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Crassostrea virginica

Cell and Developmental Biology

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Development And Validation Of Gene Delivery Methods For ​Crassostrea Virginica, Adrienne N. Tracy Jan 2020

Development And Validation Of Gene Delivery Methods For ​Crassostrea Virginica, Adrienne N. Tracy

Honors Theses

The Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is an important part of the East Coastal USA economy because aquaculture creates jobs. Sadly, the oysters are under constant threat due to increasing pollution, red tides, and diseases. Bivalves, and oysters in particular, are also becoming potential model organisms in medical research. With the sequencing of the oyster genome, scientists are focusing on deciphering the function of the predicted genes. However, the limited number of molecular and cellular tools available makes functional annotation of the genome challenging. A consistent, replicable gene delivery system needs to be developed to assess gene function and understand the ...


Innervation Of Gill Lateral Cells In The Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea Virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential And Cilia Activity, Edward J. Catapane, Michael Nelson, Trevon Adams, Margaret A. Carroll May 2016

Innervation Of Gill Lateral Cells In The Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea Virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential And Cilia Activity, Edward J. Catapane, Michael Nelson, Trevon Adams, Margaret A. Carroll

Publications and Research

Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization ...