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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Effects Of Inter-Specific Density And Food Supply On Survivorship And Growth Of Newly Settled Benthos, Roman Zajac, Robert B. Whitlatch, Richard W. Osman Aug 1989

Effects Of Inter-Specific Density And Food Supply On Survivorship And Growth Of Newly Settled Benthos, Roman Zajac, Robert B. Whitlatch, Richard W. Osman

Biology and Environmental Science Faculty Publications

Using a laboratory model system comprised of newly settled oysters Crassostrea virginica and established fouling species (Botrylloides sp. initially, and others including Styela clava and Ciona intestinalis as the experiment progressed), we tested how differences in food supply and competitor density may affect post-settlement surivorship and growth of sessile marine invertebrates over a 44 d period. After 15 d, results were mixed but indicated that both food and density conditions affected growth and survivorship significantly, with some suggestion of high food levels ameliorating high density effects However, 44 d after settlement, oysters had reduced survivorship and growth when competitors were ...


Effects Of Resident Species On Recruitment Into A Community: Larval Settlement Versus Post-Settlement Mortality In The Oyster Crassostrea Virginica, Roman Zajac, Richard W. Osman, Robert B. Whitlatch Jun 1989

Effects Of Resident Species On Recruitment Into A Community: Larval Settlement Versus Post-Settlement Mortality In The Oyster Crassostrea Virginica, Roman Zajac, Richard W. Osman, Robert B. Whitlatch

Biology and Environmental Science Faculty Publications

Laboratory and field experiments revealed that a variety of species of common, sessile invertebrates, including barnacles, ascidians, and bryozoans, affected the settlement and post-settlement abundance of the oyster Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin). While the nature of the effects varied, most species both reduced oyster settlement by covering and removing substrate available for attachment, and increased settlement on adjacent surfaces. The solitary ascidians Ciona intestinalis (L.) and Styela clava (Herdman), were found to be predators of oyster larvae. Post-settlement survivorship and growth were also strongly affected by the presence of sessile species. In most cases the effects were negative and correlated with ...


Anatomical Features In Histological Sections Of Crassostrea Virginica (Gmelin, 1791) As An Aid In Management Of Gonad Area For Reproductive Assessment, Reinaldo Morales-Alamo, Roger L. Mann Jan 1989

Anatomical Features In Histological Sections Of Crassostrea Virginica (Gmelin, 1791) As An Aid In Management Of Gonad Area For Reproductive Assessment, Reinaldo Morales-Alamo, Roger L. Mann

VIMS Articles

The relationship between gonad area in transverse histological sections of the American oyster Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin 1790) and body location from which the section was cut was studied in specimens collected from four stations in the James River, Virginia in 1984 and 1986. Gonad area, expressed as percentage of total body area, increases in an antero-posterior direction; this requires use of sections from the same body location in comparisons between oysters. Approximate body locations, identified according to the anatomy and arrangement of the internal organs in the sections, were grouped into five types with similar gonad area percentages. One of ...


The Growth Of Cultchless Crassostrea Virginica Spat At Biloxi Bay, Mississippi Using Different Methods Of Culture, John T. Ogle Jan 1989

The Growth Of Cultchless Crassostrea Virginica Spat At Biloxi Bay, Mississippi Using Different Methods Of Culture, John T. Ogle

Gulf and Caribbean Research

Oyster spat produced from the experimental hatchery of the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory at Point Cadet, Biloxi, Mississippi, were grown under a variety of conditions. Recovery of spat planted on adjacent bay bottom was negligible, despite the use of either whole oyster valves, crushed oyster shell or clam shell as a substrate. Negligible growth occurred for spat held in vertical and horizontal water tanks. Growth of spat in horizontal tanks was affected by the density of stocking, with lower densities producing faster growth. Growth in all studies was slower than anticipated and a comparison on growth for spat from a ...