watershed, Connecticut, Connecticut Department Of Environmental Protection

Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station

No abstract provided.