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Articles 1 - 30 of 191

Full-Text Articles in Aquaculture and Fisheries

Introduction: Social-Ecological Resilience And Law, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Craig R. Allen, Craig Anthony Arnold, Lance H. Gunderson Apr 2019

Introduction: Social-Ecological Resilience And Law, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Craig R. Allen, Craig Anthony Arnold, Lance H. Gunderson

Craig Anthony (Tony) Arnold

Environmental law is intimately connected to ecological concepts and understanding. The legal instruments, institutions, and administration of law in the United States are predicated on assumptions that nature is globally stable and that the inherent variability in ecological systems is bounded. This current legal framework is based upon an understanding of ecological systems operating near an equilibrium, or if disturbed, moving back toward an equilibrium. Such assumptions make much current environmental law ill-suited for many pressing environmental issues (Ruhl 1999; Garmestani et al. 2009; Craig 2010; Verchick 2010; Benson and Garmestani 2011). Emerging environmental challenges, such as cross-boundary water governance ...


Quantifying Uncertainty And Trade-Offs In Resilience Assessments, Craig R. Allen, Hannah E. Birgé, David G. Angeler, Craig A. Arnold, Brian C. Chaffin, Daniel A. Decaro, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Lance Gunderson Apr 2019

Quantifying Uncertainty And Trade-Offs In Resilience Assessments, Craig R. Allen, Hannah E. Birgé, David G. Angeler, Craig A. Arnold, Brian C. Chaffin, Daniel A. Decaro, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Lance Gunderson

Craig Anthony (Tony) Arnold

Several frameworks have been developed to assess the resilience of social-ecological systems, but most require substantial data inputs, time, and technical expertise. Stakeholders and practitioners often lack the resources for such intensive efforts. Furthermore, most end with problem framing and fail to explicitly address trade-offs and uncertainty. To remedy this gap, we developed a rapid survey assessment that compares the relative resilience of social-ecological systems with respect to a number of resilience properties. This approach generates large amounts of information relative to stakeholder inputs. We targeted four stakeholder categories: government (policy, regulation, management), end users (farmers, ranchers, landowners, industry), agency ...


Barriers And Bridges To The Integration Of Social–Ecological Resilience And Law, Olivia Odom Green, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Craig R. Allen, Lance H. Gunderson, J.B. Ruhl, Craig A. Arnold, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Barbara Cosens, David G. Angeler, Brian C. Chaffin, C.S. Holling Apr 2019

Barriers And Bridges To The Integration Of Social–Ecological Resilience And Law, Olivia Odom Green, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Craig R. Allen, Lance H. Gunderson, J.B. Ruhl, Craig A. Arnold, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Barbara Cosens, David G. Angeler, Brian C. Chaffin, C.S. Holling

Craig Anthony (Tony) Arnold

There is a fundamental difference between the ways in which ecologists and lawyers view uncertainty: in the study of ecology, uncertainty provides a catalyst for exploration, whereas uncertainty is antithetical to the rule of law. This issue is particularly troubling in environmental management, where the tensions between law and ecology become apparent. Rather than acknowledge uncertainties in management actions, legal frameworks often force a false sense of certainty in linking cause and effect. While adaptive management has been developed to deal with uncertainty, laws and legal wrangling can be obstacles to implementation. In this article, we recommend resilience-based governance – “adaptive ...


Influence Of Amino Acid Supplementations In Juvenile Yellow Perch Fed Plant Protein Combinations, Aaron J. Von Eschen, Michael L. Brown, Kurt A. Rosentrater Apr 2019

Influence Of Amino Acid Supplementations In Juvenile Yellow Perch Fed Plant Protein Combinations, Aaron J. Von Eschen, Michael L. Brown, Kurt A. Rosentrater

Kurt A. Rosentrater

Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) in combination with soy protein concentrate (SPC) with and without an essential amino acid (EAA) complex were assessed as protein alternatives in juvenile Yellow Perch Perca flavescens diets. Diets contained 5% FM, 40% SPC, and 20% or 40% DDGS each with or without EAA. No mortalities or health assessment differences were observed during the trial and all fish readily accepted the experimental diets. Diets supplemented with EAA produced greater weight gain, improved feed conversion, and apparent protein digestibility. Performance was consistently improved for fish fed diets containing amino acid supplements. Based on these results ...


Does The Seal Licensing System In Scotland Have A Negative Impact On Seal Welfare?, Laetitia Nunny, Fritha Langford, Mark P. Simmonds Jan 2019

Does The Seal Licensing System In Scotland Have A Negative Impact On Seal Welfare?, Laetitia Nunny, Fritha Langford, Mark P. Simmonds

Mark P. Simmonds, O.B.E.

This study examined the licensing system that permits seal shooting in Scotland, which was established under Part 6 Conservation of Seals of the Marine (Scotland) Act 2010. Four approaches were used: data were collated and analyzed from both the Scottish Government and Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme; a survey was sent to current license holders and informal interviews were conducted with key stakeholder types. Between February 2011 and the end of October 2015, 1229 gray seals, and 275 common seals were reported shot under license to the Scottish Government. The numbers of seals reported as shot has reduced year-on-year since ...


An Annotated Genome For Haliotis Rufescens (Red Abalone) And Resequenced Green, Pink, Pinto, Black And White Abalone Species, Rick E. Masonbrink, Catherine Purcell, Sara Boles, Andrew Whitehead, John Hyde, Arun S. Seetharam, Andrew J. Severin Jan 2019

An Annotated Genome For Haliotis Rufescens (Red Abalone) And Resequenced Green, Pink, Pinto, Black And White Abalone Species, Rick E. Masonbrink, Catherine Purcell, Sara Boles, Andrew Whitehead, John Hyde, Arun S. Seetharam, Andrew J. Severin

Andrew Severin

Abalone are one of the few marine taxa where aquaculture production dominates the global market as a result of increasing demand and declining natural stocks from overexploitation and disease. To better understand abalone biology, aid in conservation efforts for endangered abalone species, and gain insight into sustainable aquaculture, we created a draft genome of the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens). The approach to this genome draft included initial assembly using raw Illumina and PacBio sequencing data with MaSuRCA, before scaffolding using sequencing data generated from Chicago library preparations with HiRise2. This assembly approach resulted in 8,371 scaffolds and total length ...


Growth Characteristics Of Newly Isolated Indonesian Microalgae Under Diferent Salinity, Michael A. Rice, Wa Iba, Gary H. Wikfors, Lucie Maranda Nov 2018

Growth Characteristics Of Newly Isolated Indonesian Microalgae Under Diferent Salinity, Michael A. Rice, Wa Iba, Gary H. Wikfors, Lucie Maranda

Michael A Rice

The aim of this study was to investigate the growth characteristics of microalgae strains isolated from
Kendari Bay and the Wanggu River estuary, Indonesia. The growth of the isolates, denoted as Kb1-2, Kb1-
3, Kb1-5, and Kb2-6, were evaluated under controlled conditions. A batch culture experiment of these
strains except Kb2-6 was conducted for 15 days under salinity levels of 20, 25, 30 and 35 gL-1. Tetraselmis
chui, Tisochrysis lutea and Chaetoceros neogracile were also culture and used as the growth references. Cell
density was measured every day and cell size was measured from 50 live cells during the logarithmic ...


Freshwater Aquaculture And Its Permitting In Rhode Island: Two Case Studies, Michael A. Rice, Joseph B. Haberek, David Beutel Nov 2018

Freshwater Aquaculture And Its Permitting In Rhode Island: Two Case Studies, Michael A. Rice, Joseph B. Haberek, David Beutel

Michael A Rice

In Rhode Island permits to conduct aquaculture, including freshwater aquaculture, are issued by the Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) as the designated lead agency by state law. However, by Rhode Island law, aquaculture is considered a form of agriculture. It is the responsibility and duty of the state aquaculture coordinator in CRMC to receive aquaculture applications and coordinate the review of these applications through the multiple federal, state and local agencies that hold regulatory jurisdiction. Since most freshwater aquaculture is conducted on private lands rather than in public trust waters of the state, there is no leasing review. If the ...


Freshwater Aquaculture And Its Permitting In Rhode Island: Two Case Studies, Michael A. Rice, Joseph B. Haberek, David Beutel Nov 2018

Freshwater Aquaculture And Its Permitting In Rhode Island: Two Case Studies, Michael A. Rice, Joseph B. Haberek, David Beutel

Michael A Rice

In Rhode Island permits to conduct aquaculture, including freshwater aquaculture, are issued by the Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) as the designated lead agency by state law. However, by Rhode Island law, aquaculture is considered a form of agriculture. It is the responsibility and duty of the state aquaculture coordinator in CRMC to receive aquaculture applications and coordinate the review of these applications through the multiple federal, state and local agencies that hold regulatory jurisdiction. Since most freshwater aquaculture is conducted on private lands rather than in public trust waters of the state, there is no leasing review. If the ...


The Trophic Gradient In Lake Powell, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, G. Steinhart Oct 2018

The Trophic Gradient In Lake Powell, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, G. Steinhart

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

From April 21 st to April 25th, 1995 students from Utah State University's FW 462 class sampled the trophic gradient in Lake Powell between Bullfrog (Mile 99) and Hite Marinas (Mile 144). We sampled at 3-12 stations along the gradient, depending on the parameter measured. The purpose of the trip was three-fold. First, the primary objective of the class was to provide field and laboratory experiences in aquatic ecology for the students. Secondly, we wished to provide data on the trophic environment that the endangered razorback sucker larvae from the Colorado River would encounter when the entered the reservoir ...


Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat And Limnological Research, David Teuscher, Doug Taki, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh Oct 2018

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat And Limnological Research, David Teuscher, Doug Taki, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Historically, thousands of Snake River Sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley to spawn. Evermann (1896) reported that the Sawtooth Valley Lakes were teeming with red fish. Bjornn (196~) estimated that 4,360 sockeye returned to Redfish Lake in 1955. These numbers no longer exist. In the 1980's, less than 50 Snake River sockeye salmon survived to spawn (Bowler 1990). Since 19-90, only 13 sockeye have returned. Because of recent declines, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS-) to list Snake River sockeye as endangered. As a result, Snake River sockeye were listed and the ...


Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat And Limnological Research, David Teuscher, Doug Taki, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh Oct 2018

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat And Limnological Research, David Teuscher, Doug Taki, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Historically, thousands of Snake River Sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley to spawn. Evermann (1896) reported that the Sawtooth Valley Lakes were teeming with red fish. Bjornn (1968) estimated that 4,360 sockeye returned to Redfish Lake in 1955. These numbers no longer exist. In the 1980's, less than 50 . Snake River sockeye salmon survived to spawn (Bowler 1990). Since 1990, only 14 sockeye have returned. Because of recent declines, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) petitioned the National - Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list · Snake River sockeye as endangered. As a result, Snake River sockeye were listed and the ...


Hydrogen Sulfide In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake: A Potential Odor-Causing Agent, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli Oct 2018

Hydrogen Sulfide In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake: A Potential Odor-Causing Agent, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Odors from Farmington Bay and/or the Great Salt Lake frequently impact residents of Salt Lake and Davis counties, but the agent causing the problem and the origin of the odor is uncertain. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is produced in the deeper layers of water in Farmington Bay and Gilbert Bay in the Great Salt Lake, but these deeper waters are generally part of high salinity deep-brine layers that are resistant to wind mixing. Hydrogen sulfide has a "rotten-egg" odor and is a likely component contributing to the "lake stink." The goals of this study were to determine (1) whether ...


Effect Of Fish Size On Prey Size Selection In Gambusia Affinis, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Joseph J. Cech Jr., James Compton Oct 2018

Effect Of Fish Size On Prey Size Selection In Gambusia Affinis, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Joseph J. Cech Jr., James Compton

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Food size selection of the mosquitofish , Gambusia affinis affinis. was measured in aquaria using juvenile stages of the mosquito, Clllex tarsalb;, as prey. Fish size varied from recently born fry to large adult females. Food size selection was positively correlated with fish size. Mosquitofish fry (6-8 111m standard length) attacked and ate primarily first and second instar larvae. Fry attacked larger instars, but attack success on these was low (0 - 50%). Fish larger than 20 mm attached primarily pupae and third and fourth instar larva. No first instar mosquitoes were eaten. Attack success for these fish was above 65'Yr ...


A Trophic Gradient Analysis Of Lake Powell: The 1994 Utah State University Aquatic Ecology Laboratory Analyses, Wayne Wurtsbaugh, Megan Barker, Ron Brunson, David Fogle, Scott Hawxhurst, Chad Mellison, Lis Phillips, Felipe Queiroz, Daniel Zamecnik Oct 2018

A Trophic Gradient Analysis Of Lake Powell: The 1994 Utah State University Aquatic Ecology Laboratory Analyses, Wayne Wurtsbaugh, Megan Barker, Ron Brunson, David Fogle, Scott Hawxhurst, Chad Mellison, Lis Phillips, Felipe Queiroz, Daniel Zamecnik

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

From 9-11 April, 1994, the Aquatic Ecology Laboratory Class (FW462) of Utah State University sampled the upper reaches of Lake Powell to assess if a trophic gradient existed. We °ampled physical and chemical parameters (temperature, oxygen, conductivity, and total phosphorus), phytoplankton chlorophyll a, littoral and pelagic zooplankton biomass and composition, littoral and profundal benthic invertebrates, and fish abundance measured in the littoral zone (gill nets) and the pelagic zone (hydroacoustics). Data was collected along the upper 50 miles of the reservoir between Bullfrog and the Hite marina near the Colorado River inflow.

Our field trip was done just prior to ...


Analysis Of Phytoplankton Nutrient Limitation In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli Oct 2018

Analysis Of Phytoplankton Nutrient Limitation In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

The Great Salt Lake is bordered to the south and east by a growing metropolitan area that contributes high nutrients to Farmington Bay. This large bay is eutrophic, and there is concern that continued increases in effluents from the Salt Lake City area could extend to impact the much larger, and currently less productive, Gilbert Bay. This study focused on determining how nutrient supplies might limit, and therefore control, algal populations in Farmington Bay and Gilbert Bay at different salinities. We tested both short and long-term responses of algal growth using laboratory nutrient addition bioassays in the summer and fall ...


Comparative Analysis Of Pollution In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake, Utah, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli, Cameron Christison, Joel Moore, Donovan Gross, Sophia Bates, Sara Kircher Oct 2018

Comparative Analysis Of Pollution In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake, Utah, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli, Cameron Christison, Joel Moore, Donovan Gross, Sophia Bates, Sara Kircher

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Farmington Bay covers 94 mi2 (260 km2) in the SW comer of the Great Salt Lake, and is essentially a separate lake because it is enclosed by Antelope Island and a causeway leading to the island from the mainland. The bay has received wastes from the adjoining Salt Lake City metropolitan area for decades. Because of water quality concerns for Farmington 8ay, the Aquatic Ecology Laboratory class at Utah State University studied the bay and a nearby control site (Bridger Bay) in the Great Salt Lake during the fall of 2001. Field sampling and laboratory experiments, as well as other ...


Continuing Analysis Of Phytoplankton Nutrient Limitation In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli Oct 2018

Continuing Analysis Of Phytoplankton Nutrient Limitation In Farmington Bay And The Great Salt Lake, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Amy Marcarelli

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

Farmington Bay is a nutrient-enriched, highly eutrophic embayment of the Great Salt Lake. The highly variable salinity of the bay influences what species of plankton can survive there. Previous analyses suggested that cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) may not be able to survive or fix atmospheric nitrogen at high salinities, thus maintaining the lake in a nitrogen-limited state. To determine the interacting influence of nutrients and salinity on the growth and nitrogen fixation of plankton we performed a 28-day bioassay with water from Farmington and Gilbert Bays in October 2004. We tested the response of the plankton to additions of nitrogen (N ...


Comparison Of The Aquatic Ecology Of Side-Canyons And The Main Channel Of Lake Powell, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Kirsten L. Gallo Oct 2018

Comparison Of The Aquatic Ecology Of Side-Canyons And The Main Channel Of Lake Powell, Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh, Kirsten L. Gallo

Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

From 18-21 April 1996, students in a Utah State University class (Aquatic Ecology Laboratory; FW 560) measured limnological and fisheries characteristics in two side canyons (Halls Creek Bay and Moki Canyon) and the main channel of Lake Powell. Inclement weather precluded sampling of two other side canyons. Most of the sub-projects, directed by indiVIdual students, addressed the following two hypotheses: (1) productivity gradients existed from the inflows of the side canyons toward the main channel and; (2) productivity was higher in the side canyons than in the main channel of the lake. In most cases, parameters were measured at 3-5 ...


The Shellfish Corner: The Promises Of Aquaculture And Caveat Emptor, Michael A. Rice Jul 2018

The Shellfish Corner: The Promises Of Aquaculture And Caveat Emptor, Michael A. Rice

Michael A Rice

For at least five decades in America there has been a fascination about aquaculture as a means to "feed the world" in a sustainable way. Periodic reporting by the popular press has generated excitement about the potential of aquaculture among the general public and often this excitement often leads to unrealistic expectations and engagement in unsound business decision making by the novices in the field. Aquaculture entrepreneurs and investors are urged to exercise good judgement by sticking with with fundamentally sound business planning while maintaining realistic business expectations.


Sequencing A Shrimp Diversity Panel, Emily Kawaler, Max F. Rothschild, Zhiqiang Du Jun 2018

Sequencing A Shrimp Diversity Panel, Emily Kawaler, Max F. Rothschild, Zhiqiang Du

Max Rothschild

Eighty-six shrimp (eighty Pacific White, six Tiger shrimp) from ten different geographic regions were sequenced with a twofold goal: first, to better understand and document the genetic makeup of the species, and second, to discover genetic differences between shrimp lines that may facilitate the breeding of shrimp with better performance traits


Fisheries Exploitation By Albatross Quantified With Lipid Analysis, Melinda G. Conners, Chandra Goetsch, Suzanne M. Budge, William A. Walker, Yoko Mitani, Daniel P. Costa, Scott A. Shaffer Apr 2018

Fisheries Exploitation By Albatross Quantified With Lipid Analysis, Melinda G. Conners, Chandra Goetsch, Suzanne M. Budge, William A. Walker, Yoko Mitani, Daniel P. Costa, Scott A. Shaffer

Scott A. Shaffer

Mortality from incidental bycatch in longline fishery operations is a global threat to seabird populations, and especially so for the albatross family (Diomedeidae) in which fifteen out of twenty-two species are threatened by extinction. Despite the risks, fisheries remain attractive to many species of seabird by providing access to high-energy foods in the form of discarded fish and offal, target fish, and baited hooks. Current policy regarding fisheries management is increasingly aimed at discard reform, exemplified by a discard ban initiated in the European Union Common Fisheries Policy in 2014. While there is global agreement in the importance of minimizing ...


The Shellfish Corner: Shellfish Aquaculture In The Commons, Michael A. Rice Mar 2018

The Shellfish Corner: Shellfish Aquaculture In The Commons, Michael A. Rice

Michael A Rice

The major common denominator of shellfish aquaculture in coastal or estuarine waters worldwide is that most culture operations are conducted in common or public trust waters, necessitating constant interaction in the political arena with other competing interests. As a matter of practicality, the best systems for managing aquaculture lease policy in an equitable manner are on a local enough scale to facilitate stakeholder involvement, and to allow aquaculturists to organize into professional trade organizations so that the collective interest of the industry is heard in the process.


Variability In Growth And Age Structure Among Populations Of Ribbed Mussels, Geukensia Demissa (Dillwyn) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae), In Jamacia Bay, New York (Gateway Nra), John Tanacredi Ph.D., David R. Franz Feb 2018

Variability In Growth And Age Structure Among Populations Of Ribbed Mussels, Geukensia Demissa (Dillwyn) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae), In Jamacia Bay, New York (Gateway Nra), John Tanacredi Ph.D., David R. Franz

Dr. John T. Tanacredi

Growth rates, body weight, density and biomass of ribbed mussels, Geukensia demissa (Dillwyn), were determined at Spartina alterniflora marsh-flat sites in Jamaica Bay, New York (Lower Hudson Estuary). Cumulative growth and annual growth increments varied but rates were lower at sites within the central bay relative to peripheral sites. Local variability both in size at Ring-1 and size-specific annual growth rates probably account for the variability in cumulative length. No pattersn were noted in frequency distributions of shell size but congruence in age structure was observed among neighboring sites in some areas of the bay. Mussel densities were greater within ...


Water Quality Characterization And Mathematical Modeling Of Dissolved Oxygen In The East And West Ponds, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, John Tanacredi Ph.D., D Roy, Krishnanand Maillacheruvu Feb 2018

Water Quality Characterization And Mathematical Modeling Of Dissolved Oxygen In The East And West Ponds, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, John Tanacredi Ph.D., D Roy, Krishnanand Maillacheruvu

Dr. John T. Tanacredi

The current study was undertaken to characterize the East and West Ponds and develop a mathematical model of the effects of nutrient and BOD loading on dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in these ponds. The model predicted that both ponds will recover adequately given the average expected range of nutrient and BOD loading due to waste from surface runoff and migratory birds. The predicted dissolved oxygen levels in both ponds were greater than 5.0 mg/L, and were supported by DO levels in the field which were typically above 5.0 mg/L during the period of this study. The ...


Long-Term Sediment Bioassay Of Lead Toxicity In Two Generations Of The Marine Amphipod Elasmopus Laevis, S.I. Smith, 1873, John T. Tanacredi Ph.D., Martin P. Schriebmann, Mark J. Ringenary, Alan H. Molof, Konstantinos Kostarelos Feb 2018

Long-Term Sediment Bioassay Of Lead Toxicity In Two Generations Of The Marine Amphipod Elasmopus Laevis, S.I. Smith, 1873, John T. Tanacredi Ph.D., Martin P. Schriebmann, Mark J. Ringenary, Alan H. Molof, Konstantinos Kostarelos

Dr. John T. Tanacredi

Sediments are evaluated for toxicity by measuring mortality in a single cohort of amphipods in either acute (10-d) or chronic (28-d) bioassays. This investigation differed from conventional bioassays in four ways: Sublethal effects (fecundity) were estimated; the testing period was 60+ d; two successive generations were examined; and Elasmopus laevis Smith, 1873, amphipods were employed. Four test sediments were created between 58 and 424 µg/g of lead using the 30-µg/g whole-sediment as the control. Bioaccumulated lead at 60 d varied as a linear function of lead concentration in the sediments. Fecundity, as estimated by offspring-per-chamber and/or percent ...


Rare And Endangered Plants At Gateway National Recreation Area: A Case For Protection Of Urban Natural Areas, John T. Tanacredi Ph.D., Richard Stalter, Michael D. Byer Feb 2018

Rare And Endangered Plants At Gateway National Recreation Area: A Case For Protection Of Urban Natural Areas, John T. Tanacredi Ph.D., Richard Stalter, Michael D. Byer

Dr. John T. Tanacredi

The diversity of native plant species in urban environments is usually overlooked when biodiversity levels are considered. Inventories of native plants reveal many to be rare species surviving the harsh conditions encountered in urban ecosystems. Knowledge of their existence and an inventory of their distribution will assist in maintaining these populations. Protection strategies for rare plant species are outlined for urban National Parks.


Limulus In The Limelight: Exploring An Ancient Species, John Tanacredi Ph.D. Feb 2018

Limulus In The Limelight: Exploring An Ancient Species, John Tanacredi Ph.D.

Dr. John T. Tanacredi

In an era when sports numbers shatter historical ceilings (especially in baseball) and fall by the wayside like fall leaves, a most enduring record of life continues to crawl along emerging from the sea early each spring pronouncing their incredible "record" of existences... over 350 million years. Now there is a number that even the rarified air of baseball salaries can admire. Yet, today the remarkable sea creature which endured over 100 million years of dramatically changing earth history prior to the existence of the dinosaurs, and which is comprised of only four species globally, is being tested for its ...


Rotating Biological Contractors As An Effective Removal System Of Waste Petroleum Hydrocarbons From Untreated Wastewaters, John Tanacredi Ph.D., R. C. Cardenas Feb 2018

Rotating Biological Contractors As An Effective Removal System Of Waste Petroleum Hydrocarbons From Untreated Wastewaters, John Tanacredi Ph.D., R. C. Cardenas

Dr. John T. Tanacredi

A staged, partially submerged rotating biological disk system was assessed to determine its performance in the reduction of detectable concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH0 attributable to waste crankcase oils (WCCO) in wastewater effluent. Results indicate that such biological systems for the removal of WCCO aromatic hydrocarbons may be a viable alternative to secondary treatment systems commonly being employed.


Managing Birds And Controlling Aircraft In The Kennedy Airport–Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Complex: The Need For Hard Data And Soft Opinions, John Tanacredi Ph.D., Kevin Brown, R. Michael Erwin, Milo E. Richmond, P A. Buckley, Dave Avrin Feb 2018

Managing Birds And Controlling Aircraft In The Kennedy Airport–Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Complex: The Need For Hard Data And Soft Opinions, John Tanacredi Ph.D., Kevin Brown, R. Michael Erwin, Milo E. Richmond, P A. Buckley, Dave Avrin

Dr. John T. Tanacredi

During the 1980s, the exponential growth of laughing gull (Larus atricilla) colonies, from 15 to about 7600 nests in 1990, in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and a correlated increase in the bird-strike rate at nearby John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York City) led to a controversy between wildlife and airport managers over the elimination of the colonies. In this paper, we review data to evaluate if: (1) the colonies have increased the level of risk to the flying public; (2) on-colony population control would reduce the presence of gulls, and subsequently bird strikes, at the airport; and (3 ...