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Full-Text Articles in Aquaculture and Fisheries

Pain Perception In Fish: Evidence And Implications For The Use Of Fish, Lynne U. Sneddon Aug 2015

Pain Perception In Fish: Evidence And Implications For The Use Of Fish, Lynne U. Sneddon

Lynne U. Sneddon, Ph.D.

Pain assessment in fish is particularly challenging due to their evolutionary distance from humans, their lack of audible vocalization, and apparently expressionless demeanour. However, there are criteria that can be used to gauge whether pain perception occurs using carefully executed scientific approaches. Here, the standards for pain in fish are discussed and can be considered in three ways: neural detection and processing of pain; adverse responses to pain; and consciously experiencing pain. Many procedures that we subject fish to cause tissue damage and may give rise to the sensation of pain. Fish are popular as pets, in animal exhibits, and ...


Animal Welfare Perspectives On Recreational Angling, Steven J. Cooke, Lynne U. Sneddon Jul 2015

Animal Welfare Perspectives On Recreational Angling, Steven J. Cooke, Lynne U. Sneddon

Lynne U. Sneddon, Ph.D.

Fish captured by recreational anglers are often released either voluntarily or because of harvest regulations in a process called ‘‘catch-and-release’’. Catch-and-release angling is thought to be beneficial for the conservation of fish stocks based on the premise that most of the fish that are released survive. However, expanding interest in animal welfare has promoted debate regarding the ethics of catch-and-release angling. There is a growing recognition that fish can consciously experience nociception and that they have some capacity to experience pain and fear. Indeed, empirical anatomical, physiological, and behavioural evidence supports the notion that fish could experience these two forms ...


Differences In Response To Hypoxia In The Three-Spined Stickleback From Lotic And Lentic Localities: Dominance And An Anaerobic Metabolite, L. U. Sneddon, J. Yerbury Jun 2015

Differences In Response To Hypoxia In The Three-Spined Stickleback From Lotic And Lentic Localities: Dominance And An Anaerobic Metabolite, L. U. Sneddon, J. Yerbury

Lynne U. Sneddon, Ph.D.

Dominance hierarchies of the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus from river and pond populations were subjected to hypoxia (20%, range±1%). Under hypoxia, the hierarchies were less stable in terms of rank position and tissue L-lactate was higher in river fish than pond fish under normoxia and hypoxia. Dominant fish gained mass under normoxia but lost mass under hypoxic conditions possibly due to them maintaining high levels of aggression.